pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Does cutcaster allow editorial images?  (Read 6737 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« on: April 25, 2011, 22:42 »
0
Just curious.


« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2011, 00:59 »
0
as far as i know they dont.

« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2011, 01:32 »
0
Yes they do. They have to be news type though, they don't seem to be looking for images with a long life span, like DT, ss and 123rf. Eg. they rejected the first image below of an annual festival in India and could sell for the next 100 years. But accepted the second pic. of a tournament which lasted 1 week, plus Tennis players also have a limited time at being famous. Also, don't send them any editorial pics. with kids in them. Cutcaster's world only has adults in it.




« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2011, 02:16 »
0
Ups my mistake.

WarrenPrice

« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2011, 10:08 »
0
Yes they do. They have to be news type though, they don't seem to be looking for images with a long life span, like Dreamstime, Shutterstock and 123rf. Eg. they rejected the first image below of an annual festival in India and could sell for the next 100 years. But accepted the second pic. of a tournament which lasted 1 week, plus Tennis players also have a limited time at being famous. Also, don't send them any editorial pics. with kids in them. Cutcaster's world only has adults in it.


I've found just the opposite to be the case.  My "Niche" that Cathy mentioned is 30-year old Grand Prix Motocross images that I have scanned to digital and offer "exclusively" at Cutcaster.
Cutcaster allows you to set the price on your image.  You should contact John Griffin to discuss your portfolio:
john@cutcaster.com
Have you considered selling directly through your own website?  Blog about animals to increase your "Google" visibility.
Other possibilities are prints at Imagekind
or, calendars, etc, at Lulu.
You have a great portfolio.  I don't think it is really "stockish."  It is poster/print material.  Do more research.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2011, 10:10 by WarrenPrice »

« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2011, 11:42 »
0
Thanks.

As I stated in my other thread, I am looking for a way to learn more about the business and get my feet wet in the microworld.

I am at Getty images and it is working well. Its more creative, with fewer images but larger sales. There is no feedback however, I simply get checks once a month!

I would like the option to produce a portfolio of "unique" stock images. Yes, involving animals but also other situations. I have a lot of experience with advertising in the "pet industry" and have a first hand account of what would be needed, when and how best to shoot it. So, building this portfolio for the masses would be an interesting "project" for me.

I was hoping for a site with higher rates than micro and the ability to monitor sales, views, etc as well as gaining experience in keywording and the like.

I shoot portraits and ads for more specific adverts in my area. I am not really interested in distributing myself at this time. I do have my site somewhat up and running (http://www.chadlatta.com) but its a work in progress. A blog is planned to tie me a little more to my community, but not so much stock related. Blogs, distribution and all that take time....something I don't have a lot of and would rather use shooting.

I havent ruled it out, but I have to get started somewhere!

« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2011, 11:44 »
0
I have considered the calendaer, postcard, greeting card route. Again, its work, something I am not avoiding, but I have to consider my time and whether its worth it.

I could see myself shooting a calendar for 2012 and pushing it out there, but that is a whole different ballgame I know nothing about!

« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2011, 12:15 »
0
Yes, we do!  However the picture of the face above, though a part of a festival, looks as if you had plenty of access, and therefore could have gotten a model release.  We also RARELY take pictures of "editorial children". And do not often take pictures of people's backsides at the beach, especially when we can tell the person or people were unaware of being photographed.  (Think ladies at the beach.)  In general, editorial images should be news worthy. or documentary.  We are being pretty selective about our editorial images.  For instance, the small town America Thanksgiving parade is not as desirable as the very marketable red carpet or well documented (through keywords, title, description, etc) disaster photo.

I am happy to address individual questions about images by email.

Thanks!

Cora@cutcaster.com

Carl

  • Carl Stewart, CS Productions
« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2011, 07:00 »
0
I recently had eight editorial photos rejected on Dreamstime but accepted on Cutcaster.  The description of each contained a news-style synopsis of a failed theme park in Florida which was owned by the communist government of China.

« Last Edit: April 27, 2011, 07:05 by csproductions »

« Reply #9 on: April 27, 2011, 19:51 »
0
Thanks.

Cora, I will be sending you an email shortly.


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
4 Replies
3401 Views
Last post October 14, 2008, 17:10
by madelaide
11 Replies
4333 Views
Last post September 21, 2008, 14:09
by borg
14 Replies
5048 Views
Last post October 01, 2010, 03:57
by mtkang
0 Replies
1682 Views
Last post March 25, 2011, 00:52
by bizair
5 Replies
3422 Views
Last post April 07, 2012, 00:32
by Microbius

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results