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Author Topic: "Dreamstime Ups Collection of Free Images"  (Read 16181 times)

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« on: October 30, 2009, 07:41 »
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From Reuters (link):
Quote
Several Thousands Of Free Stock Photos Added In First 24 Hours Of Enhancement
NASHVILLE, Tenn.--(Business Wire)--
Serban Enache, CEO of Dreamstime, one of the world`s leading digital image stock
photography agencies, announced the company`s initiative to up the number of
images made available ABSOLUTELY FREE.

In January 2007, Dreamstime made available an assortment of images under its
FREE umbrella. The FREEselection-an original and revolutionary sector that has
attracted bargain hunters from around the globe-is a successfully proven concept
that has secured Dreamstime`s footprint in the industry as one-stop-photo-shop
giant.

Dreamstime has nearly doubled the number of images available ABSOLUTELY FREE
(increasing its FREE library of images by 10% in the first three hours of the
FREE upgrade as effected on October 27th).

It's all about more market share for companies. No word about benefits for contributors. I didn't know that giving away images from contributors was a revolutionary sector.  :-\
« Last Edit: October 30, 2009, 07:46 by FD-amateur »


« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2009, 09:02 »
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Well this confirms what the "database cleanup" is actually about.

WarrenPrice

« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2009, 09:14 »
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My post on this subject in the DT Forum was deleted followed by a "private" comment from Achilles.


« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2009, 10:56 »
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The 'database cleanup' line is mostly BS.  I'm a software developer and I work with databases.

First, a database doesn't require cleanup, it's just data on a hard drive.  Actual cleanup might be required if the amount of old data was so large, in relation to the currently active data, that it was slowing down operations. That's clearly not the case here.

Second, note that they're not actually removing these images from their database, just marking them 'free'.  Nothing is being 'cleaned up'.  

It's just a gimmick to get more free images to attract new buyers.

Oh and Warren, don't mess with the DT forum.  Anything remotely negative will be deleted and the guy will do weird stuff, like leave snarky replies attached as comments to your photos.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2009, 11:01 by stockastic »

« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2009, 11:10 »
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Well this confirms what the "database cleanup" is actually about.
According to a very recent post from Achilles in the DT forum, the donators will get a boost in the search rank. Ahum...  ;) Your choice, of course.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2009, 11:19 by FD-amateur »

« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2009, 11:17 »
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It's just a gimmick to get more free images to attract new buyers.
Not even that. Freebee hunters almost never become buyers. Whoever wants a usable well licensed shot will go to the paying images since the choice is much wider there and the time searching through sub-par images isn't worth the time/money of the possible gain of 2-3$. For an independent contributor, the larger market share of site A vs. site B doesn't matter, since it's a zero sum operation for his pocket.

Let's see. DT has a long history of a having a good attitude towards its contributors, so it's just a storm in a glass of water.  ;)
« Last Edit: October 30, 2009, 11:28 by FD-amateur »

« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2009, 11:19 »
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Interesting...

« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2009, 11:39 »
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Let's see. DT has a long history of a having a good attitude towards its contributors, so it's just a storm in a glass of water.  ;)

It is that, but it's also a part of microstock's relentless march towards free images.  The subtle pressure to make your images free, or to sign on to other gimmicky discount plans, won't let up.

« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2009, 11:59 »
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It is that, but it's also a part of microstock's relentless march towards free images.  The subtle pressure to make your images free, or to sign on to other gimmicky discount plans, won't let up.

It's like turkeys voting for Xmas. There are lots of perfectly useable images in the free section as evidenced by the hundreds of downloads that many of them have had. Just because an image hasn't sold for a few years doesn't prove that the image is useless, it may simply be that there was a marginally better option that the buyers preferred. An image without sales can rapidly descend down the search order to the point where it is unlikely to be seen again.

With the thousands of new images being approved each week, with many of them in large virtually-identical series, then it is likely that many more images in future will suffer the fate of being ignored by the buyers. If  a significant proportion of those end up on the free sections then it could very seriously damage sales.

I much prefer IS's solution to this issue of the Dollar Bin. At least the contributor (and the agency) gets some money out of the deal.

« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2009, 12:04 »
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It is that, but it's also a part of microstock's relentless march towards free images.  The subtle pressure to make your images free, or to sign on to other gimmicky discount plans, won't let up.
If that might become the norm, the agents are very vulnerable since they rely on the contributors. One idea: what if contributors bundle their free images on one site and share the ads revenue themselves?

« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2009, 12:22 »
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<..
..>
Second, note that they're not actually removing these images from their database, just marking them 'free'.  Nothing is being 'cleaned up'.  

It's just a gimmick to get more free images to attract new buyers.
<..
..>

Another Perspective!

Dreamstime may have a different view on this, every forum you visit you will see post after post about removing 'the dross' and leaving the customers a tightly edited set of images, the main reason that images are not selected for deleation is one of cost, who is going to pay?

I agree the way they are doing this is not right as they have not offered an 'opt-in' with 'opt-out' as default, many of the images will be from non-active contributors, those who may have changed e-mail addresses and will never know that their images are being offered 'free of charge' without permission, after they agreed to a 'sales contract' and have not accepted an updated one.

The site has had these images without sales for a while and they have been a 'cost to the business', if they result in any sales for other contributors who's sales have supported the non-selling images, and attract some revenue for Dreamstime this may be seen as a little compensation.

David  ;D 

« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2009, 12:33 »
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I'm coming to the conclusion that I should contribute to only a couple of microstocks and dump the rest, because I can't trust them and can't spend time monitoring all the changes they announce.   They're rewriting contributor "agreements" every other week, whenever they come up with a new marketing gimmick or sign up a new partner site.   My images are on God knows how many of these snaky "partner" sites already.  I assume the partners don't actually get the image files, just the right to display thumbnails and resell them - but who knows.    My images might even be offered free, if I overlook an email announcing the new rules.   


« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2009, 12:35 »
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I don't like free sections but I can't see them being much of a threat.  I don't know how many image buyers will spend time going through all the dross in a free section, it obviously isn't a high percentage or the sites wouldn't be doing this.  If free sections become a problem, I am sure the sites would get rid of them.

If the sites really are marching us towards free images, can someone please explain the business plan?  I think they make more money selling our images than they would giving them away.  There have been free sites around since before microstock existed and some of the sites have always had a free section but they still have good sales and it doesn't seem to of hindered growth at all.  I don't see why that should change now.

« Reply #13 on: October 30, 2009, 12:41 »
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If the sites really are marching us towards free images, can someone please explain the business plan?  I think they make more money selling our images than they would giving them away.

So why are they so eager to tout about it?

« Reply #14 on: October 30, 2009, 12:49 »
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sharpshot, you're thinking these guys are visionary businessmen, intent on building a sustainable model for the long haul?  And not just more dot-com entrepreneurs?   

Twenty-five cents is already pretty close to free.

« Reply #15 on: October 30, 2009, 12:54 »
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Let's see. DT has a long history of a having a good attitude towards its contributors, so it's just a storm in a glass of water.  ;)

It is that, but it's also a part of microstock's relentless march towards free images.  The subtle pressure to make your images free, or to sign on to other gimmicky discount plans, won't let up.

That's wrong. Free images just are possible in the way and "quality" they exist now, for instance, at stockechange. Free images will always have the quality of the begginings of microsctok. Certanily, you'll always will be able to find some gem (snapshots, scenery or monuments made by amateurs), but what you willl mostly get is poor stuff, brother in-laws acting as models, cats, pets, nothing worth. Who is going to spend 2,000, or 200 or even 50 dollars in a session to, then, give away the images?

Cheepo suscriptions plans, free images... all this doesn't cntribute to brigthen the prestige of micro agencies. At the end, they can find that serious paying customers flee and are repaced for freebie-hunters.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2009, 12:55 by loop »

« Reply #16 on: October 30, 2009, 12:58 »
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Message posted at 10/29/2009, 10:07:44 AM by Sid - member is an admin     
   There's a new option in the selection page where you can set your default to disable instead of donating the image to the free section. Whatever you choose as default will carry on to your future unattended images.


I read through the thread on the DT forum and the above was posted. I'm a little unclear as to where EXACTLY I can find this option so that I can change it to disable, not donate. Can someone please explain exactly where it is? I've looked in the management area. When he says "selection page" I went to my online files and don't see anything there. I looked on My Profile page...I couldn't find where Achilles said specifically how we go about setting to disable instead of donate.

Does anyone know and can you please share?

« Reply #17 on: October 30, 2009, 13:01 »
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I can't find it either, after 5 minutes of searching.

« Reply #18 on: October 30, 2009, 13:12 »
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I created a new thread on the DT forum, asking where that specifically is located. I'll post any response.

lisafx

« Reply #19 on: October 30, 2009, 13:16 »
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I created a new thread on the DT forum, asking where that specifically is located. I'll post any response.

Thanks a lot Cathy.  I would like to know where that is too.

« Reply #20 on: October 30, 2009, 13:25 »
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Yeah, I read that as well in the forum and was wondering where it was. Maybe, it was added to the page of your "flagged for free" files?

« Reply #21 on: October 30, 2009, 14:29 »
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sharpshot, you're thinking these guys are visionary businessmen, intent on building a sustainable model for the long haul?  And not just more dot-com entrepreneurs?   

Twenty-five cents is already pretty close to free.
I think they have done well so far and I don't think they are suddenly going to try to ruin a business that is worth millions.  A lot of us don't like free images but several sites have said it is a way to bring in new buyers and I doubt they would do something that would lower the overall amount buyers spend.  The sites that have free images are doing well and there is no sign that buyers are using the free images instead of buying, I don't see why that should change now.

ShadySue

« Reply #22 on: October 30, 2009, 14:34 »
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I much prefer IS's solution to this issue of the Dollar Bin. At least the contributor (and the agency) gets some money out of the deal.
Is anyone actually making much from iStock's DB? Since the price hike there, my images have mostly been moribund, and it's what I'm hearing from others, but hardly a representative sample.

« Reply #23 on: October 30, 2009, 15:01 »
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The sites that have free images are doing well and there is no sign that buyers are using the free images instead of buying, I don't see why that should change now.

As mentioned above, DT is a successful site. If they think a free area is good for business, that's ok by me. I STILL don't want them taking my images without my permission and giving them away. That's just wrong.

It was either in this thread or the thread that got locked on the DT forum where a poster kept saying how we should all support this free image section because after all, they inspect our photos for free, blah, blah, blah. It bothered me that the poster thinks that DT is inspecting FOR FREE and out of the goodness of their heart and we should in turn be willing to give up stuff for free. They don't inspect our images for free...they get paid a huge percent of the sale for that! Inspecting is a cost of doing business for them...they don't do it for free! I couldn't believe somebody actually said that!

« Reply #24 on: October 30, 2009, 15:02 »
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One thing that is apparent is that these agencies keep a close step with each other.  Once one makes a move it is not long before the others follow.  Cleaning up databases is now all the rage, freebies, premium subscriptions.  We just need them to start making BOLD moves now that the industry is moving from kindergarten to grade school.


 

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