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Author Topic: Dreamstime are driving me crazy!!!  (Read 28824 times)

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« on: June 15, 2010, 04:13 »
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Dreamstimes new policy of 'no similars' is driving me crazy.

I shot a series of garden herbs, chives, coriander, basil, etc, etc, different bunches, and they will only accept one shot, so what if someone wants basil, chives, coriander, etc, etc and not mint. They have only let mint in. INSANNNNE! Sorry had to get it off my chest and there appears to be no appeals procedure for dreamstime, is there?


RT


« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2010, 04:26 »
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I recently had some images rejected under the too similar tag, these images are part of a series which I sell thousands off on iS and the other sites but the subject is a completely different concept (all of the other sites have approved them obviously). I sent a message to support but they insisted I replied to the rejection email which then goes back to the original editor!!!!! What's the point in that? His reply to my appeal made me believe he didn't really understand about the stock business and what makes an image sellable so if he didn't understand it the first time how is appealing to him a second time worthwhile. Even the images in the series that I do have on DT are my best sellers there  ???

So the lesson I learnt was if you have a niche series which sells in the thousands everywhere else you can only upload one to Dreamstime, even if the actual subject concept is 100% different. Now I wonder why people are stating that their Dreamstime sales aren't keeping up with the other sites  ::)

« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2010, 04:41 »
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Yes, understand what you mean! I find it difficult how to deal with this. There's nothing what you can do about it yourself, for this rejection has nothing to do with quality of the images, overabundant subject or something like that...
I uploaded some editorials and did a search before. They had none of that subject at all on their site. None the less they rejected some of the series for ' too much of the same series'. Elsewhere they are nearly all accepted.
When going on doing so with the images of every contributor, they will through time end up having smaller collections of different subjects than all other stocksites have. Not the best way to attract buyers in my opinion. But perhaps I see that wrong...?

Xalanx

« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2010, 04:46 »
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I sent a message to support but they insisted I replied to the rejection email which then goes back to the original editor!!!!! What's the point in that?

Richard, I admire your perseverance. But I think you'll always get the same answer "I was right the first time and of course I'm right now". I believe there is no point in arguing or trying to reason with these guys. The translated universal reply to every contributor that tries to explain them anything is "We are not what you think we are". On top of that, RPD is falling aggressively and income as well. Therefore I can't be bothered with uploading to them anymore. Every once in a while my wife sends them some images, but I really don't care what happens with them.

ap

« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2010, 04:52 »
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my feelings is that they either like the pictures or they don't. i had three very similar cherry blossom photos all accepted. i was just going to let them choose the one they preferred but much to my surprise, they didn't pull the 'similars' card here.

« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2010, 05:01 »
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Therefore I can't be bothered with uploading to them anymore ... I really don't care what happens with them.

... is the correct answer!

RT


« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2010, 05:33 »
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Therefore I can't be bothered with uploading to them anymore ... I really don't care what happens with them.

... is the correct answer!

I'm tending to agree that it might not be worth uploading to them anymore, however I don't want this to be the case, I like the commission structure on Dreamstime and the fact you can get the best part of $2 for an extra small depending on the image level but it seems recently the staff at Dreamstime all appear to be on a self guided self destruct programme, they're not in the same league as the top 3 agencies and sales there don't account for much of my income but it's a nice little bonus.

« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2010, 06:02 »
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I sent a message to support but they insisted I replied to the rejection email which then goes back to the original editor!!!!! What's the point in that? His reply to my appeal made me believe he didn't really understand about the stock business and what makes an image sellable so if he didn't understand it the first time how is appealing to him a second time worthwhile.


I think DT may have out-sourced some of their inspection process to a company specialising in it. That's probably why they just refer you back to them. It also may explain why the contractor is so rigid in applying whatever 'rules' they have been given. Of course the contractor doesn't have a vested interest in sales, either on behalf of the agency itself or the contributor, but is more concerned with keeping DT happy and retaining their services.

I wouldn't mind so much if their policy really did lead to a higher standard of images for the buyers __ but it doesn't. The default sort order produces simply awful results. Try this search on 'breakfast cooked' with the sort order set to the default of 'relevancy descending' and 80 images per page;

http://tinyurl.com/breakfastcooked

There are only 9 contributors represented on the first page out of 4800-odd results. No less than 63 of the 80 images are all from one contributor, are nearly a year old and have only one sale between them. Hardly surprising that our sales there see-saw up and down and are generally in decline. What on earth are DT playing at?
« Last Edit: June 15, 2010, 06:10 by gostwyck »

RT


« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2010, 06:20 »
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I think DT may have out-sourced some of their inspection process to a company specialising in it. That's probably why they just refer you back to them. It also may explain why the contractor is so rigid in applying whatever 'rules' they have been given. Of course the contractor doesn't have a vested interest in sales, either on behalf of the agency itself or the contributor, but is more concerned with keeping DT happy and retaining their services.

In my case the reviewer has a portfolio on Dreamstime and is listed as one of their editors, I'm not going to bad mouth the person other than say they aren't really in a position to dictate what makes a successful stock image  :o

You know my portfolio, the images that have all the flames on iS well it was more of that series each one with a different concept, and those that DT rejected have had 11 sales on iS in the first week.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2010, 06:26 by RT »

« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2010, 06:28 »
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Dreamstimes new policy of 'no similars' is driving me crazy.

I shot a series of garden herbs, chives, coriander, basil, etc, etc, different bunches, and they will only accept one shot, so what if someone wants basil, chives, coriander, etc, etc and not mint. They have only let mint in. INSANNNNE! Sorry had to get it off my chest and there appears to be no appeals procedure for dreamstime, is there?

I just looked at this week's DT "featured artist" linked from the tweet in the little box here at the top of the forum, and it's nothing but similars.

When I look at their stats of 5000+ uploads and 2000+ downloads, it amazes me they can churn them out and still have a roof over their head, especially with 5 'employees'.  
« Last Edit: June 15, 2010, 06:50 by sjlocke »

« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2010, 06:30 »
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You know my portfolio, the images that have all the flames on iS well it was more of that series each one with a different concept, and those that DT rejected have had 11 sales on iS in the first week.

That's almost unbelievable. The reviewer clearly does not have a clue about stock!

« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2010, 07:20 »
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Didn't one of the big shots stop uploading to DT due to "lack of professionalism"?  ::)

Gee, I wonder why...

« Reply #12 on: June 15, 2010, 07:28 »
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I just had two images approved they were similar horizontal and vertical of the same image I think thats why they were approved.

red

« Reply #13 on: June 15, 2010, 07:45 »
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This is what Achilles said at CEPIC:

The price level system of Dreamstime is one of the reasons that causes rejection for submitted series of similar photos: focusing on the best ones there is a greater probability to drive them to the higher levels of price with an advantage for the agency and the photographer.

More info here - http://www.mystockphoto.org/cepic-new-media-conference-making-millions-with-microstock-part-1/

« Reply #14 on: June 15, 2010, 07:52 »
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.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2010, 08:06 by FD-amateur »

« Reply #15 on: June 15, 2010, 07:55 »
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Quote
The price level system of Dreamstime is one of the reasons that causes rejection for submitted series of similar photos: focusing on the best ones there is a greater probability to drive them to the higher levels of price with an advantage for the agency and the photographer.

Translation: We only accept one (the best) shot of a series because then we will build the best library there is on the internet which will make lots of money for DT but less for the individual photographer *cough* did I just say that out loud?

Isn't it just terrific that DT is making these hard choices for us instead of simply approving technically correct images?

Approving one shot of a series of garden herbs and claiming it's the best shot of a series is just *cough* not right to make an understatement.

This is to the sole advantage of DT and not the contributors. DT will claim that this will be all for the greater good but what are the new streams of buyers good for if they want my chive image but DT only approved my cilantro...  ::)

« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2010, 08:07 »
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This is what Achilles said at CEPIC:

The price level system of Dreamstime is one of the reasons that causes rejection for submitted series of similar photos: focusing on the best ones there is a greater probability to drive them to the higher levels of price with an advantage for the agency and the photographer.

More info here - http://www.mystockphoto.org/cepic-new-media-conference-making-millions-with-microstock-part-1/


Perhaps this makes sense if the subjects are the same, but it is totally silly if the subjects are different.

« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2010, 08:12 »
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How can I remove image from exclusivity on DT?
Incidentally I have set several...

« Reply #18 on: June 15, 2010, 08:15 »
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How can I remove image from exclusivity on DT?
Incidentally I have set several...
Isn't there a time limit on this? Like a year? I would email support saying you did it by accident.

« Reply #19 on: June 15, 2010, 08:38 »
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Dreamstimes new policy of 'no similars' is driving me crazy.

I shot a series of garden herbs, chives, coriander, basil, etc, etc, different bunches, and they will only accept one shot, so what if someone wants basil, chives, coriander, etc, etc and not mint. They have only let mint in. INSANNNNE! Sorry had to get it off my chest and there appears to be no appeals procedure for dreamstime, is there?

That's a typical case of shots that they would love you to combine to a collage - six or so for the price of one for the buyer! Doesn't it even say so in the reject note?

« Reply #20 on: June 15, 2010, 08:43 »
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I am a little baffled too ... but haven't had so many rejections that I am too upset.

I did just have a rejection of a pair of english muffins that was not part of another food shoot, just a random shot I did because I was eating english muffins that day that was rejected for "too similar" which I don't get, but in reality it wasn't going to be my best seller so I am okay with it.

I just weed out the best images and submit those to Dreamstime.  

Truth be told -- my Dreamstime portfolio is selling very well, and money talks to me more then rejections.  I made more on Dreamstime last month then I did on iStock.  

I have been stuck at 78%-79% approval at Dreamstime so I can only submit 15 images / day and I submit 15 images every day.   I usually get about 1 rejection.  

« Reply #21 on: June 15, 2010, 08:48 »
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« Last Edit: June 15, 2010, 10:21 by FD-amateur »

« Reply #22 on: June 15, 2010, 09:09 »
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« Last Edit: June 15, 2010, 10:22 by FD-amateur »

« Reply #23 on: June 15, 2010, 09:53 »
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« Last Edit: June 15, 2010, 10:22 by FD-amateur »

« Reply #24 on: June 15, 2010, 09:57 »
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I just looked at this week's DT "featured artist" linked from the tweet in the little box here at the top of the forum, and it's nothing but similars.

When I look at their stats of 5000+ uploads and 2000+ downloads, it amazes me they can churn them out and still have a roof over their head, especially with 5 'employees'.  

LOL no kidding .. from a business perspective I would say that anyone who hires a full team is either A) not using micro as their primary income stream B) happy with extremely low profit margins C) Hasn't yet learned what a profit margin is or D) Is a complete idiot ... I'm guessing they fall under the A category .. at least I hope for them.

I think that micro "teams" are more like an entourage than an actual business team anyway. It's one of those mindsets of "Look at me !!! Look at me !!! .. I'm a photo god because I can employee an entire army to produce my images." I wonder how an entourage photographer would function in the real world with a client and no "team" to do all the real work for them. LOL probably be pretty amusing.


 

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