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Author Topic: Sliding right angle bracket  (Read 7858 times)

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« on: March 27, 2010, 01:57 »
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I have a need to slide a camera in portrait position sideways to take two overlapping portrait shots and stitch to make a square image. I have a manfrotto tripod with standard tilt head (not ball head), but finding some bracket that can attach to it which has a right angle to hold the camera vertically and also allows sliding is problematic. I do have a straight sliding bracket that can fit to tripod and camera, but I need the right angle. Any suggestions would be welcome.


« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2010, 07:51 »
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Why not just attach an "L" bracket available at any hardware store for a couple of dollars to your sliding straight bracket?

« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2010, 08:00 »
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I have a need to slide a camera in portrait position sideways to take two overlapping portrait shots and stitch to make a square image. I have a manfrotto tripod with standard tilt head (not ball head), but finding some bracket that can attach to it which has a right angle to hold the camera vertically and also allows sliding is problematic. I do have a straight sliding bracket that can fit to tripod and camera, but I need the right angle. Any suggestions would be welcome.

I just got up so maybe you have to disregard this question:

Why would you slide your camera for a stitch instead of turning it? Are you running out of background?

I tried stitching shots that I took by moving sideways. Total mess. The software I used (PTGui) couldn't handle it. You get far better results by simply rotating the camera. As long as the pivot point of the camera (or better of the sensor) is on the axis of the tripod you'll get a perfect square stitch.

Maybe you can elaborate your scenario so I can understand. It's too early.

« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2010, 08:25 »
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I'm using a TS lens to do the panorama. See the bottom of this article. I've got a 65mm Hartblei SuperRotator, and I'm actually shooting quite close up, attempting to get a square image at XXL or even XXXL (for istock) instead of 3:2 from my Pentax K20d. Perspective is an issue. The article says the camera should move rather than the lens when shifting right and left, which is why I'm trying to find a fairly accurate way to shift the camera.


This is an example, moving the tripod an inch or so between the two shots.

I'll probably go for the hardware store angle bracket. I'll have to get one arm tapped for a 1/4 inch BSW (for the tripod mount) and the other drilled to take a bolt and wing nut. Not so easy to get this done when living in the inner city with no ready access to engineers. That word "attach" is not as easy as it seems.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2010, 08:43 by averil »

« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2010, 08:59 »
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I'm using a TS lens to do the panorama. See the bottom of this article. I've got a 65mm Hartblei SuperRotator, and I'm actually shooting quite close up, attempting to get a square image at XXL or even XXXL (for istock) instead of 3:2 from my Pentax K20d. Perspective is an issue. The article says the camera should move rather than the lens when shifting right and left, which is why I'm trying to find a fairly accurate way to shift the camera. ...


Thanks, I understand now why you need to shift it.

« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2010, 09:32 »
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The bracket that I was referring to should already have holes large enough in it. Good luck!

« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2010, 09:50 »
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Ive been researching sliders myself heres a list of links ive collected, hopefully you find something inspiring in this

DIY

IndieSLIDER

GlideTRACK - this is what i think im going to purchase your tripod head sits on top so u should be able to lock the camera in portrait mode

« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2010, 19:11 »
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I never even thought of a slider or dolly system! If you've got one, shoot on a skateboard for slight side-to-side moves.

« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2010, 21:49 »
0
Ive been researching sliders myself heres a list of links ive collected, hopefully you find something inspiring in this

DIY

IndieSLIDER

GlideTRACK - this is what i think im going to purchase your tripod head sits on top so u should be able to lock the camera in portrait mode


I have the IndieSlider for my footage work and it has been invaluable.  And very much worth every penny.  I also built one of those DIY track dollies that runs on garden hose or PVC pipe depending on my needs.

« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2010, 22:41 »
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I just finished my DIY track dolly. Having lots of fun so far!

How does the garden hose hold up to the weight?

« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2010, 09:42 »
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I just finished my DIY track dolly. Having lots of fun so far!

How does the garden hose hold up to the weight?

I have a pretty light rig, so I have no problems with it... but I only use it in the house/studio.  I plan on getting a thicker/heavy duty hose for outside... but for the moment I've only needed/used PVC outside.

I'm building a new track dolly right now that is more portable and subsequently lighter.  I'm filming the process this time to put a Tut up on Vimeo when I'm done.


 

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