pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Digital Photo Professional  (Read 5598 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

WarrenPrice

« on: August 23, 2010, 14:05 »
0
I noticed a post earlier about using this software for Canon RAW files.  It came with my Canon T2i but I really haven't tried using it -- just a quick read-thru with one file.  I did see that it seems to work better with the Canon CR2 files than my Photoshop Elements works with NEF files. 
I think the earlier post was from FD-regular (amateur, etc).  Would someone care to offer more info on this software, PLEASE?

PS:  doesn't this also have some video capability?


« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2010, 14:24 »
0
PS:  doesn't this also have some video capability?

I don't shoot video for stock, only for kids concerts, etc.  When I got my T2i I found that none of my existing software could handle the HD video including DPP that came with the camera for stills processing and the NeroVision Express that I had been using to edit old-style video.  So I got Pinnacle Studio for editing video, which works pretty well.  I had to upgrade to a video card with 2GB of video RAM however, this cost around USD80.  It isn't really the video display capability that is required, but the video RAM and VPU which is used by the software to generate effects (animated titles, fades/wipes/etc.).  I wouldn't call the edited results using Pinnacle "professional" (i.e. Hollywood or network TV grade) but compared to other people's home videos it totally kicks azz.  An example of a minor glitch is that when I made a title in a fancy font, when it is faded out there is a bright "spot" in the middle of the lettering which is some kind of font artifact.

If your computer is insufficiently high powered with RAM, CPU, video card then these programs tend to lock up and crash frequently.

There was some indication on camera forums that people prefer "Sony Vegas" (?) for more professional results, but AFAIK it is pretty expensive.

For stock video which I understand requires very simple, short clips with no sound etc. then possibly a very simple, cheap software solution will be adequate allowing you to cut to required length, strip the soundtrack and save in the required format.  For weddings, etc. you might get away with something like Pinnacle or you might want to pop for the pro software.

« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2010, 14:47 »
0
I think the earlier post was from FD-regular (amateur, etc).  Would someone care to offer more info on this software, PLEASE?
Yap it comes with the cam (in my case 5DII) and the main use is treating RAW. As Photoshop never gives backwards updates on RAW formats, they force you to always buy the next version. I'm happy with CS2 but it doesn't handle CR2 files. DPP does just that. I use it for adjusting the WB, the CA and a little bit of sharpening (1) as it is better from RAW. I also use it to adjust the exposure since the RAW has a larger dynamic range than a 16-bit TIF and certainly an 8-bit JPG. You need to export this to 16 bit TIF and open it in PS. Don't save the edited RAW!

Especially when you have a Canon lens, the CA (fringe) reduction in DPP is superb and automatic since the program contains the lens profile. Stay away from all the sliders in that case.

Especially in your landscapes, you will love the high dynamic range and export 2 TIFS, one with emphasis on the shadows, one with emphasis on the highlights. Import both in PS, in 2 layers, and selectively erase at wish to obtain some pseudo-HDR.
PS:  doesn't this also have some video capability?
No DPP is only for still raws.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2010, 14:51 by FD-regular »

WarrenPrice

« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2010, 15:08 »
0
I think the earlier post was from FD-regular (amateur, etc).  Would someone care to offer more info on this software, PLEASE?
Yap it comes with the cam (in my case 5DII) and the main use is treating RAW. As Photoshop never gives backwards updates on RAW formats, they force you to always buy the next version. I'm happy with CS2 but it doesn't handle CR2 files. DPP does just that. I use it for adjusting the WB, the CA and a little bit of sharpening (1) as it is better from RAW. I also use it to adjust the exposure since the RAW has a larger dynamic range than a 16-bit TIF and certainly an 8-bit JPG. You need to export this to 16 bit TIF and open it in PS. Don't save the edited RAW!

Especially when you have a Canon lens, the CA (fringe) reduction in DPP is superb and automatic since the program contains the lens profile. Stay away from all the sliders in that case.

Especially in your landscapes, you will love the high dynamic range and export 2 TIFS, one with emphasis on the shadows, one with emphasis on the highlights. Import both in PS, in 2 layers, and selectively erase at wish to obtain some pseudo-HDR.
PS:  doesn't this also have some video capability?
No DPP is only for still raws.

Thanks FD (and Chia).  Great info.
FD ... I don't have photoshop, only photoshop elements.  I'm REALLY interested in what you said about HDR.  Does it do or simulate doing any tone mapping?  I'm cheap and trying to avoid replacing my HDR software that got lost in the computer transfer.
Chia:  I'm using Photoshop Premiere Elements for video.  The computer is pretty good with i7 processor and 8gb memory.  I think, however, that my video/graphics card is only 1gb ram?

FD:  would it be feasible to do all my CR2 editing in DPP and saving to JPG for upload?  IE: not use PSE at all?  Would that reduce my artifacts rejections?

Thanks for the info and any other advice anyone may care to offer/discuss.  Maybe we can all get more use out of DPP.   :P

PS:  FD, did you check with Adobe for a CR2 plugin?  I found one for my PSE8 and it was a fairly simple install.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2010, 15:10 by WarrenPrice »

« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2010, 17:01 »
0
FD ... I don't have photoshop, only photoshop elements.  I'm REALLY interested in what you said about HDR.  Does it do or simulate doing any tone mapping?  I'm cheap and trying to avoid replacing my HDR software that got lost in the computer transfer.

1 - It doesn't matter, PE or PS. You will have to export the images in TIF from DPP anyways (write to disk), so whatever can read TIF is fine.

2 - It's not really HDR but you can exploit the fact that a RAW (depending on cam) has more dynamic range as a JPG. You can export TIF-d with all the shadows well structured (highlights are blown out, histogram clipped at the right) and a TIF-l (all highlights recovered, shadow a dark patch, histogram clipped at the left).
Since DPP doesn't have layers, you'll have to selectively erase in PS. I don't know if it would work in a HDR program but you could try.

3 - Losing registered software is never a problem. You can send them an email with your info and they will replace it.
FD:  would it be feasible to do all my CR2 editing in DPP and saving to JPG for upload?  IE: not use PSE at all?  Would that reduce my artifacts rejections?

1 - You could do that if your image is OK in DPP, but personally I love to tweak always in layers (hence PS), and then you're better off in TIF. JPG is a lossy format and it should always be the last step before uploading, with no way back. Don't reopen it or you get generation loss. TIF is lossless and keep that as your master copy. You can reopen/save it an endless number of times (for retweaking) without loss. (see my compendium under lossy and TIF).

2 - I don't see how skipping a step can reduce artifacts, but probably you mean starting from RAW. Well RAW has more info (dynamic range) than JPG, so if you stretch RAW out in under- or overexposed shots, you will get less artifacts than if you do the same in the reduced JPG. Of course, RAW isn't a miracle - but it's a way to save borderline shots. Most of the time you will get pixelation or artifacts when you stretch the luminance range of an under- or overexposed shot, or one with too little contrast (the histogram flocking together in the middle). If you stretch that in PS, you will "cook" new info that wasn't there and that's perceived as pixelation.
Not only by stretching luminance you'll get it, but also by too much saturation, USM mask, and especially oversharpening.
Thanks for the info and any other advice anyone may care to offer/discuss.  Maybe we can all get more use out of DPP.   :P

Well you have it there, just try it out and play with it. I was surprised BaldricksTrousers used it too. Of course some people trust Lightroom but last year I saw a group of professional assignment photographers work with it and it's not my cup of tea for stock.
PS:  FD, did you check with Adobe for a CR2 plugin?  I found one for my PSE8 and it was a fairly simple install.

Any link?

« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2010, 17:19 »
0
It does seem crazy that the camera manufacturers don't let you have video editing software with their cameras.  I bought premiere elements 7 and have used it to make clips for the sites.

I only really use DPP to convert raw files to tiffs, adjusting exposure slightly when required.  I will have to look at it in more depth one day.

« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2010, 17:31 »
0
I only really use DPP to convert raw files to tiffs, adjusting exposure slightly when required.  I will have to look at it in more depth one day.
If you do that, you should certainly include the CA in your workflow. It's superb and it's just 15 sec more. I didn't do video yet on my 5DII, but I think I saw some video things when installing the 5DII software. Not sure. I had glitches in my recorded video but Richard (RT) told me it had to do with the type of my CSF card.


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
32 Replies
9012 Views
Last post June 07, 2008, 00:27
by chellyar
22 Replies
10903 Views
Last post December 09, 2011, 13:16
by RacePhoto
10 Replies
2881 Views
Last post August 04, 2012, 01:55
by Lagereek
7 Replies
2295 Views
Last post March 09, 2013, 08:33
by randymckown
0 Replies
1292 Views
Last post May 01, 2016, 08:42
by WaterView

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results