pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Most Saleable Video Settings on 5D Mark III  (Read 9711 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« on: November 01, 2013, 05:58 »
0
Any pro stock video sellers out there that can answer this...

Which are the best (most saleable) video settings for the 5D Mark III. Pal vs NTSC, framerate etc?

Perhaps I just answered it myself as the Shutterstock Video site says
Quote
We are asking that film clips try and abide by the NTSC standard of 29.97fps (frames per second) with a time limit no longer than 60 seconds.

http://submit.shutterstock.com/guidelines.mhtml

For quick referance here is the pond5 submit guidelines.
http://www.pond5.com/document/video_requirements.html

I'd still be interested to hear people's thoughts.


« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2013, 06:12 »
0
Any pro stock video sellers out there that can answer this...

Which are the best (most saleable) video settings for the 5D Mark III. Pal vs NTSC, framerate etc?

Perhaps I just answered it myself as the Shutterstock Video site says
Quote
We are asking that film clips try and abide by the NTSC standard of 29.97fps (frames per second) with a time limit no longer than 60 seconds.

http://submit.shutterstock.com/guidelines.mhtml

For quick referance here is the pond5 submit guidelines.
http://www.pond5.com/document/video_requirements.html

I'd still be interested to hear people's thoughts.



Hi,

my settings:

ISO 160, 320, 640, max 1250
Shutter 50
PAL
24 FPS for "movie effect"  or  25 FPS
Manual
AF is on LIVE MODE

I use MPEG Streamclip to convert  in PHOTO JPEG 90 % - 95 %

All accepted: SS, IS, P5

I am familiar with Magic lantern as well.
Great because of Zebras, Focus peak, Magic zoom...
Also Audio settings are great...

Kind regards


ACS

« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2013, 11:25 »
0
I would prefer Pal (it is the TV standard in where I live) and the highest possible frame rate (downscaling is easy but upscaling might be problematic).

Especially for still objects/scenes constant focus is important. To prevent hunting you can use manual focus or focus lock.

I think constant exposure is also important, so for most scenes I use manuel exposure or exposure lock.

Lowest possible iso is better like it is in the photography. But for dark scenes you can make it up, it is more tolerable in video than it is in photo.

Using a tripod is a must for most of the cases.

As far as I know it is using H264, so you have to convert it to pjpeg especially if you want to send IS and DT. For other sites, if you don't need any correction, you can send as it is.

BTW I am using Nikon and Sony, not a pro, started 10 months ago. These are what I learned so far, I just wanted to share.


jbarber873

« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2013, 13:14 »
0
  Pal vs NTSC is a tough one. I shoot NTSC ( short for never the same color) , but thats just because I'm US based. I have sold plenty in europe so I guess they can convert.
   Anyway, what I really wanted to say is, there are so many different ways to do things that you should just find a way that works for you and stick with it. It's easy to change a setting and then forget the next time you shoot that you did so, since there are so many menus to go through. As others have said, low asa is best, but you don't have the leeway to fix it later that you do in photoshop. The higher asa settings are really pretty good, but they won't put light where there isn't any.
  Tripod is key- you may think you can hold a camera steady, but you can't. Unless you have a really smooth tripod, don't try pans, as they just look amateurish. Same for zoom.
   I try to shoot at 29.97, so I use  1/60 sec as a shutter speed. ASA 200. Higher shutter speeds don't look right, at least to me. Plus if you use HMI lights you get a shutter roll ( here in the US anyway) because of the 60 cycle AC power. This can also happen with flourescents, such as kino-flo.
    If you have the ability to edit with vector scopes ( i.e. the virtual scopes in final cut) it can be a good idea to modify the camera settings to minimal contrast, saturation, no sharpening etc, with idea of capturing as much raw data as possible that gives you more leeway later. The footage will look awful until you adjust it, so don't do this if you are sending it straight through, as in mpeg streamclip.
    Output- I use photo jpeg at 90%, millions of color, no keyframes, square pixels, audio 48khz, 16bit
This may or may not be right, but it works.
    Don't cut you clips right to the part you think will be used to save disk space. Editors need a second or two on either end if they want to cross dissolve, so give them the footage.
    A great resource is Philip Bloom's blog at Prolost dot com.  It's become more commercial over the years, but if you dig there are good discussions on camera settings. For more on asa settings and quality, google "zacuto shootout 2010". It's a very interesting comparison of film and dslr's.


« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2013, 07:42 »
0
Any pro stock video sellers out there that can answer this...

Which are the best (most saleable) video settings for the 5D Mark III. Pal vs NTSC, framerate etc?

Perhaps I just answered it myself as the Shutterstock Video site says
Quote
We are asking that film clips try and abide by the NTSC standard of 29.97fps (frames per second) with a time limit no longer than 60 seconds.

http://submit.shutterstock.com/guidelines.mhtml

For quick referance here is the pond5 submit guidelines.
http://www.pond5.com/document/video_requirements.html

I'd still be interested to hear people's thoughts.


I'm wondering, do you have to apply for video submission at SS like you do with stills? Or is is open if you are an approved contributor of stills?

« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2013, 08:22 »
0
I'm wondering, do you have to apply for video submission at SS like you do with stills? Or is is open if you are an approved contributor of stills?

It's open;  just upload videos and they will be inspected.  You don't even have to be an approved stills contributor, I'm not.

« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2013, 08:25 »
+1
1080 at 30p You can always go from 30p to 24p but not the other way around! I have pushed my ISO to 3200 and down resized the files to 720p and it get accepted every time. Use good glass and learn to nail focus because on a full frame it can be tricky.

« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2013, 09:13 »
0
I'm wondering, do you have to apply for video submission at SS like you do with stills? Or is is open if you are an approved contributor of stills?

It's open;  just upload videos and they will be inspected.  You don't even have to be an approved stills contributor, I'm not.

Cool. Thanks for the feedback.


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
9 Replies
5902 Views
Last post June 06, 2008, 12:59
by melking
20 Replies
21668 Views
Last post January 18, 2012, 08:10
by trek
5 Replies
9299 Views
Last post January 20, 2011, 15:57
by microstock4me
3 Replies
923 Views
Last post March 06, 2019, 06:58
by Brightontl
0 Replies
659 Views
Last post March 06, 2019, 07:01
by Brightontl

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results