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Author Topic: Sensor Cleaning  (Read 6489 times)

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« on: September 18, 2008, 02:23 »
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Do many of you have to clean your camera's sensor or have you got an effective anti dust system?
It appears the Olympus still leads the way in effectiveness.


« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2008, 02:44 »
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i don't think there will ever be a camera with no dust.

I use the copperhill method mostly - but a blower bulb thingy fixes 95% of the dust spots, for most people that is probably enough.


« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2008, 03:12 »
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I was dying with Canon 20D particularly because of dust. It ruined so many pictures.
I was happy to switch to 40D with the sensor-cleaning technology. It does not mean there is no dust at all, but it is way less dust then I got with 20D

« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2008, 03:00 »
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Thats right leaf, but if you use several lenses (that i do), you can get dust on the sensor. Since i use the Nikon D2Xs, ive less trouble with sensor dust (Nikon D200 was horrible). As  somebody knew, the D2Xs isnt the cheapest camera. I dont want to destroy my sensor, so i decided to bring it to inspection to a Nikon Service Point (or you can sent it). The price is nearly equal as if you use (e.g.) the sensor-dust system. If you bring it to Nikon Service Point, they also cleaning your body and you have the guarantee that all is okay. Normally you have to wait one day.

« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2008, 04:36 »
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The price is nearly equal as if you use (e.g.) the sensor-dust system. If you bring it to Nikon Service Point, they also cleaning your body and you have the guarantee that all is okay. Normally you have to wait one day.

which 'sensor-dust system' are you talking about.  The copperhill method costs about 32 cents per cleaning.

« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2008, 11:10 »
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Well, I personally use a method that is 100% free, without ANY risk (no liquid in contact with the sensor), 100% NATURAL technology and that you can do everytime you need it, and I think compatible with all : I clean sensors with bird's feathers.

Nothing better than that for me. I think you would find some informations if you googlize it, i'm lazy with my english these days. Yes, pigeons can be very usefull! (or other birds of course, with enough rigid feathers on top).
In fact, I do a little feather duster as you can see on this photo I just took.
Of course, you have to use the tool in the right direction...  :-\

« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2008, 15:44 »
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Hem, this was not a joke.
Or maybe are you all already aware of this method...  :o

Or maybe, the only interesting discussions here are based on frustration about rejections, sales always going slow, 2 month old agencies not selling images as shutterstock does, incredibly borning polls, etc etc...  :-\

« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2008, 16:01 »
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Tilo,

When I need this, I'll try one of my lovebirds' feather.  They won't like it, but....  ;D

Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2008, 16:03 »
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Hem, this was not a joke.
Or maybe are you all already aware of this method...  :o

Or maybe, the only interesting discussions here are based on frustration about rejections, sales always going slow, 2 month old agencies not selling images as shutterstock does, incredibly borning polls, etc etc...  :-\

Hmmm ... I'm not sure about this method.

I've watched birds taking dust baths, so I'll stick with my rocket blower thanks.   ;D

« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2008, 16:25 »
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 ;D thank you for not leaving me alone here.
btw, I personnaly use clean feathers sold for decoration or do-it-yourself purpose. But people using this method are increasing, and they are all very satisfied, as I am (doing it on 400D and 5D). And when I check by shooting a white paper at f22, the result is just perfect.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2008, 16:32 by tilo »

« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2008, 16:43 »
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Tilo,

When I need this, I'll try one of my lovebirds' feather.  They won't like it, but....  ;D

Regards,
Adelaide

The LOVEBIRDS
soon we'll be making another run
The LOVEBIRDS
promises something for everyone...


:D
Sorry madelaide, I could not resist!
« Last Edit: September 25, 2008, 16:45 by tilo »

« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2008, 16:46 »
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Sorry madelaide, I could not resist!

If only I could understand the joke!

Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #12 on: September 25, 2008, 16:49 »
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Hem, this was not a joke.
Or maybe are you all already aware of this method...  :o


Well I tought that this was not a serious method... :-X

What are the advantages of a natural feather vs pads that are designed for it?

I don't think that feathers were designed to clean sensor...  ;D

Claude

« Reply #13 on: September 25, 2008, 16:52 »
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Sorry madelaide, I could not resist!


If only I could understand the joke!

Regards,
Adelaide


 :-[
http://chezdophy.com/love_boat.htm

« Reply #14 on: September 25, 2008, 17:02 »
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Well I tought that this was not a serious method... :-X
Innovation is sometimes not serious at all...  ;)
« Last Edit: September 25, 2008, 17:05 by tilo »

« Reply #15 on: September 26, 2008, 07:08 »
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I've had a few dust marks on my 40D that I have put up with for a couple of months, but a couple of days ago I finally cleaned it with a sensor swab and Eclpse. It was the first time I've cleaned a sensor and it took 2 attempts to get it fully clean.
Having now cleaned it successfully, I won't be so concerned about cleaning it again in the future, but hopefully it won't be required very often.
I did try to get rid of the dust with blowers etc, but these spots were firmly stuck, so I decided a wet clean was the only option.

graficallyminded

« Reply #16 on: September 26, 2008, 16:32 »
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My 20D sensor is mad crusty.  I have to get a blower or something.

« Reply #17 on: September 27, 2008, 00:08 »
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I clean my sensors about every 2 months or so.
Need to do it..its a must!!!

I mean..the cloning or patch tool is ok..but i rather do my photo-shoots (clean and clean)
I usually just send my cameras to my regular "camera tech guyz" and they know how to clean it very well.
*!! i hate dust! They sort of always find a way to creep in the sensor.
:)

« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2008, 00:23 »
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I clean my sensor every couple of months with a dust blower and Sensor Pen.It is so easy, I don't know why I was worried the first time!
I also carry a Lens pen for quick lens clean ups.

« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2008, 23:32 »
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There are anti-static tools now available commercially that one can purchase and do a successful sensor cleaning on their own.  If you take the camera in to, say, the retailer I work for, you are charged $65 US but they clean the whole works - sensor, camera, etc.  Well, I can do all that myself, and I've cleaned several sensors at work with the appropriate tools.  An anti-static "pen" is an essential, but I also use a hurricane blower before the pen.  Works for me - at least so far, knock on wood!  (Portia knocks on her own head.)


 

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