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Author Topic: Sunrise time lapse tutorial  (Read 395 times)

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« on: May 27, 2019, 10:30 »
+2
How to shoot and post process time lapses at sunrise (and how to wake up early!).
With Lightroom and Lumetri Color in Adobe After Effects or Premiere Pro
https://youtu.be/6wJap1GDCsY


« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2019, 14:06 »
+1
Another excellent video - thx! I always make a point of watching your stuff as soon as I read about it here.  (I have a YouTube subscription, but honestly almost never check them for updates...)

However...  you always talk about using full manual.  I have taken that as gospel until last week. A cathedral in the middle of our town (Cuenca, Ecuador) was recently renovated, and has some spectacular lights.  Our living room window looks directly over it.  I tried doing a time-lapse on full manual, using exposure ramping, etc. Not a decent result among them. I was ready to give up... :(

Then, I thought "why not break the rules and let the camera figure out what is needed?"  I set ISO 100, white balance cloudy (it was, prior to sunset), and manual focus.  I then (horror!) set the camera to 'P' mode to let it decide on both aperture and shutter speed.  I let it fly for about 3 hours, used LRTimeLapse (an app you turned me onto, and which I now use for each and every time-lapse), and got this result:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ti-15BJBGoE&feature=youtu.be

Personally I love it, and don't think I could have gotten a better result with any amount of manual exposure, or ramping, or any other fooling around. This camera (Sony a7R3) does one heck of a good job in doing auto exposure.  I had already come to rely on 'P' for street photog, where I am run-and-gun and light changes dramatically from shot to shot. This was my first attempt at using it for time-lapse, but I suspect it won't be my last. :)

BTW, we are traveling to Chile for the eclipse in July.  I will be testing the VIEW+ (an intervalometer that claims to have ramping controls for eclipses) on one camera. A second camera will be set to 'P' as this sunset shot was done. 

Haven't decided how to set up the other two cameras.  Any specific suggestions? I will have two Sony a7R3, one Canon 5DM3 and one Canon 7DM2 along, with an assortment of lenses. At least one long lens (400mm) will track just the sun, and at least one lens (12-24mm) will do an overall scene view.  Still deciding on the last two though... (FWIW, my wife and I will be shooting, which each responsible for 2 cameras. I am not crazy enough to try to run all 4 at once in a one-time event like this!)

Oh yes, we have sheets of "eclipse filter material" that will be used to protect the sensors from being burned during the eclipse.

« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2019, 15:04 »
+1
Another excellent video - thx! I always make a point of watching your stuff as soon as I read about it here.  (I have a YouTube subscription, but honestly almost never check them for updates...)

However...  you always talk about using full manual.  I have taken that as gospel until last week. A cathedral in the middle of our town (Cuenca, Ecuador) was recently renovated, and has some spectacular lights.  Our living room window looks directly over it.  I tried doing a time-lapse on full manual, using exposure ramping, etc. Not a decent result among them. I was ready to give up... :(

Then, I thought "why not break the rules and let the camera figure out what is needed?"  I set ISO 100, white balance cloudy (it was, prior to sunset), and manual focus.  I then (horror!) set the camera to 'P' mode to let it decide on both aperture and shutter speed.  I let it fly for about 3 hours, used LRTimeLapse (an app you turned me onto, and which I now use for each and every time-lapse), and got this result:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ti-15BJBGoE&feature=youtu.be

Personally I love it, and don't think I could have gotten a better result with any amount of manual exposure, or ramping, or any other fooling around. This camera (Sony a7R3) does one heck of a good job in doing auto exposure.  I had already come to rely on 'P' for street photog, where I am run-and-gun and light changes dramatically from shot to shot. This was my first attempt at using it for time-lapse, but I suspect it won't be my last. :)

BTW, we are traveling to Chile for the eclipse in July.  I will be testing the VIEW+ (an intervalometer that claims to have ramping controls for eclipses) on one camera. A second camera will be set to 'P' as this sunset shot was done. 

Haven't decided how to set up the other two cameras.  Any specific suggestions? I will have two Sony a7R3, one Canon 5DM3 and one Canon 7DM2 along, with an assortment of lenses. At least one long lens (400mm) will track just the sun, and at least one lens (12-24mm) will do an overall scene view.  Still deciding on the last two though... (FWIW, my wife and I will be shooting, which each responsible for 2 cameras. I am not crazy enough to try to run all 4 at once in a one-time event like this!)

Oh yes, we have sheets of "eclipse filter material" that will be used to protect the sensors from being burned during the eclipse.

I love it too! Thanks for sharing the link and your other ideas.

You've inspired me to try that here in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA where I just happen to have a great view of the St. Francis Cathedral on the Plaza. Both morning and evening light can be wonderful, so   :)

« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2019, 09:13 »
0
Another excellent video - thx! I always make a point of watching your stuff as soon as I read about it here.  (I have a YouTube subscription, but honestly almost never check them for updates...)

However...  you always talk about using full manual.  I have taken that as gospel until last week. A cathedral in the middle of our town (Cuenca, Ecuador) was recently renovated, and has some spectacular lights.  Our living room window looks directly over it.  I tried doing a time-lapse on full manual, using exposure ramping, etc. Not a decent result among them. I was ready to give up... :(

Then, I thought "why not break the rules and let the camera figure out what is needed?"  I set ISO 100, white balance cloudy (it was, prior to sunset), and manual focus.  I then (horror!) set the camera to 'P' mode to let it decide on both aperture and shutter speed.  I let it fly for about 3 hours, used LRTimeLapse (an app you turned me onto, and which I now use for each and every time-lapse), and got this result:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ti-15BJBGoE&feature=youtu.be

Personally I love it, and don't think I could have gotten a better result with any amount of manual exposure, or ramping, or any other fooling around. This camera (Sony a7R3) does one heck of a good job in doing auto exposure.  I had already come to rely on 'P' for street photog, where I am run-and-gun and light changes dramatically from shot to shot. This was my first attempt at using it for time-lapse, but I suspect it won't be my last. :)

BTW, we are traveling to Chile for the eclipse in July.  I will be testing the VIEW+ (an intervalometer that claims to have ramping controls for eclipses) on one camera. A second camera will be set to 'P' as this sunset shot was done. 

Haven't decided how to set up the other two cameras.  Any specific suggestions? I will have two Sony a7R3, one Canon 5DM3 and one Canon 7DM2 along, with an assortment of lenses. At least one long lens (400mm) will track just the sun, and at least one lens (12-24mm) will do an overall scene view.  Still deciding on the last two though... (FWIW, my wife and I will be shooting, which each responsible for 2 cameras. I am not crazy enough to try to run all 4 at once in a one-time event like this!)

Oh yes, we have sheets of "eclipse filter material" that will be used to protect the sensors from being burned during the eclipse.
Many thanks for your kind words.
Your timelapse is beautiful. Fantastic light.
Well, I always say not to use auto focus and auto WB. Regarding auto exposure, in certain occasions I am not against: I even did a couple of video where I use Aperture priority and SS priority.
Good luck for your eclipse in Chile and post some timelapses.
Generally with shots of the sun, the danger is to overexpose. It is much better to rather underexpose; since you have several camera, try several exposure settings

« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2019, 02:59 »
0
Another excellent video - thx! I always make a point of watching your stuff as soon as I read about it here.  (I have a YouTube subscription, but honestly almost never check them for updates...)

However...  you always talk about using full manual.  I have taken that as gospel until last week. A cathedral in the middle of our town (Cuenca, Ecuador) was recently renovated, and has some spectacular lights.  Our living room window looks directly over it.  I tried doing a time-lapse on full manual, using exposure ramping, etc. Not a decent result among them. I was ready to give up... :(

Then, I thought "why not break the rules and let the camera figure out what is needed?"  I set ISO 100, white balance cloudy (it was, prior to sunset), and manual focus.  I then (horror!) set the camera to 'P' mode to let it decide on both aperture and shutter speed.  I let it fly for about 3 hours, used LRTimeLapse (an app you turned me onto, and which I now use for each and every time-lapse), and got this result:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ti-15BJBGoE&feature=youtu.be

Personally I love it, and don't think I could have gotten a better result with any amount of manual exposure, or ramping, or any other fooling around. This camera (Sony a7R3) does one heck of a good job in doing auto exposure.  I had already come to rely on 'P' for street photog, where I am run-and-gun and light changes dramatically from shot to shot. This was my first attempt at using it for time-lapse, but I suspect it won't be my last. :)

BTW, we are traveling to Chile for the eclipse in July.  I will be testing the VIEW+ (an intervalometer that claims to have ramping controls for eclipses) on one camera. A second camera will be set to 'P' as this sunset shot was done. 

Haven't decided how to set up the other two cameras.  Any specific suggestions? I will have two Sony a7R3, one Canon 5DM3 and one Canon 7DM2 along, with an assortment of lenses. At least one long lens (400mm) will track just the sun, and at least one lens (12-24mm) will do an overall scene view.  Still deciding on the last two though... (FWIW, my wife and I will be shooting, which each responsible for 2 cameras. I am not crazy enough to try to run all 4 at once in a one-time event like this!)

Oh yes, we have sheets of "eclipse filter material" that will be used to protect the sensors from being burned during the eclipse.

I love it too! Thanks for sharing the link and your other ideas.

You've inspired me to try that here in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA where I just happen to have a great view of the St. Francis Cathedral on the Plaza. Both morning and evening light can be wonderful, so   :)
Thank you Martha,
Santa Fe is a fantastic place for timelapses.
Such an atmospheric place, also the air from the desert is so clean.
I would love to spend a few days shooting there

« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2019, 08:06 »
+2
Beautifully done, Brightonti! Thank you for the insightful tutorial!

My "bottom-line" question would be: Are you finding that the pay-off is worth the effort? So much time spent scouting the location, getting the sequence - providing everything works as planned during that 1-3 hour process - and then taking it home and spending more time working the frames before uploading it to multiple agencies and hoping there's a demand for that particular TL clip.

« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2019, 10:54 »
0
Beautifully done, Brightonti! Thank you for the insightful tutorial!

My "bottom-line" question would be: Are you finding that the pay-off is worth the effort? So much time spent scouting the location, getting the sequence - providing everything works as planned during that 1-3 hour process - and then taking it home and spending more time working the frames before uploading it to multiple agencies and hoping there's a demand for that particular TL clip.
Thank you!
This is an excellent question.
I am quite happy with my sales in the different agencies, but I must admit that sunset and sunrises have not sold very much as yet. Other timelapses, much easier to make are my best sellers so far.
But I still love doing sunsets and, if I manage to wake up, sunrises


 

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