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Author Topic: Using drones for stock video even though it is illegal.  (Read 84330 times)

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op

« Reply #50 on: October 23, 2015, 09:18 »
+2
Getty now requires drone pilot license and permits for any drone footage...


« Reply #51 on: October 23, 2015, 11:33 »
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In the U.S. Getty now requires proof of an exemption granted by the FAA for your commercial use of a drone.

op

« Reply #52 on: October 23, 2015, 12:21 »
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Not even in the US..

« Reply #53 on: October 23, 2015, 13:24 »
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Getty now requires drone pilot license and permits for any drone footage...
What happens if you don't have the appropriate documents? Could the FAA fine Getty? The UAV operator?

op

« Reply #54 on: October 23, 2015, 13:32 »
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They don't accept footages without those documents.

« Reply #55 on: October 23, 2015, 13:46 »
+1
Getty now requires drone pilot license and permits for any drone footage...
What happens if you don't have the appropriate documents? Could the FAA fine Getty? The UAV operator?
Google FAA drone fines. There are reports of fines up to $10,000. In one case they deemed posting a drone video on YouTube commercial use because of an ad linked to the video. In another case selling stock images of cityscapes was deemed commercial and a heavy fine was assessed.

« Reply #56 on: October 23, 2015, 14:19 »
0
Getty now requires drone pilot license and permits for any drone footage...
What happens if you don't have the appropriate documents? Could the FAA fine Getty? The UAV operator?
Google FAA drone fines. There are reports of fines up to $10,000. In one case they deemed posting a drone video on YouTube commercial use because of an ad linked to the video. In another case selling stock images of cityscapes was deemed commercial and a heavy fine was assessed.
That's what I was wondering. Thanks.

« Reply #57 on: October 25, 2015, 17:04 »
0
This is all bursting my bubble. I was looking into expanding my video to drone footage but the hoops one has to jump through to make footage "compliant" will only get more complicated. And to have a license and having to register will cost money just to be able to use the drone. Red tape, safety and overall government greed combine to make a powerful formula to discourage or prevent legitimate drone use.

« Reply #58 on: October 25, 2015, 17:10 »
+3
Mantis, I don't think this is a government greed thing. They have the potential to be quite dangerous and are proving to be just that. I'm sure the government would like to forget about them as they have enough to do. But unless properly dealt with, they will eventually bring down something a lot bigger than them.

« Reply #59 on: October 25, 2015, 17:26 »
+2
Mantis, I don't think this is a government greed thing. They have the potential to be quite dangerous and are proving to be just that. I'm sure the government would like to forget about them as they have enough to do. But unless properly dealt with, they will eventually bring down something a lot bigger than them.

I agree that safety is a necessity, which means properly using your drone in compliance with practical guidelines.  The idiots who are creating a mess and misusing drones, though, will (or already have) triggered a governmental response. The government here in the USA is greedy. They will create unrealistic ways to levy fees around registration, training and/or licensing as a new revenue stream. Mark my words, the US government will make owning a drone lucrative for them as "an aside" to true safety and responsible flying.

So I do agree with you fully about responsible use, but I also see our government either making it easy to own a drone but impossible to fly it unless you are willing to pay up or seeing drone ownership as a means to new revenue.  But I suppose that's a different story.

« Reply #60 on: February 12, 2017, 00:26 »
+1
Ive been flying quadcopters for a little over three years. Most of that time was spent on cheap toy grade quads. I started with a Syma X1 - full manual control / no gps. First few months of flying weer really tough - I had three fly aways with three seperate Syma X1s and none of them were ever found. Later on, I acquired a Syma X8C which Ive had for a while now. It's probably the cheapest quad that can lift a GoPro. Ive done a few aerial videos with the Syma X8C and GoPro combination though it's not really suitable for stock footage - no gimbal and the landing gear is visible in the frame (despite using DJI wide skids.) Still great fun though. Two of my videos can be seen here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9390lm0JXIc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKgMWGXqDxs

Maybe one day, I can purchase a more expensive quad for stock footage. I do have a second hand DJI Phantom 2 which came with a bad battery. No gimbal though. As for legalities, no problem here as I am in Australia. In this country, you can fly a UAV for commercial gain without a license as long as the craft weighs less than 2kg.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2017, 00:29 by dragonblade »

« Reply #61 on: February 12, 2017, 02:39 »
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Old Thread Alert!

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« Reply #62 on: February 12, 2017, 04:39 »
+1
Old Thread Alert!

An old 'un, but a good 'un! 

« Reply #63 on: February 12, 2017, 06:02 »
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Yes, it would be interesting to hear updates about it from different parts of the world.
Here in the UK the situation seems particularly relaxed at the moment. Never had any problems, even in urban areas, but I am very strict about respecting the few rules

« Reply #64 on: February 13, 2017, 12:13 »
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Canada is fairly straight forward.
Have insurance, meet the exemptions from SFOC and don't fly too close to airports or restricted zones and you're all good.

« Reply #65 on: February 13, 2017, 13:05 »
+1
Yes, it would be interesting to hear updates about it from different parts of the world.
Here in the UK the situation seems particularly relaxed at the moment. Never had any problems, even in urban areas, but I am very strict about respecting the few rules


Not that relaxed.
"You must be in possession of a Permission issued by the CAA before you conduct any aerial work with your drone."
http://www.caa.co.uk/Commercial-industry/Aircraft/Unmanned-aircraft/Unmanned-Aircraft/

For none commercial purposes.
http://dronesafe.uk/


« Reply #66 on: February 13, 2017, 14:57 »
+1
On the other hand France is the most strict on the planet.
You must have a licence after three weeks (!) of intense training. communicate to the authorities your purchase of the drone, start a company, scarify 12 virgins before you can even put the thing in the air.
Afterwards you need to ask permission with a detailed map of where you want to fly every single time!
And most places are forbidden anyway

« Reply #67 on: April 14, 2017, 17:46 »
0
Quick question:
what if I'm from a country A and get all the permits I need to fly a drone commercially, if I travel to country B will I need to get different permits?

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« Reply #68 on: April 14, 2017, 19:17 »
0
Quick question:
what if I'm from a country A and get all the permits I need to fly a drone commercially, if I travel to country B will I need to get different permits?

More than likely, yes.

« Reply #69 on: April 14, 2017, 19:30 »
+1
Quick question:
what if I'm from a country A and get all the permits I need to fly a drone commercially, if I travel to country B will I need to get different permits?

Of course, whenever you visit another country you have to obey all the laws of the land

« Reply #70 on: October 18, 2017, 08:52 »
0
Hi,

Anyone can point me to a site where I can read the German regulations for drones and the commercial use of the images/footage made with it? I have found some myself, just not sure about the right ones?

Thank you! Maybe an official site?

« Reply #71 on: October 18, 2017, 09:36 »
+1
Since someone revived this post....  A jet hit a drone this week in Quebec.  It didn't bring it down but it really agitated Canada's Transportation Minister.  If a goose can bring down a jet, so can a drone.  I don't really see licensing as a money grab by governments, the owners of these things really need the education that comes with getting a license.  The only thing worse than losing a loved one in a crash would be the burden of guilt of uneducated drone operator who brought down the aircraft because they didn't know they were too close to an airport or flying too high.

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/drone-collision-canadian-passenger-plane-063043433.html

« Reply #72 on: October 18, 2017, 10:17 »
0


 

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