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Author Topic: 2022 Adobe Stock Creative Trends livestream today  (Read 1697 times)

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SVH

« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2022, 13:56 »
0
Great stuff Mat and thanks for the info!

I would like to propose a session where Adobe explains to it's contributors how ranking works within searches of clients. It would be an honest and open gesture to the contributors what to expect in the collaboration we have together. It would also give tools to the contributor to submit better quality or other content if they would only know what drives the search algorithm or at least know what the components are. It probably will help Adobe as well.

« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2022, 14:20 »
+3
Great stuff Mat and thanks for the info!

I would like to propose a session where Adobe explains to it's contributors how ranking works within searches of clients. It would be an honest and open gesture to the contributors what to expect in the collaboration we have together. It would also give tools to the contributor to submit better quality or other content if they would only know what drives the search algorithm or at least know what the components are. It probably will help Adobe as well.

Thanks for the question, but I don't think the ingredients of the secret search sauce can be revealed. I've tried to crack the code :)

Here is the recipe for contributor success that I have been able to reverse engineer:

-Preheat the oven by creating top level content on a regular basis that speaks to current and upcoming trends (this is why today's livestream is so important for contributors in my opinion.)

-Add the following in no particular order:

      -One teaspoon containing at least 15-25 relevant keywords
      -1/4 cup containing around 80 characters for a descriptive title
      -Two cups of submissions at regular intervals throughout the year.
 
That's it! After that, the plate leaves the kitchen and is served up to the customers out front. If they like what is on the menu, they order it and consume it. If they are pleased with the result, they come back for more and the process continues.

Can you tell that I'm hungry right now?

-Mat Hayward

SVH

« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2022, 14:49 »
0
Thanks Mat for your funny and amazingly quick reply.

I guess we will never know what makes the clock tick although I don't see the secrecy in it.

I assume your measurements are not to be taken that serious (relatively speaking).

Just one final quick question. I saw an article (handed to me by Uncle Pete) from an engineer of Adobe telling they revise a place of a picture according to a formula which looks at your ranking and sales. So they expect a photo to sell better if it's on the first row then one on the 18th row for example. So the photo on the first row will get a lower score if has the same number of sales then a photo on that 18th row. The photo of the 18th row will move up and the one on the first row will move down.

Is that something you can say is still an extra ingredient on top of your recipe? And is age also not playing an important factor in this all?

« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2022, 15:41 »
+1
Great stuff Mat and thanks for the info!

I would like to propose a session where Adobe explains to it's contributors how ranking works within searches of clients. It would be an honest and open gesture to the contributors what to expect in the collaboration we have together. It would also give tools to the contributor to submit better quality or other content if they would only know what drives the search algorithm or at least know what the components are. It probably will help Adobe as well.

Thanks for the question, but I don't think the ingredients of the secret search sauce can be revealed. I've tried to crack the code :)

Here is the recipe for contributor success that I have been able to reverse engineer:

-Preheat the oven by creating top level content on a regular basis that speaks to current and upcoming trends (this is why today's livestream is so important for contributors in my opinion.)

-Add the following in no particular order:

      -One teaspoon containing at least 15-25 relevant keywords
      -1/4 cup containing around 80 characters for a descriptive title
      -Two cups of submissions at regular intervals throughout the year.
 
That's it! After that, the plate leaves the kitchen and is served up to the customers out front. If they like what is on the menu, they order it and consume it. If they are pleased with the result, they come back for more and the process continues.

Can you tell that I'm hungry right now?

-Mat Hayward

I like that. Mat, aside from the beard and the same haircut, I think we have the same sense of humor  ;)
I'm more in the editorial field, after all.
When can you finally submit an editorial meal that also features a spoonful of people?
Is there anything in the pipeline?
« Last Edit: January 13, 2022, 16:06 by RalfLiebhold »

« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2022, 18:22 »
+3
Great stuff Mat and thanks for the info!

I would like to propose a session where Adobe explains to it's contributors how ranking works within searches of clients. It would be an honest and open gesture to the contributors what to expect in the collaboration we have together. It would also give tools to the contributor to submit better quality or other content if they would only know what drives the search algorithm or at least know what the components are. It probably will help Adobe as well.

Thanks for the question, but I don't think the ingredients of the secret search sauce can be revealed. I've tried to crack the code :)

Here is the recipe for contributor success that I have been able to reverse engineer:

-Preheat the oven by creating top level content on a regular basis that speaks to current and upcoming trends (this is why today's livestream is so important for contributors in my opinion.)

-Add the following in no particular order:

      -One teaspoon containing at least 15-25 relevant keywords
      -1/4 cup containing around 80 characters for a descriptive title
      -Two cups of submissions at regular intervals throughout the year.
 
That's it! After that, the plate leaves the kitchen and is served up to the customers out front. If they like what is on the menu, they order it and consume it. If they are pleased with the result, they come back for more and the process continues.

Can you tell that I'm hungry right now?

-Mat Hayward

I like that. Mat, aside from the beard and the same haircut, I think we have the same sense of humor  ;)
I'm more in the editorial field, after all.
When can you finally submit an editorial meal that also features a spoonful of people?
Is there anything in the pipeline?

It sounds like you are a very funny person!

Currently, as you know we are serving only an appetizer of editorial consisting of illustrative content with no people. A request has been submitted to the chef for future specials to include all traditional types of editorial content, however, he has not indicated whether this will be on the menu any time in the immediate future.

Your reservation has been confirmed. We look forward to your stock submissions in 2022.

-Mat Hayward

 

« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2022, 18:35 »
+2
Thanks Mat for your funny and amazingly quick reply.

I guess we will never know what makes the clock tick although I don't see the secrecy in it.

I assume your measurements are not to be taken that serious (relatively speaking).

Just one final quick question. I saw an article (handed to me by Uncle Pete) from an engineer of Adobe telling they revise a place of a picture according to a formula which looks at your ranking and sales. So they expect a photo to sell better if it's on the first row then one on the 18th row for example. So the photo on the first row will get a lower score if has the same number of sales then a photo on that 18th row. The photo of the 18th row will move up and the one on the first row will move down.

Is that something you can say is still an extra ingredient on top of your recipe? And is age also not playing an important factor in this all?

Your guess is as good as mine (or Pete's). I think it's a safe bet that in many cases, the closer you are to the top of search results, the higher your likelihood of getting your content seen. I believe some people take the path of least resistance. If they can find an image or video that is "good enough" for their needs on page one, then they might stop there. I have spoken with stock buyers who spend a great amount of time doing exhaustive searches that go many, many pages deep with multiple search terms to find the perfect asset. I think it really comes down to the need of the customer, is good enough, good enough? Or do they need the perfect image? Lately, in my personal contributor account I have been seeing a lot of sales of images that are more than 10 years old and have to be buried very deep in search so who knows. It's also important to note that keywords aren't the only search method. Image search is surfacing content in different ways too. The morale of the story is if your content isn't on the top line on page one of every keyword you've added, you can still make sales.

I believe there are many variables involved in how your content is surfaced. Not the least of which is the order you add your keywords. SPEND THE TIME LISTING GOOD, RELEVANT KEYWORDS IN ORDER OF RELEVANCE to maximize your visibility. Besides creating exceptional content, this is the most control you have over the placement of your work in search. Don't take the path of least resistance when it comes to keywording (and adding titles) your content.

-Mat

« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2022, 18:38 »
+1
Well as a lowly busboy working part time shifts all I can say is I appreciate any tips front of house cares to share!

SVH

« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2022, 02:56 »
0
Thanks Mat for your funny and amazingly quick reply.

I guess we will never know what makes the clock tick although I don't see the secrecy in it.

I assume your measurements are not to be taken that serious (relatively speaking).

Just one final quick question. I saw an article (handed to me by Uncle Pete) from an engineer of Adobe telling they revise a place of a picture according to a formula which looks at your ranking and sales. So they expect a photo to sell better if it's on the first row then one on the 18th row for example. So the photo on the first row will get a lower score if has the same number of sales then a photo on that 18th row. The photo of the 18th row will move up and the one on the first row will move down.

Is that something you can say is still an extra ingredient on top of your recipe? And is age also not playing an important factor in this all?

Your guess is as good as mine (or Pete's). I think it's a safe bet that in many cases, the closer you are to the top of search results, the higher your likelihood of getting your content seen. I believe some people take the path of least resistance. If they can find an image or video that is "good enough" for their needs on page one, then they might stop there. I have spoken with stock buyers who spend a great amount of time doing exhaustive searches that go many, many pages deep with multiple search terms to find the perfect asset. I think it really comes down to the need of the customer, is good enough, good enough? Or do they need the perfect image? Lately, in my personal contributor account I have been seeing a lot of sales of images that are more than 10 years old and have to be buried very deep in search so who knows. It's also important to note that keywords aren't the only search method. Image search is surfacing content in different ways too. The morale of the story is if your content isn't on the top line on page one of every keyword you've added, you can still make sales.

I believe there are many variables involved in how your content is surfaced. Not the least of which is the order you add your keywords. SPEND THE TIME LISTING GOOD, RELEVANT KEYWORDS IN ORDER OF RELEVANCE to maximize your visibility. Besides creating exceptional content, this is the most control you have over the placement of your work in search. Don't take the path of least resistance when it comes to keywording (and adding titles) your content.

-Mat

Thanks Mat for getting back and answering my questions. Very much appreciated. It's not exactly what I hoped for, but still.

Have a nice weekend!

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2022, 09:59 »
+1
I have no personal guess, only what I got from the Webinars that Mat hosted, and taking notes, and then re-watching for accuracy, and taking more notes. This goes back to something I learned in college... take notes if you are actually going to study something, or just go on memory if you aren't serious. The same applies to playing golf, creating Microstock that sells, taking photos, or How The Search works on stock sites.  ;)

Here's the link to the article I sent to SVH. It has been posted here before but now and then, someone new comes to the forum and honestly can't go back through 15 years of posts to find every little tidbit of information.

https://medium.com/adobetech/evaluating-addressing-position-bias-in-adobe-stock-search-9807b11ee268

Using AI and Machine Learning to Overcome Position Bias within Adobe Stock Search
- By Fengbin Chen
Co-written with Judy Massuda

I make no claims for any original thoughts on the advise directly from Adobe Webinars or the article. I just read, collect and analyze.

Point of answering what no site tells us, how the search actually works, in detail. Aside from the obvious, that someone would then design their data to play the search for position and create a biased search in terms of what the customers are actually trying to achieve. If everyone knows and everyone plays the game of tricking the search, no one gets ahead and it makes the whole idea of a controlled search, invalid. Read the article? Being first helps, but it's not going to make a bad or useless image get sale. I'll never understand why people get so obsessed with their images being first, trying to trick or play the system, instead of making the best images that buyers want?

Knowing the essential rules (or the recipe  8) )  is more than enough to keep us all on even footing and providing a fair and balance opportunity for every contributor. Which also gives the best honest, equal, search results for a buyer.



Jif is peanut butter GIF is an image format or container. They are both pronounced the same (even if I'm going to continue to be wrong myself and say Ghif)

Its pronounced jif, not gif  Steve Wilhite - the programmer who introduced the format in 1987. End of that discussion?


 

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