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Author Topic: Fotolia actually pays up to 105% for pictures  (Read 7975 times)

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« on: December 10, 2012, 09:49 »
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Fotolia response to my question on how they calculate their payout for Contributors cashing out: 1 credit = $1.00 Current best offer is $0.74 a credit.

Let's do the math.

A picture cost, lets say, 30 credits. They say the highest possible photo royalty rate is 63%. Royalty may get as high as $18.90. Lowest possible price is $22,20. In such scenario you royalty is actually 85% of what the customer paid.

A video file cost, lets say, 75 credits. They say the highest possible video royalty rate is 49%. Royalty may get as high as $36.75. Lowest possible price is $55.5. In such scenario your royalty is actually 66%

Why not advertize it?

Other thoughts on targoszstock.blogspot.com

105% came with this reply

http://www.microstockgroup.com/fotolia-com/fotolia-is-actually-paying-up-to-85-for-pictures-and-66-for-footage-without-ad/msg284508/#msg284508
« Last Edit: December 12, 2012, 02:57 by targoszstock »


« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2012, 10:01 »
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I think you will find that it is a lot more complicated than that and a lot less favourable to the videographer than you think.

Last time I worked it out, they were paying as little as 12% but the answer you get depends on whether you want to use best possible outcome, worst possible outcome or something in between.

« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2012, 10:13 »
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make sure you join them on an european url (e.g. http://en.fotolia.com/) or you might end up getting paid in $ instead in EUR and yes they won't change it and yes that means another cut :(
« Last Edit: December 10, 2012, 10:36 by luissantos84 »

Poncke

« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2012, 10:22 »
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A sale for 1 credit gives me 23 cent so thats a 23% royality in my balance book.

@ luis, I didnt know that. I get paid in $ so the loss is a few buck in the Paypal conversion. Do you know what the payout per credit is in euros? 1 credit = 1$ but I dont know the euros

« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2012, 10:36 »
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You are exactly right, it works both ways. If your file is purchased with cheap credits, you get a higher percentage of the sales price. If the credits were expensive you are getting ripped off, and you are made believe it is always 30% or more.

With currency conversions, there is always someone else in line for profit. I think it is like this with every agency, isn't it?

« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2012, 10:50 »
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With currency conversions, there is always someone else in line for profit. I think it is like this with every agency, isn't it?

no because FT is paying to many contributors in Pound or Euro or maybe other, pretty much they will think you live in the US if you register your account using a US url even if you live in Europe (and there is no way back, its written in their terms) which makes another cut, its a silent cut of more 18% ;D

I am not sure but I think:

EUR - 1 credit - 1 EUR (I am sure)

the pound was discussed here a while ago but I don't seem to find it, I believe it was around 1.20 EUR

« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2012, 11:55 »
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I registered via Fotolia.co.uk and (last time I looked) one credit was equal to 0.75 GBP, which strikes me as being a better rate than those getting US$ (though things can obviously fluctuate all the time). Regards, David.

« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2012, 12:07 »
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I registered via Fotolia.co.uk and (last time I looked) one credit was equal to 0.75 GBP, which strikes me as being a better rate than those getting US$ (though things can obviously fluctuate all the time). Regards, David.

a lot better rate :)

we (europeans) should have 1000 EUR not 1000$ which are 773 EUR turning into a 227 EUR lose or a 22.7% cut

only 9.1% of my sales come from the US

« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2012, 14:49 »
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What you guys are saying is, regardless of the purchase currency, if you registered an account in UK than for your checkout 1credit = 0.75GBP?

« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2012, 14:59 »
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What you guys are saying is, regardless of the purchase currency, if you registered an account in UK than for your checkout 1credit = 0.75GBP?

register where you have more to gain, I would go for pound if I knew this more than 3 years ago >:(

Poncke

« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2012, 15:03 »
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And this cant be changed? Feck. I wish I had known/.

« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2012, 15:09 »
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And this cant be changed? Feck. I wish I had known/.

there are many in the same situation, FT is pretty smart

« Reply #12 on: December 10, 2012, 15:16 »
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What you guys are saying is, regardless of the purchase currency, if you registered an account in UK than for your checkout 1credit = 0.75GBP?

register where you have more to gain, I would go for pound if I knew this more than 3 years ago >:(

Wouldn't work. I joined the uk site ( I am in Canada), and they quickly moved my account to us site. So they can and will move your account and the way you're paid if it benefits them.

« Reply #13 on: December 10, 2012, 15:23 »
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What you guys are saying is, regardless of the purchase currency, if you registered an account in UK than for your checkout 1credit = 0.75GBP?

register where you have more to gain, I would go for pound if I knew this more than 3 years ago >:(

Wouldn't work. I joined the uk site ( I am in Canada), and they quickly moved my account to us site. So they can and will move your account and the way you're paid if it benefits them.

hmmm thats interesting! the opposite doesn't seem to work, how curious ;D

« Reply #14 on: December 10, 2012, 15:29 »
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I did a longish blog post on the subject a couple years ago.  A few of the numbers have changed but the concept and how things work is still the same.
http://blog.microstockgroup.com/fotolia-credits-and-commissions-whats-all-the-fuss-about/

Poncke

« Reply #15 on: December 10, 2012, 15:39 »
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I did a longish blog post on the subject a couple years ago.  A few of the numbers have changed but the concept and how things work is still the same.
http://blog.microstockgroup.com/fotolia-credits-and-commissions-whats-all-the-fuss-about/
Crap !!!!! Man I wish I could change this.

« Reply #16 on: December 10, 2012, 15:43 »
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I did a longish blog post on the subject a couple years ago.  A few of the numbers have changed but the concept and how things work is still the same.
http://blog.microstockgroup.com/fotolia-credits-and-commissions-whats-all-the-fuss-about/

curious I have joined this forum 4 days before that post and don't remember it but we have discussed this matter a few times here already, its sad they keep on doing this...

« Reply #17 on: December 10, 2012, 15:47 »
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I made the same mistake years ago. They told me to close my USD account after payout and open a new one in EUR. Which I did right after my first payout.

« Reply #18 on: December 10, 2012, 15:51 »
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its not a mistake...

« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2012, 15:58 »
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its not a mistake...

You're right. I wonder why they have all these different currency websites. You'd think they only need the USD one.

Poncke

« Reply #20 on: December 10, 2012, 16:09 »
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I made the same mistake years ago. They told me to close my USD account after payout and open a new one in EUR. Which I did right after my first payout.
Did it pay off?

« Reply #21 on: December 10, 2012, 16:10 »
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its not a mistake...

You're right. I wonder why they have all these different currency websites. You'd think they only need the USD one.

honestly I don't even understand how they can get away with this (something in their terms yes) but why can they do the opposite, turning euro accounts into $

how fair is that? why not the other way around? ain't this judge able morally? I would love to hear a lawyer's opinion in this matter

« Reply #22 on: December 11, 2012, 05:19 »
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Think of this as getting a better deal for cable TV than others. With this example you get a different rate than your neighbor. With fotolia the credit value is different for different country, you probably accept this on signup, which in my humble opinion makes this totally fine.

As for them changing your account from euro to usd, which is more profitable from them, well it all depends on the law that would apply. I can only speak of polish law which, if it could apply at all, seem to have regulation or two that may justify going to court.

My advice is, If you lost a lot this way, go to a lawyer that specializes in private international law. He will then identify the applicable law system and try to figure out if this system protects against such practice.

« Reply #23 on: December 11, 2012, 06:02 »
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I live in Europe... i am paid in Euro ( on Fotolia).... so my credits percentage from every sale is in euro.... considering that 1 euro = $1.22 that means the commission is higher than others contributors from US or US dollars dominant regions ??

Must admit,, i pay 10% tax for the images bought from US.. the US source sales are rare in my case.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2012, 06:08 by nicku »

« Reply #24 on: December 11, 2012, 06:08 »
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And this cant be changed? Feck. I wish I had known/.

there are many in the same situation, FT is pretty smart

Smart and evil/greedy isn't the same thing


 

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