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Author Topic: Fotolia Joins Adobe  (Read 20724 times)

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« on: January 28, 2015, 10:02 »
+3
Adobe Completes Acquisition of Fotolia

Vibrant Image and Video Marketplace to Be Integrated as Key Part of Adobe Creative Cloud

SAN JOSE, Calif. Jan. 28, 2015 Adobe (Nasdaq:ADBE) has completed its acquisition of privately held Fotolia, a leading marketplace for stock content. Adobe announced its intent to purchase Fotolia in December 2014 and the acquisition cements Creative Clouds role as a vibrant market for creatives to buy and sell assets and services as well as showcase their talent to a worldwide audience. Work will now begin on integrating Fotolia into Adobe Creative Cloud. This will provide current and future Creative Cloud members with the ability to access and purchase over 35 million images and videos, significantly simplifying and accelerating the design process. Adobe also plans to continue to operate Fotolia as a standalone stock service, accessible to anyone.

Founded in 2004, with offices in New York, Paris and Berlin, Fotolia currently operates in 23 countries and has websites in 14 languages.

Were now hard at work to radically simplify the buying and selling of stock content, said David Wadhwani, senior vice president, Digital Media, Adobe. Fotolia is helping Creative Cloud become the marketplace for creatives to buy and sell high-impact assets, find talent and promote their work in front of an influential global community.

With more than 3.4 million members, Adobe Creative Cloud features the worlds leading desktop tools, an array of complementary mobile apps, training content, creative assets and services and ready access to a dynamic community. Creative Cloud is transforming how creatives find inspiration and deliver their best work and the value of Creative Cloud is increasing all the time through product updates and new capabilities.

Forward-Looking Statements Disclosure

This press release includes forward-looking statements, within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, that are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors, including risks and uncertainties related to Adobes ability to successfully integrate Fotolias stock content service into Creative Cloud. All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be deemed forward-looking statements, including statements regarding: the ease of use of any future Adobe stock content service, the functionality of the services commerce system, plans for integrating the service into Creative Cloud and other anticipated benefits of the transaction to Adobe; any statements of expectation or belief; and any statements of assumptions underlying any of the foregoing. These risks, uncertainties and other factors, and the general risks associated with Adobes business, could cause actual results to differ materially from those referred to in the forward-looking statements. The reader is cautioned not to rely on these forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are based on information currently available to Adobe and are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement. For a discussion of these and other risks and uncertainties, individuals should refer to Adobe's SEC filings. Adobe does not assume any obligation to update any such forward-looking statements or other statements included in this press release.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2015, 10:16 by Nikovsk »


« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2015, 13:52 »
+1
Were now hard at work to radically simplify the buying and selling of stock content, said David Wadhwani, senior vice president, Digital Media, Adobe. Fotolia is helping Creative Cloud become the marketplace for creatives to buy and sell high-impact assets, find talent and promote their work in front of an influential global community.


This essentially says that they are getting into microstock.  I guess i am considered a creative, they call CC a marketplace to buy and sell. Maybe they say that because that loser of a company FT will continue to operate in addition to however they craft the creative cloiud access to assets.

Semmick Photo

« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2015, 14:29 »
+20
I am hoping adobe chucks out some of the aholes at FT including Chad.

« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2015, 16:20 »
0
so why does this mean ? Is fotolia becoming CreativeCloud or vice versa? i am not familiar with C C , can someone explain? when they say marketplace for creatives to buy and sell high-impact assets, find talent,
are they talking about becoming a new rival to ss?  or just another wave of vapor like ( here fill in your own subjective choice from the agencies on the right column here>>>>>)

« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2015, 16:23 »
0
3.4 million subscribers to CC? or they count anybody who has Adobe ID (I registered some Adobe products).

« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2015, 16:35 »
+2
I am hoping adobe chucks out some of the aholes at FT including Chad.

+ a lot of plusses.

« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2015, 16:46 »
+6
Fotolia under Adobe will rock... remember my words folks!  8)

ShadySue

« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2015, 18:29 »
+4
so why does this mean ? Is fotolia becoming CreativeCloud or vice versa? i am not familiar with C C , can someone explain? when they say marketplace for creatives to buy and sell high-impact assets, find talent,
are they talking about becoming a new rival to ss?  or just another wave of vapor like ( here fill in your own subjective choice from the agencies on the right column here>>>>>)

I'm guessing they'll be aiming to make it super easy to buy fotolia stock from within Adobe products.
IF they implement it well and IF they get the price point right for both sellers and buyers, it could be a game-changer, but these are two big 'ifs'.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2015, 13:18 by ShadySue »

« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2015, 20:08 »
+2
Perhaps it's the other way round - what if Fotolia customers get free access to the Adobe Cloud, either for free or for a small extra payment.  That would 'lock' customers into both products.

Time will tell.

« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2015, 20:21 »
0
If Adobe does this right, it will be a real game changer for microstock. I subscribe to Adobe CC and I have to say (I'm not a big Adobe fan) that it is pretty impressive. They could sell licenses to use stock in lots of different ways, if they sell stock images somewhat like they sell fonts with Typekit.

E.g. it might work like this: as a buyer you get an illustration from Fotolia to use on your website but it is really served from Adobe's servers (the way webfonts are). That means that if you stop your subscription to CC, the illustration disappears from your website. This could conceivably open up new kinds Rights Management. E.g. if you subscribe to Fotolia you get images to use, but only on a limited number of websites, and if you stop paying for the subscription you lose the images.

U11


« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2015, 20:35 »
+4
E.g. it might work like this: as a buyer you get an illustration from Fotolia to use on your website but it is really served from Adobe's servers (the way webfonts are). That means that if you stop your subscription to CC, the illustration disappears from your website. This could conceivably open up new kinds Rights Management. E.g. if you subscribe to Fotolia you get images to use, but only on a limited number of websites, and if you stop paying for the subscription you lose the images.
the big question what author will get.
I 've seen already 20 cents payments from Getty's "Premium Access"  deals

OM

« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2015, 20:36 »
+1
I am hoping adobe chucks out some of the aholes at FT including Chad.

Or, at least, stop him appearing on the forums as 'THE CHAD'. I think that says something about EGO.

 ;D

Uncle Pete

« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2015, 02:22 »
+7
If there's no change in the way FT operates and no way to submit directly to Adobe, or without going through FT, this will mean nothing to many people who will never again work for FT whether it's for 20c CC subs or DPC or anything else.

Here's hoping Adobe recognizes that they are not going to get the best materials from all the potential top quality suppliers. Too many bad deals and hard feelings, lingering in the wake of FTs past management.



E.g. it might work like this: as a buyer you get an illustration from Fotolia to use on your website but it is really served from Adobe's servers (the way webfonts are). That means that if you stop your subscription to CC, the illustration disappears from your website. This could conceivably open up new kinds Rights Management. E.g. if you subscribe to Fotolia you get images to use, but only on a limited number of websites, and if you stop paying for the subscription you lose the images.
the big question what author will get.
I 've seen already 20 cents payments from Getty's "Premium Access"  deals

ShadySue

« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2015, 05:05 »
0
If there's no change in the way FT operates and no way to submit directly to Adobe, or without going through FT, this will mean nothing to many people who will never again work for FT whether it's for 20c CC subs or DPC or anything else.
But it presumably won't be 'Fotolia', as such.

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2015, 08:30 »
+5
I have noticed just few minutes ago the Adobe logo on the Fotolia Homepage.

stock-will-eat-itself

« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2015, 08:49 »
+2
Hopefully they'll take their website design out of the 1980's.

« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2015, 08:50 »
+3
If there's no change in the way FT operates and no way to submit directly to Adobe, or without going through FT, this will mean nothing to many people who will never again work for FT whether it's for 20c CC subs or DPC or anything else.

Here's hoping Adobe recognizes that they are not going to get the best materials from all the potential top quality suppliers. Too many bad deals and hard feelings, lingering in the wake of FTs past management.



E.g. it might work like this: as a buyer you get an illustration from Fotolia to use on your website but it is really served from Adobe's servers (the way webfonts are). That means that if you stop your subscription to CC, the illustration disappears from your website. This could conceivably open up new kinds Rights Management. E.g. if you subscribe to Fotolia you get images to use, but only on a limited number of websites, and if you stop paying for the subscription you lose the images.
the big question what author will get.
I 've seen already 20 cents payments from Getty's "Premium Access"  deals

That's right Uncle.  I would never go back, nor be welcome, to FOTOLIA without a gutting of their currently self serving sponges that run the joint.  I can't wait for that thread to start: "Adobe cans all of FOTOLIA's staff".

I wonder if anyone has posted the DPC MSG thread in an Adobe forum or sent it to Adobe? Not that it will make any difference but who knows.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2015, 08:53 by Mantis »

Semmick Photo

« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2015, 09:14 »
+5
I will be honest about this, if management at Fotolia changes, I will try to get back in. Agree with Mantis.

« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2015, 09:36 »
+2
I will be honest about this, if management at Fotolia changes, I will try to get back in. Agree with Mantis.

I will too, Ron. I am not ashamed to admit i would go back, but i wouldnt today even if i were invited by "the chad". Mainly because these guys are all shady crooks. But if adobe replaces them with integrated management i would lobby to get back in. I would still opt out of dpc like i did.

« Reply #19 on: January 29, 2015, 09:43 »
+29
Hope they will kill DPC.

« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2015, 09:46 »
+1
I will be honest about this, if management at Fotolia changes, I will try to get back in. Agree with Mantis.

So will I.

« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2015, 10:49 »
+14
I would certainly consider it (returning to the agency) but it's not just seeing the old crew of management depart, but also the compensation models for contributors in the new Adobe CC-centered sales.

I thought the idea was interesting (somewhere above) that they might let subscribers use images as long as they were subscribers, but they'd be gone if you ever canceled. In that sort of model, would the contributor get monthly royalties on the use? If not, then it's a total ripoff, with the recurring income going to the agency for a one time payment to the contributor.

I'm not a fan of the subscription model for software licensing (although I know all the reasons why the software companies like it), but if there's going to be a sea change and contributors can go with it - with monthly income to us as well as the agencies/Adobe/whoever - then perhaps that's OK.

Having our images be part of some loss leader to flog Adobe CC subscriptions is not of much interest (DPC on steroids as it were).

Semmick Photo

« Reply #22 on: January 29, 2015, 10:52 »
0
You touch on some good points Jo Ann. I wonder about the legal implications for using our images. I assume adobe has to hold themselves to the FT T&C. Maybe they chose FT for that reason, their T&C are quite lenient and allow a lot of usage. Starting to sound like the DT/Google deal. One time payment, 100,000,000,000 times used.

objowl

« Reply #23 on: January 29, 2015, 11:48 »
0
I think that "a vibrant market for creatives to buy and sell" means a charge per use maybe like a poor mans Canva using Dollar Photo Club, but at a lower rate and RF.

« Reply #24 on: January 29, 2015, 13:16 »
+6
None of my business really as I don't use Adobe products, nor am I with Fotolia.
However I can't help thinking that this has all the making of "Exciting News" for contributors.


 

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