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Author Topic: Fotolia Joins Adobe  (Read 20399 times)

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Tryingmybest

  • Stand up for what is right
« Reply #50 on: February 05, 2015, 11:10 »
+8
THere is no conspiracy. It's a fact! Adobe is driven by the demands of big shareholders. They will destroy the company if it means they will get rich.


If you all think this merger is going to mean more sales and income, don't be disappointed if it's not. Adobe is run by greedy principals who care only for stock prices, forcing software sharecropping on sole proprietor photographers, retouchers and designers. They will ruin whoever they can and use us as rags to soak up the mess. If you thought iStock was a bad example of how to run microstock, just wait until you experience Adobe.

Good grief, what a ridiculous statement.
Adobe make good solid software they're at the top of their game for a reason. It's not like they haven't  had any competition, ask anyone who used Quark Express or who's tried to shunt repro quality docs around the Internet without PDF.
They're proven innovators, nobody knows at this stage how things will unfold. It's a bit early for conspiracy theories.


Beppe Grillo

« Reply #51 on: February 05, 2015, 12:41 »
+5


Adobe make good solid software they're at the top of their game for a reason.

Yes, they bought their main competitor and made it sink (Macromedia Freehand)

« Reply #52 on: February 05, 2015, 17:16 »
+4


Adobe make good solid software they're at the top of their game for a reason.

Yes, they bought their main competitor and made it sink (Macromedia Freehand)

Don't forget Flash, Director, Dreamweaver, Fireworks, ColdFusion ... Adobe didn't make it sink ... They acquired the company ... The two similar programs (illustrator and freehand) were combined into one as were Flash and Director. I wouldn't guess that acquiring Freehand was nearly as influential in their decision as was acquiring Flash and Director, a technology that continues to be used at every corner of the interwebs, as well as in other multimedia products.
 


« Reply #53 on: February 06, 2015, 12:08 »
+3
I agree with Striving. Adobe and Fotolia will treat contributors any way they want, to make as much money as possible. It would be naive to expect anything else.

I'm not a very big fan of Adobe. Illustrator is pretty much the same program today as in 1987. And many bugs have been around for a decade or two. And personally I now have to pay about four times (!!) as much a month for their software as I used to because of the CC system. Only people/companies who used to buy the really expensive CS packs will save money on CC.

How come exactly? Photoshop and Lightroom combined are 9.99$/month.

Photoshop CS6 extended by itself was 999$. So you can subscribe for 100 months (8.3 years) and pay the same, all the time getting fresh updates. 8 years ago the most recent version of PS was CS3.

It's similar with Illustrator. Also 9.99$/month, and CS6 was 599$ (60 months - 5 years).

Maybe you use some different combination, but for most creative professionals, CC is cheaper.

« Reply #54 on: February 06, 2015, 13:52 »
+1
I agree with Striving. Adobe and Fotolia will treat contributors any way they want, to make as much money as possible. It would be naive to expect anything else.

I'm not a very big fan of Adobe. Illustrator is pretty much the same program today as in 1987. And many bugs have been around for a decade or two. And personally I now have to pay about four times (!!) as much a month for their software as I used to because of the CC system. Only people/companies who used to buy the really expensive CS packs will save money on CC.

How come exactly? Photoshop and Lightroom combined are 9.99$/month.

Photoshop CS6 extended by itself was 999$. So you can subscribe for 100 months (8.3 years) and pay the same, all the time getting fresh updates. 8 years ago the most recent version of PS was CS3.

It's similar with Illustrator. Also 9.99$/month, and CS6 was 599$ (60 months - 5 years).

Maybe you use some different combination, but for most creative professionals, CC is cheaper.

The problem for me is that I also need ID, Flash, and while I don't need DW and could use notepad++ or something, it's a tool that I use... at $40 for those 4 I might as well have the suite just in case I decide I want or need to do something different that day. Maybe I'm in the wrong profession but, $600 a year is a little tough for a small designer in a small town ... Though, I would take the plunge (and want to) if I even knew that I'd make $50 that month. lol. Hopefully spring will start bringing some exciting projects.

Ps for $10 seems like the photographers have it made ;)

« Reply #55 on: February 06, 2015, 16:05 »
+6
Maybe you use some different combination, but for most creative professionals, CC is cheaper.

Not to revisit this painful debate, but it isn't cheaper if you're a long time owner of Photoshop, Illustrator and (less long) Lightroom. And the Photographer deal doesn't help if you do something other than just Photoshop and Lightroom, but not a lot of their products.

I have no problem with them offering the subscription to those for whom it works well. It's the removal of a regular (what they now sweetly call "perpetual") license that is deeply painful for long time users of their products.

I'm not irrational - if it were a better deal for me I'd go for it

Tryingmybest

  • Stand up for what is right
« Reply #56 on: February 06, 2015, 20:14 »
+5
Exactly! Many of us paid $400-$500 for PS and maybe some other programs 10 years ago and we were only paying $200 or less for upgrades as we needed them. That was affordable. The rentware as the ONLY option is a BIG scam that treats us like sharecroppers. There should be legislation against Adobe to bust them for monopolizing and racketeering. They will pay for their actions soon.  >:(

Maybe you use some different combination, but for most creative professionals, CC is cheaper.

Not to revisit this painful debate, but it isn't cheaper if you're a long time owner of Photoshop, Illustrator and (less long) Lightroom. And the Photographer deal doesn't help if you do something other than just Photoshop and Lightroom, but not a lot of their products.

I have no problem with them offering the subscription to those for whom it works well. It's the removal of a regular (what they now sweetly call "perpetual") license that is deeply painful for long time users of their products.

I'm not irrational - if it were a better deal for me I'd go for it

« Reply #57 on: February 07, 2015, 00:41 »
+6
My biggest hesitation right now is that it is only 9.95 (or so...)  wasn't it over $30 when they introduced it?  What happens to everyone once they renew in a year?  9.95 per month in perpetuity sounds fairly reasonable.  But then again, I paid a lot for CS5 and don't feel the need to throw any more money at Adobe until absolutely necessary.

« Reply #58 on: February 07, 2015, 04:15 »
+2
My biggest hesitation right now is that it is only 9.95 (or so...)  wasn't it over $30 when they introduced it?  What happens to everyone once they renew in a year?  9.95 per month in perpetuity sounds fairly reasonable.  But then again, I paid a lot for CS5 and don't feel the need to throw any more money at Adobe until absolutely necessary.

Currently they are saying it will stay at 9.95. Depending on inflation I am sure that will be raised sooner or later, but I doubt it will go back to 29.95. There is a reason why they lowered it.

« Reply #59 on: February 07, 2015, 15:17 »
+4
I bought a upgrade copy of CS6 when they were still available just to avoid paying monthly fees.

Forcing your users into monthly subscription can discourage innovation.   When they had to tempt us to upgrade each year, they needed to keep adding a lot of new feature to each upgrade.

« Reply #60 on: February 07, 2015, 16:43 »
+2
I agree with Striving. Adobe and Fotolia will treat contributors any way they want, to make as much money as possible. It would be naive to expect anything else.

I'm not a very big fan of Adobe. Illustrator is pretty much the same program today as in 1987. And many bugs have been around for a decade or two. And personally I now have to pay about four times (!!) as much a month for their software as I used to because of the CC system. Only people/companies who used to buy the really expensive CS packs will save money on CC.

How come exactly? Photoshop and Lightroom combined are 9.99$/month.

Photoshop CS6 extended by itself was 999$. So you can subscribe for 100 months (8.3 years) and pay the same, all the time getting fresh updates. 8 years ago the most recent version of PS was CS3.

It's similar with Illustrator. Also 9.99$/month, and CS6 was 599$ (60 months - 5 years).

Maybe you use some different combination, but for most creative professionals, CC is cheaper.

Yes, I suppose I am one of the most unfortunate ones when it comes to this new payment model. I used to get CS Design Standard updates every two year for about 700 USD, which is 29 USD a month for Illustrator, Indesign, Photoshop and Acrobat. Today I have to pay 52 USD for CC (which of course gives me access to more apps, but I don't use them anyway so it's a waste of money) for the first two years and after that about 72 USD a month.

I could also pick just Photoshop and Illustrator which are the only apps I use daily but it would still be 43 USD a month.

I live in Europe by the way and for some insane reason Adobe products are a lot more expensive here.


Rinderart

« Reply #61 on: February 08, 2015, 14:04 »
+3
Fotolia under Adobe will rock... remember my words folks!  8)

I agree also. Fingers crossed.

« Reply #62 on: February 08, 2015, 14:32 »
+3
Fotolia under Adobe will rock... remember my words folks!  8)

I agree also. Fingers crossed.

This is pure wishful thinking. When we say "better" I am sure we all mean similar things....fairer search, better commissions, getting rid of ranking, etc. At least from the perspective of commissions, it won't change unless Adobe comes up with special licenses like SS has. Other than that it's fantasy to assume they will raise commissions and change the foundation of that sh!tty agency.

« Reply #63 on: March 09, 2015, 10:03 »
+4
Adobe is already changing image prices, setting them higher at least for the lower ranks.

One L sale was 7, now 8. A bronze X sale went from 50 to 60 and so on. Nice move!

Dook

« Reply #64 on: March 09, 2015, 11:15 »
+1
Yes, and the minimum price that you can set for EL is now 30 credits. It used to be 20. And it was default price, if you don't change it manually, it would stay that way. Nice move, too.

« Reply #65 on: March 09, 2015, 11:29 »
+1
Adobe is already changing image prices, setting them higher at least for the lower ranks.

One L sale was 7, now 8. A bronze X sale went from 50 to 60 and so on. Nice move!

Did they announce this increase anywhere or did they just slide it in like the would have in the past?

« Reply #66 on: March 09, 2015, 14:35 »
+2
Will contributors get free Creative Cloud subscription is what I want to know!  8)

« Reply #67 on: March 09, 2015, 15:21 »
0
In Israel we pay 15$ for all of CC software and 9$ for photoshop and Lightroom.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Uncle Pete

« Reply #68 on: March 09, 2015, 23:38 »
0
Interesting. Still says 20 on the FT site?

http://us.fotolia.com/Info/Credits




Yes, and the minimum price that you can set for EL is now 30 credits. It used to be 20. And it was default price, if you don't change it manually, it would stay that way. Nice move, too.

Dook

« Reply #69 on: March 10, 2015, 05:11 »
+1
Uncle Pete, yes, I see this now, too. I noticed the change to 30 while I was uploading yesterday. I think you can still set it to 20, but the default price during uploading process is 30 now.

« Reply #70 on: March 10, 2015, 08:41 »
0
they have changed all my vector extended prices from 80 credits to 30 (not 60 even it is new maximum price)

haven't sold any extended licences but very unhappy with this move.


« Reply #71 on: March 10, 2015, 08:44 »
0
A bronze X sale went from 50 to 60 and so on. Nice move!

For photos went up from 50 to 60, but from vector down from 80 to 60, and looks like if someone had maximum of 80 credits, like me, fotolia put new 30 credits price to all vectors(bronze)

so everyone check it out in your portfolio

 >:(

« Reply #72 on: March 10, 2015, 09:51 »
0
A bronze X sale went from 50 to 60 and so on. Nice move!

For photos went up from 50 to 60, but from vector down from 80 to 60, and looks like if someone had maximum of 80 credits, like me, fotolia put new 30 credits price to all vectors(bronze)

so everyone check it out in your portfolio

 >:(


I'm not seeing that. All of my vectors are still priced at 100 credits for Extended XV.

« Reply #73 on: March 10, 2015, 10:01 »
0


I'm not seeing that. All of my vectors are still priced at 100 credits for Extended XV.

are you bronze level?

« Reply #74 on: March 10, 2015, 10:22 »
+2
Anyone else notice review times have really slowed down recently?


 

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