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« Reply #200 on: January 21, 2019, 11:05 »
0
On the new adobe upload page, you are asked about 'recognisable property'. If you say 'yes', you are prompted to choose or upload a release, so what are you supposed to do with recognisable property that doesn't require a release?

It doesn't feel right to say 'no' to the question when there clearly is some recognisable property in the image.

I have been sticking with the FT upload portal for exactly this reason - wasn't sure what to do about public buildings or other property that doesn't require a release.  There has not been a change in the review criteria when uploaded through FT so I assume we are to interpret "recognizable" as "recognizable that requires a release" unless they tell us otherwise.

Yes, this is correct. Only click yes if the recognizable property requires a release.

-Mat

So if we have a private house in the distance, but we took the image from a public position, we can simply click no to recognisable property?


« Reply #201 on: January 22, 2019, 15:51 »
+1
On the new adobe upload page, you are asked about 'recognisable property'. If you say 'yes', you are prompted to choose or upload a release, so what are you supposed to do with recognisable property that doesn't require a release?

It doesn't feel right to say 'no' to the question when there clearly is some recognisable property in the image.

I have been sticking with the FT upload portal for exactly this reason - wasn't sure what to do about public buildings or other property that doesn't require a release.  There has not been a change in the review criteria when uploaded through FT so I assume we are to interpret "recognizable" as "recognizable that requires a release" unless they tell us otherwise.

Yes, this is correct. Only click yes if the recognizable property requires a release.

-Mat

So if we have a private house in the distance, but we took the image from a public position, we can simply click no to recognisable property?

The location you took an image from is irrelevant. The content of the image is what counts when determining if you need a release. For details on our legal guidelines including property release requirements please visit our learn and support pages linked here: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/user-guide.html?topic=/stock/contributor/morehelp/legal-guidelines.ug.js

Kind regards,

Mat Hayward

« Reply #202 on: January 22, 2019, 18:09 »
+1
On the new adobe upload page, you are asked about 'recognisable property'. If you say 'yes', you are prompted to choose or upload a release, so what are you supposed to do with recognisable property that doesn't require a release?

It doesn't feel right to say 'no' to the question when there clearly is some recognisable property in the image.

I have been sticking with the FT upload portal for exactly this reason - wasn't sure what to do about public buildings or other property that doesn't require a release.  There has not been a change in the review criteria when uploaded through FT so I assume we are to interpret "recognizable" as "recognizable that requires a release" unless they tell us otherwise.

Yes, this is correct. Only click yes if the recognizable property requires a release.

-Mat

So if we have a private house in the distance, but we took the image from a public position, we can simply click no to recognisable property?

The location you took an image from is irrelevant. The content of the image is what counts when determining if you need a release. For details on our legal guidelines including property release requirements please visit our learn and support pages linked here: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/user-guide.html?topic=/stock/contributor/morehelp/legal-guidelines.ug.js

Kind regards,

Mat Hayward

I'm not sure I get where I took an image from as being irrelevant, as if I was on private land rather than public, I would surely need a release?

Anyway, thanks for the article link, it was interesting and has confused me even further, as I now have to decide whether a house is generic or not :-\

I will just leave it to the inspectors to bounce it back if they want a release.

« Reply #203 on: January 23, 2019, 04:48 »
0
On the new adobe upload page, you are asked about 'recognisable property'. If you say 'yes', you are prompted to choose or upload a release, so what are you supposed to do with recognisable property that doesn't require a release?

It doesn't feel right to say 'no' to the question when there clearly is some recognisable property in the image.


I have been sticking with the FT upload portal for exactly this reason - wasn't sure what to do about public buildings or other property that doesn't require a release.  There has not been a change in the review criteria when uploaded through FT so I assume we are to interpret "recognizable" as "recognizable that requires a release" unless they tell us otherwise.


Yes, this is correct. Only click yes if the recognizable property requires a release.

-Mat


So if we have a private house in the distance, but we took the image from a public position, we can simply click no to recognisable property?


The location you took an image from is irrelevant. The content of the image is what counts when determining if you need a release. For details on our legal guidelines including property release requirements please visit our learn and support pages linked here: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/user-guide.html?topic=/stock/contributor/morehelp/legal-guidelines.ug.js

Kind regards,

Mat Hayward


I'm not sure I get where I took an image from as being irrelevant, as if I was on private land rather than public, I would surely need a release?

Anyway, thanks for the article link, it was interesting and has confused me even further, as I now have to decide whether a house is generic or not :-\

I will just leave it to the inspectors to bounce it back if they want a release.


Location is sometimes relevant if you're on a private property or privately owned land, and take photos of subjects that can be linked back to this place, then you might need a property release from the owner.

But what appears on your photo is also affecting this - as Mat said. For instance, buildings can be copyrighted by the artist / architect / owner although their photo can be taken from public space. If they are, usually they can't be the main subject of an image but some copyrighted buildings are acceptable in skylines or cityscapes as long as they are with other buildings. It's really a case by case thing.

"So if we have a private house in the distance, but we took the image from a public position, we can simply click no to recognisable property?"
I'd say go for it if it's a home as the owner is unlikely to create trouble. If it's a known building design such as a modern house or a business, maybe double check online with its name.

There's also a few resources that work great together when you're not sure - you can search by location or building name with CMD+F or CTRL+F function:

AS
- https://helpx.adobe.com/uk/stock/contributor/help/known-image-restrictions.html

IS
- http://wiki.gettyimages.com/category/architecture/

SS
- https://www.shutterstock.com/contributorsupport/articles/kbat02/Known-Image-Restrictions-Objects-and-Subjects

« Reply #204 on: January 23, 2019, 18:56 »
0
On the new adobe upload page, you are asked about 'recognisable property'. If you say 'yes', you are prompted to choose or upload a release, so what are you supposed to do with recognisable property that doesn't require a release?

It doesn't feel right to say 'no' to the question when there clearly is some recognisable property in the image.


I have been sticking with the FT upload portal for exactly this reason - wasn't sure what to do about public buildings or other property that doesn't require a release.  There has not been a change in the review criteria when uploaded through FT so I assume we are to interpret "recognizable" as "recognizable that requires a release" unless they tell us otherwise.


Yes, this is correct. Only click yes if the recognizable property requires a release.

-Mat


So if we have a private house in the distance, but we took the image from a public position, we can simply click no to recognisable property?


The location you took an image from is irrelevant. The content of the image is what counts when determining if you need a release. For details on our legal guidelines including property release requirements please visit our learn and support pages linked here: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/user-guide.html?topic=/stock/contributor/morehelp/legal-guidelines.ug.js

Kind regards,

Mat Hayward


I'm not sure I get where I took an image from as being irrelevant, as if I was on private land rather than public, I would surely need a release?

Anyway, thanks for the article link, it was interesting and has confused me even further, as I now have to decide whether a house is generic or not :-\

I will just leave it to the inspectors to bounce it back if they want a release.


Location is sometimes relevant if you're on a private property or privately owned land, and take photos of subjects that can be linked back to this place, then you might need a property release from the owner.

But what appears on your photo is also affecting this - as Mat said. For instance, buildings can be copyrighted by the artist / architect / owner although their photo can be taken from public space. If they are, usually they can't be the main subject of an image but some copyrighted buildings are acceptable in skylines or cityscapes as long as they are with other buildings. It's really a case by case thing.

"So if we have a private house in the distance, but we took the image from a public position, we can simply click no to recognisable property?"
I'd say go for it if it's a home as the owner is unlikely to create trouble. If it's a known building design such as a modern house or a business, maybe double check online with its name.

There's also a few resources that work great together when you're not sure - you can search by location or building name with CMD+F or CTRL+F function:

AS
- https://helpx.adobe.com/uk/stock/contributor/help/known-image-restrictions.html

IS
- http://wiki.gettyimages.com/category/architecture/

SS
- https://www.shutterstock.com/contributorsupport/articles/kbat02/Known-Image-Restrictions-Objects-and-Subjects


Thanks for the links!

Interestingly, the Adobe one says 'Photos of the building exterior may be acceptable if taken from public property. Photos taken on private property, including the interior, are restricted'.

The image is a generic house in a landscape taken from a public place. Shutterstock and Istock have both approved it on this basis, but Adobe had requested a release.

I'm going round in circles with this one, so I guess I'll pass where Adobe is concerned.


 

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