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Author Topic: Introducing the free collection from Adobe Stock  (Read 12887 times)

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« Reply #300 on: November 06, 2020, 10:21 »
+1
- Connected to the above, the free section has content from Wavebreak media (~14,200 images in WavebreakMediaMicro and wavebreak3), Rawpixel.com (over 10,000), Wirestock (~5,300), Gstudio (~4,000), Jeremy Bishop (~4,000), Good Studio (~3,000), Artinspiring (~4,000), Caia Image (~4,000), Jacob Lund (~7,000), Visual Generation (~4,000) Hero Images (~7,000), Morgan (111). This is all high quality content, largely indistinguishable from the paid content.

I'm interested that are those very known microstock contributors paid to be included in the free collection? Or do they get even paid something for free downloads? As in general I think it would be very hard to get that much content from them to be offered for free and make a promise for possible better sales in somewhere future.

I understand the free concept very well. It has over two years that we made a customer survey which resulted that in Finland over 23% of the customers used primarily free image banks, over 57% used sometimes and only 20% said that they are not using free image banks. So in that light Stock agencies are in a real pressure for offering something free to get more visitors to their pages.


« Reply #301 on: November 06, 2020, 10:34 »
+2
OK, Juha, but please read all the thread. Yes agencies think about their interests, we think about us, to not loose the crumbs the agencies have left for us.

« Reply #302 on: November 06, 2020, 12:49 »
0
- Connected to the above, the free section has content from Wavebreak media (~14,200 images in WavebreakMediaMicro and wavebreak3), Rawpixel.com (over 10,000), Wirestock (~5,300), Gstudio (~4,000), Jeremy Bishop (~4,000), Good Studio (~3,000), Artinspiring (~4,000), Caia Image (~4,000), Jacob Lund (~7,000), Visual Generation (~4,000) Hero Images (~7,000), Morgan (111). This is all high quality content, largely indistinguishable from the paid content.

I'm interested that are those very known microstock contributors paid to be included in the free collection? Or do they get even paid something for free downloads? As in general I think it would be very hard to get that much content from them to be offered for free and make a promise for possible better sales in somewhere future.

I understand the free concept very well. It has over two years that we made a customer survey which resulted that in Finland over 23% of the customers used primarily free image banks, over 57% used sometimes and only 20% said that they are not using free image banks. So in that light Stock agencies are in a real pressure for offering something free to get more visitors to their pages.

Yes, all contributors with content in the Free collection have been paid for their participation.

-Mat

« Reply #303 on: November 06, 2020, 17:39 »
+1
The free collection seems to be small. That's fine to me if it doesnt grow too much. Now please can you add a social media share button on images ?  ::)

« Reply #304 on: November 06, 2020, 19:48 »
0
The free collection seems to be small. That's fine to me if it doesnt grow too much. Now please can you add a social media share button on images ?  ::)

Thanks for the feedback. Your suggestion has been duly noted.

-Mat
« Last Edit: November 06, 2020, 19:50 by MatHayward »

« Reply #305 on: November 07, 2020, 00:22 »
0

Yes, all contributors with content in the Free collection have been paid for their participation.

-Mat

How much?

« Reply #306 on: November 07, 2020, 03:19 »
+3
Mat, the best solution would be that Adobe should buy the rights to images in Free collection. This way, you would be distributing your own images and marketing your software with your own content.

-- edited due to typos --
« Last Edit: November 07, 2020, 03:22 by ravens »

« Reply #307 on: November 07, 2020, 20:38 »
0
Mat, the best solution would be that Adobe should buy the rights to images in Free collection. This way, you would be distributing your own images and marketing your software with your own content.

-- edited due to typos --

if the 1 yr cost is $X / image what would a buyout cost?   it would also make it more costly to change the collection each year

« Reply #308 on: November 07, 2020, 21:15 »
+2
A problem would be if a popular image is added to adobe free then, OK Adobe pays for is use.  *BUT* given that image is now free to anyone, the chances are it'll never sell again on *any* agency so you lose all the income from it from everywhere.

« Reply #309 on: November 08, 2020, 06:32 »
0
Mat, the best solution would be that Adobe should buy the rights to images in Free collection. This way, you would be distributing your own images and marketing your software with your own content.

-- edited due to typos --

if the 1 yr cost is $X / image what would a buyout cost?   it would also make it more costly to change the collection each year

This is something Mat should answer. Buyout is the only way to eliminate negative contributor related consequences, ones like gnirtS below describes.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #310 on: November 08, 2020, 09:12 »
+6
This is something Mat should answer. Buyout is the only way to eliminate negative contributor related consequences, ones like gnirtS below describes.
Nothing can eliminate negative contributor related consequences related to a free collection. It more and more reinforces user beliefs that content is (or at least 'should be') free. Why would many users pay if they can get a file which 'satisfices' for free? Of course some won't be content to satisfice, but I'm sure many will.
For the providers of the free files, yes, it's better they got paid than they got nothing; but there is little positive in this scheme for suppliers.

« Reply #311 on: November 08, 2020, 09:22 »
+3
Something else to consider is Shutterstock do similar - a free trial.

But reading TrustPilot and the buyer/stock creator Facebook groups and forums its very clear a very large percentage of new "customers" sign up for this trial with absolutely no intention of paying or becoming regular contributors.  They openly admit they'll take whats needed with the trial and wont need to sign up with ongoing payment.

AS have to be very careful this is happening - if free images ARE available they need to be small in number and arguably, the ones less popular to at least provide an incentive to sign up.  Giving away your best stuff for free is never going to encourage regular customers.

« Reply #312 on: November 08, 2020, 09:56 »
0
Something else to consider is Shutterstock do similar - a free trial.

Adobe has a free trial too.





Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #313 on: November 08, 2020, 11:19 »
+1
Something else to consider is Shutterstock do similar - a free trial.

Adobe has a free trial too.


Yes they do. And Getty too:  Browse 6,491 free trial stock photos and images available...

Dreamstime free trial 15 images.

Netflix, Hulu, NBC, and pretty much every streaming TV channel have free trials. This isn't that unusual. Free trial memberships are common and a way to attract new members to a payment system.

Don't even start with Amazon Prime, free trial, that starts a subscription with, bait links and how that one traps people, over and over.  >:(

« Reply #314 on: November 08, 2020, 12:18 »
+2




Don't even start with Amazon Prime, free trial, that starts a subscription with, bait links and how that one traps people, over and over.  >:(

Huh? Adobe Amazon Prime is the most user-friendly easy-to-unsubscripe free trial I have ever come across. You just have to check a checkbox  and it will not be automatically prolonged. At least that's how it was 2 or 3 years ago.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2020, 14:14 by Firn »

« Reply #315 on: November 08, 2020, 13:17 »
+1




Don't even start with Amazon Prime, free trial, that starts a subscription with, bait links and how that one traps people, over and over.  >:(

Huh? Adobe Prime is the most user-friendly easy-to-unsubscripe free trial I have ever come across. You just have to check a checkbox  and it will not be automatically prolonged. At least that's how it was 2 or 3 years ago.

Yes, Ive found that part to be true, too. But I am a little disgusted with them...I have started watching a couple of shows, get thru one season, Im hooked, then find out in order to watch more, you have to pay! I know why. Because they are, say, Showtime programs. So Prime gives you a preview, but they dont make it clear upfront. Who knew you had to check thru episodes and seasons to see if thats going to happen. I know now.

If I wanted to watch programs from Showtime, Id subscribe. I pay for a Prime subscription. When I login to Prime, I expect all the programs to be available for free under my subscription.

Sounds like one or more of the stock sites are employing the same kind of marketing. Im thinking of SS, where I read some say that after the free trial, they bill you even after you cancel.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2020, 13:22 by cathyslife »

« Reply #316 on: November 09, 2020, 02:54 »
+2




Don't even start with Amazon Prime, free trial, that starts a subscription with, bait links and how that one traps people, over and over.  >:(

Huh? Adobe Prime is the most user-friendly easy-to-unsubscripe free trial I have ever come across. You just have to check a checkbox  and it will not be automatically prolonged. At least that's how it was 2 or 3 years ago.

Yes, Ive found that part to be true, too. But I am a little disgusted with them...I have started watching a couple of shows, get thru one season, Im hooked, then find out in order to watch more, you have to pay! I know why. Because they are, say, Showtime programs. So Prime gives you a preview, but they dont make it clear upfront. Who knew you had to check thru episodes and seasons to see if thats going to happen. I know now.

If I wanted to watch programs from Showtime, Id subscribe. I pay for a Prime subscription. When I login to Prime, I expect all the programs to be available for free under my subscription.

Sounds like one or more of the stock sites are employing the same kind of marketing. Im thinking of SS, where I read some say that after the free trial, they bill you even after you cancel.

Usually you just have to wait a bit longer - if they have one season of a series in their free prime collection, the newer ones will be added to the free collection at some point too, but it can take a while. I can live with that. I am just not very thrilled with how few shows are added to the free collection each month. The selection isn't that great. When I got prime it was super cheap (something like only 30 each year?), so it was worth it, because even though you did not get all that much for it, it wasn't much money and there is also a small selection of free music and the free shipping (though, from my experience items that have free shipping for prime members usually cost a few more than on other sites, so they just add the shipping costs to the item price....). But I think they have trippled the price by now, not sure I am going to keep it for another year, especially since their service has gone downhill.
But I think this is getting a bit off topic....

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #317 on: November 10, 2020, 07:13 »
+1




Don't even start with Amazon Prime, free trial, that starts a subscription with, bait links and how that one traps people, over and over.  >:(

Huh? Adobe Prime is the most user-friendly easy-to-unsubscripe free trial I have ever come across. You just have to check a checkbox  and it will not be automatically prolonged. At least that's how it was 2 or 3 years ago.

Adobe Prime? If you mean Amazon Prime, the problem is, they put all kinds of bait ads and popups, that mask the fact that by getting a free trial, or free shipping on this order, you just signed up for a years account. And my experience hasn't been as simple as click and it's gone. I had to contact Amazon, when the bill came through on my credit card and explain, I didn't want Prime. Valerie also had the same.

Anyway, the point is, SS is no different than all kinds of other businesses that offer a free trial month, when someone takes out a years subscription. Streaming services, Netflix and I could write a whole long list, because pretty much all of them, do that. The problem is, none that I know of, write and say "hey your free month is going to end and we're going to enforce a years contract starting in seven days" that's why people get upset and complain, because the responsibility for remembering and cancelling is on the person who signed up for the free month, that comes with the years subscription.

It's a standard practice.

And now in an attempt to drag this back towards the topic:

"Try the entire collection of 20+ creative desktop and mobile apps including Photoshop, Illustrator, and Adobe XD free for 7 days, or buy it now for just US$52.99/mo."

Adobe is trying to bring in new customers, who may not come to the site, without the offer of free downloads. And when they go look at the free images, they are likely to see this:

10 standard assets a month

    First month free, then US$29.99/month
    Cancel risk-free within the first month
    Rollover up to 120 standard assets with renewal


Same as all the streaming, ShutterStock, Amazon, and probably everywhere else. Cancel risk-free within the first month

More buyers, means more money for us.

« Reply #318 on: November 10, 2020, 07:44 »
+1

Usually you just have to wait a bit longer - if they have one season of a series in their free prime collection, the newer ones will be added to the free collection at some point too, but it can take a while. I can live with that.

Yes, I figured that might be the case. I can wait too. Theres more than enough programs to watch, between netflix, hulu, and prime. Im still hooked into 21 seasons of Silent Witness from the BBC.

As far as the Adobe free topic, I dont believe converting free customers into actual buyers works. But good luck to Adobe. Im with Shelma1, Id love free Adobe software, no strings attached like the free images are.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2020, 07:48 by cathyslife »

« Reply #319 on: November 10, 2020, 14:20 »
+2

 If you mean Amazon Prime, the problem is, they put all kinds of bait ads and popups, that mask the fact that by getting a free trial, or free shipping on this order, you just signed up for a years account. And my experience hasn't been as simple as click and it's gone. I had to contact Amazon, when the bill came through on my credit card and explain, I didn't want Prime. Valerie also had the same.


Maybe it's different where you live and only the German version is (or was) so trial-friendly then? Because I used that trial and after I signed up I could go to my account settings right away and just uncheck a "extend prime membership" (don't remember the exact wording) checkbox and that was it. Not a single cent was taken from my account. I was actually impressed with how easy it was, because with every other free trial I have ever seen, it was always made very difficult to get out of it, but this was really as simple as it could get. I don't know how it is now, maybe it was changed.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2020, 02:09 by Firn »

« Reply #320 on: November 10, 2020, 16:12 »
0

 If you mean Amazon Prime, the problem is, they put all kinds of bait ads and popups, that mask the fact that by getting a free trial, or free shipping on this order, you just signed up for a years account. And my experience hasn't been as simple as click and it's gone. I had to contact Amazon, when the bill came through on my credit card and explain, I didn't want Prime. Valerie also had the same.


Maybe it's different where you live and only the German version is (or was) so trial-friendly then? Because I used that trial and after I signed up I could go to my account settings right away and just uncheck a "extend prime membership" (don't remember the exact woding) button and that was it. Not a single cent was taken from my account. I was actually impressed with how easy it was, because with every other free trial I hav ever seen, it was always made very difficult to get out of it, but this was really as simple as it could get. I don't know how it is now, maybe it was changed.

I had the same experience as you. I signed up a few years back, had it awhile, then cancelled. When I decided to subscribe again, I did so because it was so easy the first time around. I also had Hulu, and Id never subscribe to them again. I paid more money per month to get rid of ads, but there were still ads. I promptly unsubscribed.

« Reply #321 on: November 11, 2020, 09:31 »
0


 
 it wasnt free, you had to upload 300 new images and have them approved, adobe made money on the back of that, and creating 300 images is a hell of a lot of work

you seem to have trouble with the meaning of simple words like 'free' and 'limit' etc
first, please stop the ad hominem attacks on Matt you made earlier

you seem to have trouble with simple words too!! - there was NO CHARGE for the  bonus -- there was an incentive for uploads and a reward was given.  commonly done for all sorts of transactions -'buy 2 get one free', 'earn 1000 pts for a reward',etc
you have a problem with reading, i never said there was a charge, I said the bonus wasnt free, which it wasnt

admin edit: removed offensive language
« Last Edit: November 11, 2020, 12:02 by leaf »


 

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