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Author Topic: No sales 700+ photo  (Read 3250 times)

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« on: July 02, 2019, 17:34 »
0
Thank you in advance for your answers.  About three months.  Uploading Adobe stock photos.  I have 700-800 photos.  But not even one sale.  Where does the problem come from?


My portfolio:

https://stock.adobe.com/contributor/208559319/Caner%20%C3%87%C4%B0FT%C3%87%C4%B0 [nofollow]

E6633 cihazımdan Tapatalk kullanılarak gnderildi



gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2019, 19:23 »
+7
I think you are on the right track, you just need to start shooting unique topics. flowers and fruits are a waste of time, you must have hundreds of those. Don't worry, we all started out doing that too. :) I literally have the same files in my portfolio from the early days: lollies, nuts, flowers, etc, they rarely sell cos you need to be in the top line of the search and those areas are oversaturated. Also when I first started out my editing was a bit poor so even if the shot was good the editing isn't. A lot of of your studio stuff seems to be back lit or side lit, needs a touch of light in the foreground to really pop and be a clean isolated image. when you shoot fruit in studio be sure to remove spots etc. random cats won't sell. You have many similars, you have 100 photos of shampoo bottles?  How many actual "shoots" do you think you have? Other general things like white balance, crooked horizon, dull landscapes, poor lighting...  I'm not seeing anything that stands out. I saw a nice tulip shot, but i'll bet there are 10K plus photos of tulips on Adobe, that are nicer than yours. I'm sure wherever you live you can find something unique and shoot it in a beautiful way. and no, that doesn't mean you go and shoot coffee in your local cafe, also been done to death, find something new to shoot. good luck.

« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2019, 20:16 »
+9

Where does the problem come from?


Everything is fine beside that you are more or less 15 years late.

« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2019, 20:52 »
+5
Your results appear to be normal.  Welcome to stock photography 2019. 

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2019, 05:43 »
0
Sometimes you have some weird titles:

"it's called ring dessert. It was taken while frying in oil"
https://stock.adobe.com/images/it-s-called-ring-dessert-it-was-taken-while-frying-in-oil/275290334?prev_url=detail

"cat, different movements, cheerful, animals, friendly, happy, stray cat,"
https://stock.adobe.com/images/cat-different-movements-cheerful-animals-friendly-happy-stray-cat/265267550?prev_url=detail

I'm no expert in photography, but I agree with the others that nothing really stands out in your portfolio.

« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2019, 05:55 »
+2
2019 200 million still agency accept this kind of portfolio? For me is unbielevable. No offence but whats the poi t for you and for them to accept content who clearly due to technical skill and content dont have any chanche to be sold? 700 file needs lot pf time compares to the probability of esrning any money.
The problem is that most if not all new photographer and content added atmre of this level.
Photography is light, composition . Subject. Your portfolio sinply lack in any aspect. Tge shanpoo bottke even 4 years ago wouldnt have a chanche to be accepted due to poor lighting. These agency have killed this business and soon this will be reflectes in the lack ofgood contents cause novodyba bit professional
Will lose time producibg content.

ShadySue

« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2019, 05:56 »
+2
Sometimes you have some weird titles:
"it's called ring dessert. It was taken while frying in oil"
https://stock.adobe.com/images/it-s-called-ring-dessert-it-was-taken-while-frying-in-oil/275290334?prev_url=detail
@OP Is it churros, or something closely related?

Like I said in the other thread, your tabletop pics look like composition or lighting/exposure exercises, nothing like stock photos.

« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2019, 06:13 »
0
You're right about what you said.  Since I started from scratch, studio shots are not perfect.  But what confuses me is the sale of SS.  I don't understand this part.  Turkish proverb: Every bad commodity has a buyer.

E6633 cihazımdan Tapatalk kullanılarak gnderildi


« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2019, 06:38 »
+1
You're right about what you said.  Since I started from scratch, studio shots are not perfect.  But what confuses me is the sale of SS.  I don't understand this part.  Turkish proverb: Every bad commodity has a buyer.

E6633 cihazımdan Tapatalk kullanılarak gnderildi


Ss you have some sales cause ss is biased towards content for which they pay 25 cents.
Once rhe different royalty were a mean to reach greeat quality level of content, pushing good content and for ing contriboutor to create better content and reaching a lower royalty level. Today is the way they simply make ends meet . Since they are a quited company and need to show always good ewrning they simply push lower royalty level content sonthey save 13 cent for each sale taht multiplied fpr million inages makes them oftej satisfy the market. Thats why you see not sales in adobe but in ss. Adobe dont needs to push lower royalty inages. Thats why ss is practicalky accepting everything without any control on ehat is uploaded. Personally at this poi t i would accept a lower royalty the same for everybody. I am sure most of those sbapshot uploaded in the last years will never sells a single time.

ShadySue

« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2019, 06:39 »
+3
You're right about what you said.  Since I started from scratch, studio shots are not perfect.  But what confuses me is the sale of SS.  I don't understand this part.  Turkish proverb: Every bad commodity has a buyer.

E6633 cihazımdan Tapatalk kullanılarak gnderildi

It may be that Turkey isn't a great source of stock sales. And even that saying wouldn't apply if there were better goods on offer at the exact same price.

Also, even if these were beginner exercises, one of the purposes of these is for you then to learn which photo from a set is best. Even if these were useful stock (which mostly they're not), you need to learn to edit and cull.

« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2019, 07:20 »
+4
I think you are on the right track...


Not even close.


« Reply #12 on: July 03, 2019, 08:08 »
+2
I think lots of them have good potential.

However descriptions are terrible overall, and you're getting penalised in rankings because of non relevant words in both description and keywords...

« Reply #13 on: July 03, 2019, 08:19 »
+2
Animals dont sell
Flowers dont sell

Many images looks the same
Some images are too dark

But i am not an expert, some of my own images are terrible too :)

On Youtube are many Stock videos, good for learning and for inspiration.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2019, 08:23 by whosvegas »

« Reply #14 on: July 03, 2019, 09:09 »
+1
I think you are on the right track...


Not even close.

She was trying to offer encouragement.

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2019, 09:49 »
+3
Lost in the translation:

Bitli baklanın kr alıcısı olur.
        Literal translation: Wormy beans will have blind buyers.
        Meanning: Even worthless things find a buyer.

We'd need some blind photo buyers?  ;)

I just wanted to reply to the OP and thousands of others who come and ask and will come and ask. It's not how many photos you have, it is all about What are they? Someone with 20 great photos will make much more than someone with 2,000 average, common and meaningless photos.

Think of what you are uploading in terms of, why would someone want to pay for this. And try not to stretch your imagination too much with, "well someone might want a photo of dog do on a sandy beach. Yeah they might, but how many people want that.

For Microstock, in general, especially when starting out: Shoot well lighted, bright, colorful, subjects that buyers need and want. Find subjects that might be used to illustrate an article, make a point or demonstrate examples of the subject.

Good Luck

Assorted arrangements of assorted blank bottles, could be a background. You take the best shot, and move on, not make 50 versions, just in case. You have one image maybe two of use, then it's covered.  :)

« Reply #16 on: July 03, 2019, 09:53 »
+2
I think you are on the right track...


Not even close.

She was trying to offer encouragement.

Martha... I completely understand that. Sometimes the truth needs to be said even if it is a bitter pill to swallow. There is a clear reason why none of their 700+ images sell.

« Last Edit: July 03, 2019, 09:56 by Clair Voyant »

ShadySue

« Reply #17 on: July 03, 2019, 10:25 »
+1
Animals dont sell
Flowers dont sell
They do sell, but the competition is intense.

« Reply #18 on: July 03, 2019, 11:49 »
+1
I think you are on the right track...


Not even close.

She was trying to offer encouragement.

Martha... I completely understand that. Sometimes the truth needs to be said even if it is a bitter pill to swallow. There is a clear reason why none of their 700+ images sell.

Yep, I get it.

« Reply #19 on: July 03, 2019, 13:26 »
+4
Just had glance through your portfolio. Given that you have zero sales, it appears you are shooting photos of subjects that no body wants. If this was 2005, I'd be very confident that you get a bunch of sales every single day. But it is 2019 now. The competition is fierce. There are tens of thousands of photographers who are many times much better than you who also sell stock. If you photos don't look like the same quality of images that you see in any magazine, then most likely you are not good enough for stock photos in 2019.

The tricky part is that when I first started out, I also shot photos just like yours. I was just lucky enough to start out when there weren't much competition, and I had very long time to get a little better each year to keep up with competition. You on the hard hand don't have that luxury. You probably need to go on youtube and watch a lot of videos on how to shoot and edit for stock photos, otherwise your skills gap probably suggests you are wasting your time. My uninformed guess by looking at your current photos is that you probably need to spend hundreds of hours learning how to edit photos to a quality that is magazine worthy. Stock photos is much more than just pressing a camera button.

And if you read some of the other threads on this website, you can see that even some of the pros are having a hard time earning decent money these days.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2019, 13:37 by charged »

« Reply #20 on: July 03, 2019, 15:50 »
+2
Many of your photos... a lot of people can take them with their phones in 2019. And the photos that does have some commercial value, I've seen other photos with similar subject matter that are a lot more downloadable.

« Reply #21 on: July 03, 2019, 16:51 »
0
...hmm i think these are Head and Shoulders shampoo bottles?

« Reply #22 on: July 04, 2019, 01:12 »
0
Animals dont sell
Flowers dont sell
They do sell, but the competition is intense.
Correction, the animals and flowers in my port don't sell :)

« Reply #23 on: July 04, 2019, 10:11 »
+1
Animals dont sell
Flowers dont sell
They do sell, but the competition is intense.
Correction, the animals and flowers in my port don't sell :)

😂

gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #24 on: July 26, 2019, 21:11 »
0
I think you are on the right track...


Not even close.

She was trying to offer encouragement.

Martha... I completely understand that. Sometimes the truth needs to be said even if it is a bitter pill to swallow. There is a clear reason why none of their 700+ images sell.
haha, what's funny is that usually it's me being brutally honest. I was indeed trying to be encouraging, cos I remember what it like to be a newbie. We all started out shooting the easy, dumb stuff, it's part of the process.


 

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