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Author Topic: EU VAT Changes from January 2015! ALERT  (Read 38308 times)

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« Reply #50 on: December 21, 2014, 11:24 »
+1
I know a payment processor that handles Vat and sales taxes on behalf of sellers of digital goods...

I don't know how it could be integrated to sell photos... But is worth checking out.

 There is a company named Fastspring, based in California, and they are more popular with software publishers. Just google them.  They handle vat, and sales taxes on behalf of sellers of digital goods and is something they have been doing for a long time.
They say they are  registered with the EU.

Just throwing ideas out there....



Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #51 on: December 21, 2014, 11:36 »
+2
international stock photographer/illustrator union (syndicate) looks like something we all had to do long time ago...

years ago there was a SAA (stock artist alliance) but it was a joke.

unfortunately these poorman's "unions" are always irrilevant and eventually they could even turn into a scam over time, for instance asking some yearly fees to join their club that basically is doing F all apart sending a few emails, a newsletter, a blog.

and the reason is shockingly simple : unions work well with factories and employees, but we're into the selling of digital products and the internet so it's quite a different scenario, we've zero leverage, we're dime a dozen and they know it.

Just imagine Getty opening the doors to any poor *insult removed* on Flickr .. they would get thousands of fresh contributors willing to join even for free in just 24 hrs.

matter of fact, unless you're the undisputed King of your niche we need them more than they need us !





« Last Edit: December 21, 2014, 11:43 by Hobostocker »

Noedelhap

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« Reply #52 on: December 21, 2014, 12:05 »
+5
I'm not against the EU per se, but these kinds of changes are ridiculous. Why bother businesses with a lot of extra administrative work for (smaller) businesses? I have no idea what benefits such a change brings.

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #53 on: December 21, 2014, 12:32 »
-11
I'm not against the EU per se, but these kinds of changes are ridiculous. Why bother businesses with a lot of extra administrative work for (smaller) businesses? I have no idea what benefits such a change brings.

because the party's over, they reached the very end of the boom/bust cycle started in 1945, they cannot compete with the asian economies, they don't have anymore any tangible technological advantage, no unified military and defence forces, no oil and gas supplies and totally dependent on russia and middle east.

i mean seriously the situation is going ouf of hand even in germany from what i'm reading, as bad as there are already nazi parties and neo-communists on the rise out of desperation from unemployeds and anyone who see no hope at the horizon.

if germany falls, the whole EU ceases to exist and the entire continent will go back to a neo-feudalist economy which is probably their actual plan judging from all the recent developments and looking at how they turned greece into a third world country overnight with average salaries even lower than Turkey which by opposite is doing very well *because* it's not in the EU.







« Reply #54 on: December 21, 2014, 13:05 »
+11
I think you are being over dramatic Hobostocker - looking at the situation from an almost apocalyptic all or nothing perspective. Like the doomers, conspiracists and fringe economists who predict economic meltdown year after year (always trying to sell Bitcoins and gold :) )

Europe will muddle through. The same as ever. It's not a race, for most ordinary people. (And soon enough Europe will be buying gas from Israel and Egypt anyhow as the huge Mediterranean Leviathan fields come on stream.)

« Reply #55 on: December 21, 2014, 13:27 »
0
Solution...looks good!

http://www.taxamo.com/

FEATURES
Applies correct EU VAT rate
Creates a quarterly EU MOSS return
Issues e-invoices
Securely stores evidence for 10 years
ECB currency conversion for EU MOSS

AND they have a Webinar on Monday Dec 22 for US Digital companies.
Questions will be taken live and can also be submitted in advance to [email protected]
http://www.taxamo.com/webinar-digital-sales-europe-2015-eu-vat-challenge/
« Last Edit: December 21, 2014, 13:35 by SSArtist »

« Reply #56 on: December 21, 2014, 15:20 »
+10
@ Hobostocker

Germany is fine. Unemployment is going down and much lower than in many other countries, people are highly educated and a lot of our energy comes from home grown eco friendly wind/water/solar. It creates jobs in Germany,drives new technologies that can be sold abroad and makes us independent from crazy countries. Also our economy is 70% middle class businesses with a huge variety of services and technology,so we dont depend as much on a few superlarge cooperations.

Plus people are really good at insulating homes,buying cars that use little gas or foregoing their cars completely,because we actually have a fully working public transport infrastructure. I sold my car in 2009, havent needed one since.

We hate taking loans and are careful with credit cards and people plan their financial lives very carefully.

So I know we love to complain and it might all look depressing from the outside, but this is overall a very safe and friendly place to live.

« Reply #57 on: December 21, 2014, 15:38 »
+2
@ Hobostocker

Germany is fine. Unemployment is going down and much lower than in many other countries, people are highly educated and a lot of our energy comes from home grown eco friendly wind/water/solar. It creates jobs in Germany,drives new technologies that can be sold abroad and makes us independent from crazy countries. Also our economy is 70% middle class businesses with a huge variety of services and technology,so we dont depend as much on a few superlarge cooperations.

Plus people are really good at insulating homes,buying cars that use little gas or foregoing their cars completely,because we actually have a fully working public transport infrastructure. I sold my car in 2009, havent needed one since.

We hate taking loans and are careful with credit cards and people plan their financial lives very carefully.

So I know we love to complain and it might all look depressing from the outside, but this is overall a very safe and friendly place to live.

Bravo cobalt

« Reply #58 on: December 21, 2014, 15:38 »
0
@ Hobostocker

Germany is fine. Unemployment is going down and much lower than in many other countries, people are highly educated and a lot of our energy comes from home grown eco friendly wind/water/solar. It creates jobs in Germany,drives new technologies that can be sold abroad and makes us independent from crazy countries. Also our economy is 70% middle class businesses with a huge variety of services and technology,so we dont depend as much on a few superlarge cooperations.

Plus people are really good at insulating homes,buying cars that use little gas or foregoing their cars completely,because we actually have a fully working public transport infrastructure. I sold my car in 2009, havent needed one since.

We hate taking loans and are careful with credit cards and people plan their financial lives very carefully.

So I know we love to complain and it might all look depressing from the outside, but this is overall a very safe and friendly place to live.


How do you stand with evictions numbers  and what % of people actually own their own homes ? Lets compare that with stats from 15 years ago ?

To save some time take this image  go to menu/edit/flip horizontal and you will and up with some nice artistic symmetry  ;)

 

 

« Reply #59 on: December 21, 2014, 16:48 »
0
Germany is fine. Unemployment is going down and much lower than in many other countries, people are highly educated and a lot of our energy comes from home grown eco friendly wind/water/solar. It creates jobs in Germany,drives new technologies that can be sold abroad and makes us independent from crazy countries. Also our economy is 70% middle class businesses with a huge variety of services and technology,so we dont depend as much on a few superlarge cooperations.

Plus people are really good at insulating homes,buying cars that use little gas or foregoing their cars completely,because we actually have a fully working public transport infrastructure. I sold my car in 2009, havent needed one since.

We hate taking loans and are careful with credit cards and people plan their financial lives very carefully.

So I know we love to complain and it might all look depressing from the outside, but this is overall a very safe and friendly place to live.

Must be another Germany where I live 8) ;D

« Reply #60 on: December 21, 2014, 17:31 »
+5
While there are certainly good aspects in the EU, it became an instrument for financial control along with the bank-controlled US, taking away power from the countries by applying unified measures against their own people, for example open immigration policy for non-EU countries - lowering wages, increasing unemployment and rising social welfare costs for the sake of economic growth.

« Reply #61 on: December 21, 2014, 18:19 »
+5
Topic: EU VAT Changes from January 2015! ALERT

« Reply #62 on: December 21, 2014, 21:49 »
0
Looking at it from a symbiostocker's perspective,  I can see at some point paypal starting a service to handle VAT on sellers' behalf..

That would be a smart move for them..

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #63 on: December 21, 2014, 23:40 »
0
Looking at it from a symbiostocker's perspective,  I can see at some point paypal starting a service to handle VAT on sellers' behalf..

That would be a smart move for them..

Yes, it would be logical that since there's demand for something like that Paypal and other payments gateways would start offering paid services to simplify the mess but so far i haven't heard any news, i think they're all waiting to see what's going to happen in the first months, as much as we know the EU could even trash the whole affair when they realize the cost/benefits involved are over the top.

In any case, it won't solve the core issues : american companies like Amazon and Goolgle are dominating their market and giving back to the EU while making billions in sales and advertising inside the EU and this wouldn't be tolerated in the US or China so why the EU should be an exception ?

Moreover, they're all based in Ireland just because of low taxation so once again Ireland get some scraps out of it and anyone else get nothing, just as Facebook and Google setting up in Delaware to enjoy the well known legal loopholes and favourable taxation but keeping their HQ in California giving just the absolute minimum necessary back to California.

I'm the last one in favor of over taxation actually i would go the way taxes are done in places like HongKong, Singapore, Panama, but we all know it can only work for small tax havens and not in big countries.

Moral of the story : the internet will soon be crippled and each country will impose draconian laws on e-commerce, it's a matter of when and not of IF, the days of the internet as a wild west are numbered and soon even buying some sh-it on Ebay will be seen as illegal smuggling, that's where all this tax-centric ideology is leading to.

And you know what, from a legal perspective they're 100% right, the problem is that this will badly affect society as a whole ... higher prices, higher taxes, higher inflation, less choice, less rights, more and more red tape.





Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #64 on: December 21, 2014, 23:48 »
-2
Must be another Germany where I live 8) ;D

that's normal.

all the economic indicators are leading to a very negative trend and negative outlook across the entire EU and including Germany but unless somebody comes and sh-its in their little garden they won't ever notice or care ....


Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #65 on: December 21, 2014, 23:59 »
0
I think you are being over dramatic Hobostocker - looking at the situation from an almost apocalyptic all or nothing perspective. Like the doomers, conspiracists and fringe economists who predict economic meltdown year after year (always trying to sell Bitcoins and gold :) )

Europe will muddle through. The same as ever. It's not a race, for most ordinary people. (And soon enough Europe will be buying gas from Israel and Egypt anyhow as the huge Mediterranean Leviathan fields come on stream.)

i'm just being realistic and by the way while you laugh at the so called "conspiracists" they were the only ones openly warning investors before the 2008 crash and burn, the 2001 dot-com boom, the foreclosure bubble, and many more cases.

the scary thing about the ongoing economic crisis in the EU is that it's been carefully planned by the EU itself as way to further their domination plan, it's not the result of unplanned economic strategies, nothing is going in the wrong direction, there's nothing to "fix" !

it's all going exactly as they agreed on their agenda and the next step will be the Trans Atlantic Trade and Investment Treaty (TTIP) which nobody wants apart the eurocrats and the bankers but it will be soon forced down everyone's throat may they like it or not.

on top of this we're been thrown into a new cold war with Russia with disastrous consequence for everybody not only in the EU but also abroad and this touches me personally as i happily live abroad and i can already the immediate consequences of all this on imported products, tourism, and much more.

America is to blame and it will soon fall.



Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #66 on: December 22, 2014, 00:09 »
-5
but this is overall a very safe and friendly place to live.

sure but not any longer if Nato's anti-russian plan is pushed further and if millions of people start losing their job overnight.

the creation of a happy middle class after 1945 and of social democracies has never been the goal of euro-style capitalism, they have been gained traction just as a direct answer to counterbalance communism in the East and in-house radical leftism.

after 1989 both menaces ceased to exist and as you can see it's all going downhill towards a neo-feudalism and oligopoly and the former DDR  is the living proof of this.

« Reply #67 on: December 22, 2014, 02:24 »
+7
To put it short: These new rules are 100 % crap and only way to avoid it is to use some VAT registered service. As long as VAT is around 20 % and just filling all papers would cost $50-100/MONTH (!!!) I would gladly pay 25-30 % commision. Cant wait to EU finally got bancrupt and finally get rid of this insane regulations.

Btw. I would NOT bother with this would I sit in US - by the US law, you should pay taxes where you are! Not where some other country (EU) thinks you should pay! This insane thinking says that while doing business you must obey (conflicting) law of dozens of countries worldwide and that is simply impossible.

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #68 on: December 22, 2014, 05:40 »
0
by the US law, you should pay taxes where you are! Not where some other country (EU) thinks you should pay!

actually it's not that way, US citizens working abroad are expected to pay taxes twice, where they're working abroad AND to the IRS !

this is unthinkable for europeans, we pay only where we work and that's exactly why millions of us are happily living and working overseas.

the only option for americans is to reject their US citizenship after earning a new one from another country, that's what one of the co-founders of Facebook did and it saved him millions of dollars, he had double nationality US/brazilian and now is Singaporean.






« Reply #69 on: December 22, 2014, 05:46 »
+2
the scary thing about the ongoing economic crisis in the EU is that it's been carefully planned by the EU itself as way to further their domination plan

This is a conspiracy theory. Besides which - if the EU (or any other govt like body) had deliberately planned an economic crisis we would today likely be enjoying the greatest economic boom known in the history of the world.

while you laugh at the so called "conspiracists" they were the only ones openly warning investors before the 2008 crash and burn, the 2001 dot-com boom, the foreclosure bubble, and many more cases.

If you continually call a crash you will sometimes be right. But that is not prescience, it's the stopped clock scenario. For the past 5 or so years, for example, the doomers have been constantly predicting a crash whilst the markets continued to rise - partly on the back of govt liquidity but also because there is genuine value and new opportunity. That's what markets do. They rise and fall but not in perfect patterns.

Today anti-intellectual conspiracy thinking is epidemic, like a disease. And mainstream. It provides a commonality between groups which have no other shared values other than being anti. So self-entitled miserable anti-capitalists find themselves weirdly aligned with anti-govt ultra-capitalists, gold nuts and Bitcoiners.

« Reply #70 on: December 22, 2014, 05:47 »
+1
Looking at it from a symbiostocker's perspective,  I can see at some point paypal starting a service to handle VAT on sellers' behalf..

I cannot see this happening. Since Paypal is not the seller and does not provide a marketplace.

« Reply #71 on: December 22, 2014, 06:13 »
+3
super interesting discussion going on BUT
Topic: EU VAT Changes from January 2015! ALERT

WEBINAR TODAY on EU VAT

DATE: Monday, December 22

TIME: 9AM US PST / 12PM US EST / 5PM UK / 6PM CET
http://www.taxamo.com/webinar-digital-sales-europe-2015-eu-vat-challenge/

P.S. It looks like PayPal and Stripe already working with these folks.

 :)
« Last Edit: December 22, 2014, 06:34 by SSArtist »

Semmick Photo

« Reply #72 on: December 22, 2014, 06:45 »
0

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #73 on: December 22, 2014, 06:45 »
-8
This is a conspiracy theory. Besides which - if the EU (or any other govt like body) had deliberately planned an economic crisis we would today likely be enjoying the greatest economic boom known in the history of the world.

Greece has been financially raped by the EU, it's not a conspiracy it's just the way it is, Germany and the german banks have launched a frontal assault on the Hellenic economy fully knowing the domino effect it would create on the greek society as a whole and they did the same for Cyprus grabbing money from bank accounts.

on the other side they are a lot more cautious playing the same game with bigger countries as it would backfire and destabilize the Euro, for instance Spain declared they had not even the money to pay civil servants salaries and the ECB promptly provided a few billions on the spot.

so, yes, deliberatly planned and also announced in every euro media if that matters, with open blackmailings against the greek elite too.

but again, this because the EU bankers decided to jump into the Austherity strategy, the alternative was to print even more money and depreciate the Euro a good 20-30% just as Japan did with the Yen, this at least would have pushed the economy up for a while, instead we're now in deflation and the buying power keep reaching new lows.




Semmick Photo

« Reply #74 on: December 22, 2014, 06:51 »
+9

Greece has been financially raped by the EU

Greece cooked the books and caused a massive problem for the EU, not the other way around. Hadnt it been for the EU, Greece would have defaulted and caused the whole of the EU to fall.


 

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