pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Sales on Shutterstock vs. Fotolia  (Read 29682 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

batman

« Reply #25 on: April 16, 2009, 12:19 »
0
I joined Shutterstock a year ago and stepped away from it because they rejected my first batch...... This may be due to the fact that those 10 images were bad flower shots :D

Two weeks ago I thought, why not try again?
So I gave it another try and 10/10 images were approved. :) I uploaded only 34 so far but they do very well and I already have 75 sales! I must say its worth it!!


so what do you think made the diff between first batch rejected and second 10/10 approval?
were they not all "bad flower shots" or what?


« Reply #26 on: April 16, 2009, 12:59 »
0
the difference was that I had one year experience in what stock agencies want and what sells and no there was not a single flower shot in them ;) I took good selling images and tried to spread the subjects.

« Reply #27 on: April 16, 2009, 13:37 »
0
I've been doing this for a few months, small portfolio,  but have made 10 times more on SS than on DT.    Almost all the sales on SS have been subs, but at least it maintains my interest. 

I've been hearing that over time SS goes down and DT takes off, but after 4 months I haven't seen any hint of that. If anything it's going the other way.  I recently had several "well covered subject" rejections at DT and haven't had a sale since - my ranking may have gone down as a result.   Those guys are mean.

As others have made clear, success at these sites varies with the type of photos you do.  For me, only SS and Fotolia have been worthwhile.  StockXpert is currently dead for new images and DT just hasn't done anything for me.  I don't do IS at this point - I don't like the attitude they project.




« Reply #28 on: April 16, 2009, 13:52 »
0
Same here - For me SS is doing better than FT, DT, BS and SX combined. But better yet is IS in first place. Fewer sales but more dollars per sale.
stockastic - what is the "bad attitude" you are getting at IS? Sure there are a few exclusives with big egos, but generally as a company I find them to be very professional and service oriented to contributors - whether exclusive or not. The upload is a bit of a pain, but worth it in my opinion - lots of views and daily sales. Even with a relatively small portfolio.

« Reply #29 on: April 16, 2009, 14:49 »
0
Like many people, I got accepted at IS and then found they rejected the same photos that got me approved in the first place  :)    A bit mind-boggling at first.  I did their tedious keywording on a batch of my images, and all but a few were rejected.  Review took 2 weeks, an appeal took a month.  I was trying to get going in microstock and IS was just too slow and tedious.  I let the handfull of survivors sit there for a few months, they each got 20-40 views but no sales. 

Meanwhile SS took 90% of what I submitted and gave me lots of sub sales, which at least is teaching me what catches buyers eyes. 

So by 'attitude' I don't mean anything personal, just all the hoops they want you to jump through, plus the extremely long review times.  And the *-up on the forums, and the hokey blogs.  But at some point I'll give IS another try. 

« Reply #30 on: April 16, 2009, 15:02 »
0
I make about 3x more at Shutterstock than Fotolia. Sales have always been pretty regular at Fotolia, but never as good as Shutterstock.

Fotolia is also starting to reject a lot more than Shutterstock so that is pretty frustrating.

Sales at SS are interesting too. I really see an increase in sales when im uploading regularly, but its not always new photos that are selling.   

DanP68

« Reply #31 on: April 16, 2009, 15:13 »
0
It's different for everyone Marc.  My Shutterstock earnings were several times more than Fotolia per month, even with images which were established (not new uploads).  Fotolia seems to be hit or miss.  Some people do great there, others make next to nothing.

« Reply #32 on: April 16, 2009, 15:18 »
0
Fotolia seems to be hit or miss.  Some people do great there, others make next to nothing.

I wonder why that is? Is there some big secret to success at FT that no one is sharing?

« Reply #33 on: April 16, 2009, 16:08 »
0
If there is a big secret to Fotolia I'd like to know it! I get a mere 2 or 3 sales a month. Plus a lot of rejected files.

Stockastic - your IS experience is not uncommon. Same happened to me where I got accepted with three photos and then two out of the three were rejected when submitted. I believe that the acceptance process is judging the composition, sense of stockworthiness, and basic things like that. Once they deem you worthy to supply stock to them, then they hammer you on the little details artifacting, purple fringing and model release etc. - assuming you have the basic stock skills and now just need to refine the details. It works because I quickly learned to deal with those little nasties and now my approval rating at IS is quite strong compared to what it used to be. And if you can crank out some vectors, they can be very lucrative. I have just a handful and the sell very well!

« Reply #34 on: April 16, 2009, 17:21 »
0
I'd like to get into vectors, and I think I could do some that would sell, but I know zero about the techniques in use today.  I don't even know what applications people are using to create the vectors I see.  Of course many are obviously 3D renderings requiring a major software investment.  But where are the 2D things coming from? Photoshop?  Excuse my ignorance - I'm strictly a photographic guy. 

baz777

  • Im not sociable so I dont use social media
« Reply #35 on: April 16, 2009, 17:39 »
0
I'd like to get into vectors, and I think I could do some that would sell, but I know zero about the techniques in use today.  I don't even know what applications people are using to create the vectors I see.  Of course many are obviously 3D renderings requiring a major software investment.  But where are the 2D things coming from? Photoshop?  Excuse my ignorance - I'm strictly a photographic guy. 

For vectors I use Adobe Illustrator CS3, although I do nearly all my preparation work in AutoCAD and then import into illustrator.

« Reply #36 on: April 16, 2009, 17:53 »
0
Ah, Adobe Illustrator and AutoCAD - pretty much what I thought - major investments.   


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
17 Replies
18796 Views
Last post December 12, 2006, 11:06
by MiguelAngelo
5 Replies
4386 Views
Last post June 23, 2006, 12:23
by leaf
3 Replies
4041 Views
Last post April 01, 2015, 06:57
by helloitsme
8 Replies
3832 Views
Last post October 02, 2015, 17:37
by helloitsme
17 Replies
7550 Views
Last post February 15, 2017, 08:33
by stuttershock

Sponsors

Mega Bundle of 5,900+ Professional Lightroom Presets

Microstock Poll Results

Sponsors

3100 Posing Cards Bundle