pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: How to straighten cups and plates  (Read 7825 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« on: May 28, 2016, 06:59 »
0
Sorry to ask but I can't find the answer online. When I take a photo of a plate and cup on saucer next to it my plate and saucer lean to the right and left. That looks horrible. How can I correct that? I do have Lightroom 6 and Affinity Photo but can't work out how to get these plates, saucers, cups straight.


« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2016, 08:56 »
+1
shoot 35mm or up, or in post, lightroom, use manual lens corrections, vertical and horizontal, but you need enough space around because the image will be cropped

substancep

  • Medical, science, nature, and macro photography

« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2016, 09:28 »
0
Do you have an image to illustrate what you mean?  If you are talking about perfectly straight lines, then you have to shoot it straight on.

alno

« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2016, 09:57 »
0
That's right, as Microstockphoto said, use not wide angle lens. If you are using wide angle lens then try not to lean lens/camera upwards or downwards, try to shoot from the level of a plate.

« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2016, 13:36 »
+3
The further away you are, with a longer lens, the straighter it will be.

« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2016, 02:12 »
0
I shoot with a Sony RX100M3. I can't go further away. I shoot at a 45 degree angle down. I use a tripod and because of that always zoom in between 50 to 65mm. I now bought  a slider. That way I don't have to zoom that much.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk


« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2016, 02:15 »
0
The plate on the left side looks as if it's slipping off the table to the left and the saucer with cup on the right is also not straight. I don't have a wide angle lens. It's just the zoom lens that's fixed to my camera.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk


« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2016, 02:17 »
0
I clicked on vertical ....in Lightroom but that effects the whole image and not the plate on the table. I want to show what's on the plate. If I shoot totally from above the plates look fine. If I shoot straight on you can't see so nice what's on the plate. These DSLR cameras are just so very heavy.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk


« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2016, 02:20 »
0
I think I have deleted that photo. I didn't want to give it to microstock. I picked up a magazine from a supermarket and there is an image with 2 water glasses. They are also not straight.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk


« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2016, 02:43 »
0
Things that are not straight can be OK provided its obvious there not meant to be straight if they are just slightly out it looks wrong if its a lot it can be done for effect

« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2016, 03:56 »
0
Hello, I just checked. The photo I was talking about I have deleted but I have a similar one. I have attached it. This plate is only very slightly leaning to the right. On the photo with 2 plates they were leaning to the sides much more. A man said it can be corrected in Photoshop but he didn't mention how. This photo is not edited yet. I only quickly converted it to a Jpeg. What am I doing wrong? Thank you very much for your help. It means a lot to me.

« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2016, 03:58 »
0
Can I send this photo after editing to agencies or is it too much leaning to one side? As I said, when I use two, like a plate on the left and a saucer plus cup on the right side it's even worse.

« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2016, 04:41 »
0
Can I send this photo after editing to agencies or is it too much leaning to one side? As I said, when I use two, like a plate on the left and a saucer plus cup on the right side it's even worse.

This is how optics work. It's physics, you can't magically change it without moving further away. Your zoom lens probably goes from wide-angle to normal, so yes, it is a wide-angle lens. It wouldn't be any different with an expensive DSLR.

If you are close to two objects and point to the middle they will both look like they're leaning out to the sides. If you move the camera further away and zoom in, this will not be as visible.

If you want everything to be perfect you can take two pictures and put them together in Photoshop. This is how you battle depth-of-field issues when you have to be close, but want everything in focus. You take several pictures with different focus points and put them together in Photoshop.

« Reply #13 on: May 29, 2016, 04:44 »
0
Thank you soooo much. I will try that next time. I wanted a close up and my lens goes only to 70mm.

« Reply #14 on: May 29, 2016, 05:05 »
0
I don't have Photoshop. I use Affinity Photo but mainly Lightroom.. I really want to get that right when I take the photo. I don't have much space where I am taking the photos but a huge window front. I can only free up another 50cm. People who do microstock have to be ready multi talented. You have to be food stylist, photographer and editing genius all in one. 

« Reply #15 on: May 29, 2016, 05:12 »
0
I just checked on DT. There are photos with cups and saucers "falling" off the table. I am so surprised. And they got downloaded. I think it looks awful. Before I started with microstock I took cityscape and landscape photos only. Macro and food photography is totally new to me.

« Reply #16 on: May 29, 2016, 05:50 »
+1
You have to be food stylist, photographer and editing genius all in one.

Yes, which is true for most studio photography. It is not easy to create "perfect" pictures - it takes a lot of skill and work. Post-processing is a big part and if you want to get serious I would get Photoshop. Lightroom only goes so far when it comes to editing details.

« Reply #17 on: May 29, 2016, 06:07 »
0
I had a free trial of Photoshop Elements 14 and didn't like it at all. Affiniti Photo can do a lot. More than I know and normally use. It's just that there are hardly any tutorials apart from the basic ones. I use the Topaz Collection but mainly for my art images not for microstock. I just don't want the Adobe monthly subscription. I have only sold 2 images so far on microstock and absolutely nothing on Photo4me.

« Reply #18 on: May 29, 2016, 06:43 »
0
Affinity will do just fine.
And like increasingdifficulty posted, you should stack images when you have dof issues.

« Reply #19 on: May 29, 2016, 13:08 »
0
I don't have Photoshop. I use Affinity Photo but mainly Lightroom.. I really want to get that right when I take the photo. I don't have much space where I am taking the photos but a huge window front. I can only free up another 50cm. People who do microstock have to be ready multi talented. You have to be food stylist, photographer and editing genius all in one.

In Affinity Photo, when you have your image in Develop Mode, select the Lens panel on the right of the screen and then check to enable Lens Correction. There are several sliders there that will allow you to make various adjustments that might help.

« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2016, 13:28 »
0
Hello Polar, thank you very much. I just tried it out and it worked. I had to crop a lot. I worked on the photo with one plate but with one right and one left it wouldn't work I guess.

« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2016, 13:33 »
0
When I have a photo with 2 plates one is leaning to the right and the other to the left. Then rotation won't work. But it worked great on the photo with one plate.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk


« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2016, 14:00 »
0
When I have a photo with 2 plates one is leaning to the right and the other to the left. Then rotation won't work. But it worked great on the photo with one plate.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk

Did you only use the rotation slider? The distortion slider would probably be more useful for something that needs to be adjusted on both sides. The vertical and horizontal sliders might also be useful.

Once you develop the image and are in the Photo persona, you can go to Filters>Distort>Perspective for additional options for adjusting both sides of the image. (I find this useful for adjusting leaning buildings.) This list also includes the lens correction filter, similar to what you have in the Develop persona.

You need to use a delicate touch with all of these tools to avoid making things look unnatural. Depending on the nature of the original shot, you won't necessarily get a perfect result but you can usually get closer to what you want.

ETA: if you think you're going to have to use these tools, it would be a good idea to allow enough room around the outer edges of the image while shooting to permit the inevitable cropping that occurs.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2016, 14:06 by polar »

« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2016, 17:10 »
0
You could try warping it out in Photoshop, if your shots are all similar you could even create an action to do it for you ... I'd be inclined to downsample it quite a bit before submitting afterward though but, idk ... get a ladder and a taller tripod ...

« Reply #24 on: May 30, 2016, 03:00 »
0
Warping I have not tried. I didn't get that idea. I will try that. Thank you. My tripod goes up to 60.24 inch. Is that high enough? If I take a shot directly from above I do it handheld but have to use f5.6. I so don't want to increase the ISO. I use ISO80 but still get noise. I was thinking of buying a tripod with an arm that can reach over the table but they are very heavy. Yesterday I checked for ice cream sundaes on DT and was totally shocked to see that so many really good images didn't get one download. Some had 1 download in 4 years. Is it all worth it the expenses and time.... I wanted to make one and take a photo of one. Now I won't. 6004 mango juice images. They don't need any more. Maybe food photography is a bad idea for microstock. I am astonished that they are still taking photos. Aren't buyers frustrated to go through 6004 mango juice images....?


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
8 Replies
15520 Views
Last post June 07, 2010, 12:56
by melastmohican
6 Replies
1694 Views
Last post March 06, 2019, 12:41
by cathyslife

Sponsors

Mega Bundle of 5,900+ Professional Lightroom Presets

Microstock Poll Results

Sponsors

3100 Posing Cards Bundle