pancakes

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Author Topic: How to straighten cups and plates  (Read 7819 times)

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« Reply #25 on: May 30, 2016, 03:24 »
+1
that photo is not worth the time and effort


« Reply #26 on: May 30, 2016, 03:33 »
0
I agree. That was the last one I took. Just wanted to see how it looks but I didn't like it. The better one has two plates and whole cappuccino cupcakes... This one is the worst I have taken so far. But I am not talking about this one photo. I have seen the most amazing images of ice cream sundaes with no download. I felt really sorry for the person who went through all that trouble to take this beautiful photo.

« Reply #27 on: May 30, 2016, 04:02 »
0
Is it all worth it the expenses and time....

Probably not... But do it if you think it's fun.

Dreamstime isn't really selling much anyway, so if you see 1 download there it could mean 50 on SS.

« Reply #28 on: May 30, 2016, 04:08 »
0
There was one image of ice cream sundae which was so beautiful that I felt like buying it as print for my kitchen. I thought about that person who bought the expensive glasses and made it look so beautiful, then took the photo and edited it and did not get a sale.

« Reply #29 on: May 30, 2016, 04:55 »
0
It all depends on whether you're doing it just to make money, or if it's something that feels like a hobby that you would do anyway, but nice to make money as well.

I spent around $18,000 on equipment and traveling over the last year or so, and it will probably be another 6 months before I break even.

But I would still have traveled, and I love standing on top of a mountain making a time-lapse. It's exciting when they sell, but it's not like it felt like I HAD to do that for work.

« Reply #30 on: May 30, 2016, 05:11 »
0
That sounds a lot more exciting than food photography.  :)

« Reply #31 on: May 30, 2016, 06:20 »
0
Generally unless the picture is something special  its really not worth spending much time on it as you've seen from sales volumes

« Reply #32 on: May 30, 2016, 06:25 »
0
You are right Pauws99. I am giving up food photography for microstock. Far too time consuming.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk


Chichikov

« Reply #33 on: May 30, 2016, 07:05 »
+2
Put some hold below the plates (on their external side) to tilt them slightly when shooting ...
« Last Edit: May 30, 2016, 07:07 by Chichikov »

Chichikov

« Reply #34 on: May 30, 2016, 07:06 »
0
[double post]

Fudio

« Reply #35 on: May 30, 2016, 09:23 »
+2
HappyBunny is this what you are looking for? If so, your problem is not with optics or lens distortion but with keeping your tripod level to the plane of your plate. Do you use a ballhead or just try to level using your tripod legs? Chichikov has a good idea, but it shouldn't be necessary with this type of shot. Propping the plate from behind is done all the time to show more of the plate and food while keeping the background perspective in control.

You mentioned having trouble with layflat or overhead shots...if you have a spot where you can attach to the ceiling you might want to have a look at these. I find them indispensable;

http://www.amazon.com/Interfit-INT309-Wall-Mounting-Boom/dp/B002X71H3M/ref=pd_sim_229_2?ie=UTF8&dpID=31QuU4p2U-L&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR160%2C160_&refRID=0BHK51FMPTP01HP7D28J''

http://www.amazon.com/Flashpoint-Wall-Mount-Arm-21/dp/B009N804D8/ref=pd_bxgy_421_img_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=0F20J3BBSRCJRYKJERG3

One more thing. I personally wouldn't fret too much about the plate angle here. Sometimes a slight tilt can add just the right dynamic bump to an otherwise flat and lifeless image.

« Reply #36 on: May 30, 2016, 09:43 »
+4
Hello, I just checked. The photo I was talking about I have deleted but I have a similar one. I have attached it. This plate is only very slightly leaning to the right. On the photo with 2 plates they were leaning to the sides much more. A man said it can be corrected in Photoshop but he didn't mention how. This photo is not edited yet. I only quickly converted it to a Jpeg. What am I doing wrong? Thank you very much for your help. It means a lot to me.

I'm still not sure what "leaning to the right" means.  It should look exactly like it did through the viewfinder when you shot it.  If you didn't like it then, try different arrangements until you get a composition you like.  If you feel it looks rotated, then rotate your camera the other way.  Or rotate the plate.  Or rotate the napkin.

I'd be more worried about focus, though.

« Reply #37 on: May 30, 2016, 13:16 »
0
A stack of coins comes in handy for straitening things like glasses cups etc,just place enough of them under the side of the object that needs straightened, I keep a jar of coins just for this. 

« Reply #38 on: May 30, 2016, 13:33 »
0
Fudio, my tripod has no ballhead. It's easier without one for me. Thank you for the links. I will look into it.

« Reply #39 on: May 30, 2016, 13:37 »
0
Thank you all for your time and your great ideas. Sean Locke,  yes I am worried about my focus. I am slowly getting angry because a much cheaper Sony camera makes better photos. Years ago I took photos with an expensive camera on film and never managed to get them out of focus. I really don't know what this camera is doing.

« Reply #40 on: July 04, 2016, 01:54 »
0
The further away you are, with a longer lens, the straighter it will be.

« Reply #41 on: July 04, 2016, 04:55 »
0
The shallow depth of field from shooting close to the subject makes it essential that you select the right point to focus on. It's a matter of judgement.
As for the "falling off" problem, it sounds like barrel distortion on a poorly corrected wide-angle lens. It's possible to make corrections for that in editing programs but it would be a major hassle. And as Sean says, you should recognise at the time you take the shot that it doesn't look right - seeing something that doesn't work in the viewfinder makes me feel vaguely sick (but maybe I'm a bit odd). If you get the feeling when composing that the whole thing doesn't work, you need to reposition things until the composition feels pleasing.
If you find a particular lens doesn't work nicely at the range you like to shoot from, really the only answer is to switch to a camera or lens which suits you better.


 

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