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Author Topic: Kite Aerial Photography rig on the cheap  (Read 21955 times)

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Roadrunner

  • Roadrunner
« Reply #25 on: July 31, 2012, 13:22 »
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Looks like my memory banks are still working.

A review of the site indicates we need a 15ft. Blimp $625.  We already have the cameras; so may be we could figure out how to adapt the kite system (gimbal/support) for carrying the camera to the payload.  Anybody think it caan be rigged?

It would be cheaper than the $5,000 to $6,000 for the complete 15ft system by the blimp company.

What atre your thoughts Racephoto?  You seem to have a good working knowledge along these lines.  If we could do this we would dhave a breakthrougjh. ;D


« Reply #26 on: July 31, 2012, 15:46 »
0
A quick Google search found a page for camera blimps - http://www.aerialproducts.com/blimps/camera-blimps.html


I got a bit excited at first... but then I started to think that they need to be deflated when transported (I don't have a heavy-duty truck!). The problem is the price of helium, it ain't cheap...

Roadrunner

  • Roadrunner
« Reply #27 on: July 31, 2012, 15:52 »
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Good point Perry; looks like we would have to consider buying a used Moving Van!  That is a deal breaker. :(

« Reply #28 on: July 31, 2012, 16:31 »
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I have an old Eos 5D, but it seems a bit heavy... what camera would you suggest to use instead of it? What counts: weight/resolution/price

I'm wondering about the new Nokia 808 phone, would it be possible for some one to develop a "aerial photography app"? You know, it could be remote controlled by another phone or via internet, and it could send the images straight to internet. It could have an interval timer, bracketing etc. The images would be of nice quality and the camera would be very light (169g). Maybe some servos could be connected to the USB of the phone to remote control pan/tilt etc. etc.
Now go work on it! :)
« Last Edit: July 31, 2012, 16:34 by Perry »

« Reply #29 on: July 31, 2012, 20:27 »
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for weight and quality I'd check out the Canon t3i type cameras (or t2i) or perhaps the Olympus em-5

« Reply #30 on: August 01, 2012, 02:00 »
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The new Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 might be good for this.  It's a small lightweight point and shoot but has a bigger sensor and improved image quality on similar sized cameras.  It also has very high quality video.

« Reply #31 on: August 01, 2012, 06:30 »
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The new Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 might be good for this.  It's a small lightweight point and shoot but has a bigger sensor and improved image quality on similar sized cameras.  It also has very high quality video.

That Sony looks almost perfect for the job. It could of course be a bit cheaper... I'm too lazy to search for this: is there a possibility to use a remote release of some kind on the Sony?

« Reply #32 on: August 01, 2012, 07:24 »
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Magic Lantern is now available for 5D Mark II and a slew of other Canon DSLRs in a single download. You can get it at www.magiclantern.fm. If you do any video using your camera, or even just for time lapses, it's is HIGHLY recommended! Built-in intervalometer w/ bulb-ramping makes it a great time lapse tool.

« Reply #33 on: August 01, 2012, 12:38 »
0
Magic Lantern is now available for 5D Mark II and a slew of other Canon DSLRs in a single download. You can get it at www.magiclantern.fm. If you do any video using your camera, or even just for time lapses, it's is HIGHLY recommended! Built-in intervalometer w/ bulb-ramping makes it a great time lapse tool.


thanks for the info.  I'll have to check it out again.  Being able to use an invertvalometer on the kite without actually having an intervalometer would be really ideal.

RacePhoto

« Reply #34 on: August 02, 2012, 12:19 »
0
Magic Lantern is now available for 5D Mark II and a slew of other Canon DSLRs in a single download. You can get it at www.magiclantern.fm. If you do any video using your camera, or even just for time lapses, it's is HIGHLY recommended! Built-in intervalometer w/ bulb-ramping makes it a great time lapse tool.


thanks for the info.  I'll have to check it out again.  Being able to use an invertvalometer on the kite without actually having an intervalometer would be really ideal.


I hate to be asking, but Why? I have a few of the remotes already for time lapse and they weigh 3oz, so what's the issue?

Funny because one of the sites I was looking at today for poles has a wired remote for shooting from the end of the stick. I made a wireless, so that would mean, no spool of wire and all that added weight. Same for a kite or drone (oops, watch out, just threw in a new curve ball!) but wireless remote that's good for clicking the shutter, and no wires, no timed shutter release, yes it adds weight.

Drones? Can one lift a camera with good resolution. I want a DSLR drone now. LOL  ;D

« Reply #35 on: August 02, 2012, 14:36 »
0
Magic Lantern is now available for 5D Mark II and a slew of other Canon DSLRs in a single download. You can get it at www.magiclantern.fm. If you do any video using your camera, or even just for time lapses, it's is HIGHLY recommended! Built-in intervalometer w/ bulb-ramping makes it a great time lapse tool.


thanks for the info.  I'll have to check it out again.  Being able to use an invertvalometer on the kite without actually having an intervalometer would be really ideal.


I hate to be asking, but Why? I have a few of the remotes already for time lapse and they weigh 3oz, so what's the issue?

Funny because one of the sites I was looking at today for poles has a wired remote for shooting from the end of the stick. I made a wireless, so that would mean, no spool of wire and all that added weight. Same for a kite or drone (oops, watch out, just threw in a new curve ball!) but wireless remote that's good for clicking the shutter, and no wires, no timed shutter release, yes it adds weight.

Drones? Can one lift a camera with good resolution. I want a DSLR drone now. LOL  ;D


With kites, every gram counts.  They don't have much lift to start with so saving the weight of the intervalometer would be welcomed even if small.  The biggest reason for me though is just the pain of attaching the cords and intervalometer to the rig.  There isn't really a good place for it.  I have it attached to the bottom with velcro but there is still cords going here and there and sometimes it falls off and often has dead batteries.  Essentially it would just be a welcomed thing to get rid of.  

Yes, if you want to spend the money there are plenty of drones to carry a heavy SLR.  People use them with the RED camera and of course the 5D with L glass or other similar cameras.

RacePhoto

« Reply #36 on: August 02, 2012, 16:44 »
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With kites, every gram counts.  They don't have much lift to start with so saving the weight of the intervalometer would be welcomed even if small.  The biggest reason for me though is just the pain of attaching the cords and intervalometer to the rig.  There isn't really a good place for it.  I have it attached to the bottom with velcro but there is still cords going here and there and sometimes it falls off and often has dead batteries.  Essentially it would just be a welcomed thing to get rid of.  

Yes, if you want to spend the money there are plenty of drones to carry a heavy SLR.  People use them with the RED camera and of course the 5D with L glass or other similar cameras.

Just can't wait to go searching for drones powerful enough to lift a DSLR with something better than a kit lens. I have a T2i now (so light!) And it came with the "cute" kit lens. I think my 40-D without a lens weighs more. Kind of cool. 18MP and it does 1080p HD video. But before confusing things, I want to do stills from elevation with it... not video. Just bought it for the video and I'm having fun with it as an all around grab cam.

« Reply #37 on: August 02, 2012, 19:17 »
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With kites, every gram counts.  They don't have much lift to start with so saving the weight of the intervalometer would be welcomed even if small.  The biggest reason for me though is just the pain of attaching the cords and intervalometer to the rig.  There isn't really a good place for it.  I have it attached to the bottom with velcro but there is still cords going here and there and sometimes it falls off and often has dead batteries.  Essentially it would just be a welcomed thing to get rid of.  

Yes, if you want to spend the money there are plenty of drones to carry a heavy SLR.  People use them with the RED camera and of course the 5D with L glass or other similar cameras.

Just can't wait to go searching for drones powerful enough to lift a DSLR with something better than a kit lens. I have a T2i now (so light!) And it came with the "cute" kit lens. I think my 40-D without a lens weighs more. Kind of cool. 18MP and it does 1080p HD video. But before confusing things, I want to do stills from elevation with it... not video. Just bought it for the video and I'm having fun with it as an all around grab cam.

a few good search terms are octocopter, multicopter, mikrokopter, CineStar, Droidworx

« Reply #38 on: August 02, 2012, 22:20 »
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Like Leaf stated, there are a number of great options for (really!) flying your DSLR. They start at about $1,000 USD. After more practice with my AR Drone 2.0, I plan to purchase one myself to take the video production portion of my business to the next level (pun intended  :D)

« Reply #39 on: August 02, 2012, 22:23 »
0
Quote
I hate to be asking, but Why? I have a few of the remotes already for time lapse and they weigh 3oz, so what's the issue?

There are many other features included in Magic Lantern in addition to the intervalometer, but I would think that bulb-ramping would be of tremendous value when shooting very early/late in the day.

« Reply #40 on: August 02, 2012, 23:15 »
0
Quote
I hate to be asking, but Why? I have a few of the remotes already for time lapse and they weigh 3oz, so what's the issue?

There are many other features included in Magic Lantern in addition to the intervalometer, but I would think that bulb-ramping would be of tremendous value when shooting very early/late in the day.

I've never really understood the value of bulb ramping.  I understand that you need to change the exposure throughout the timelapse but why would you want it to be automatic.  You don't know before you start the timelapse how dark the sky is going to be in 1 hour so how can you put in your settings you want the camera to reach in an hour.  Isn't it better to manually bulb ramp the time lapse and change the settings underway?  Or am I misunderstanding things?

« Reply #41 on: August 03, 2012, 20:45 »
0
Bulb ramping is most useful when you have your camera on a motorized slider or something else where you can't get to it to change settings. Some of the most beautiful time lapses I've ever seen were bulb ramps on a motorized slider around sunset/sunrise.


 

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