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Author Topic: negs and slides to digital images at a push of a button . what do you think?  (Read 5120 times)

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« on: May 14, 2009, 16:00 »
0
just got this in one of my mail. it's a product costing 150 bucks. here's the specs:
scans 35mm neg and slides
5MP cmos sensor
10 bits per colour channel for data conversion
fixed focus
AE control
Auto Color Balance
3 white LED back light source.
incl software to edut and resize as well as convert neg to postivies.
+ 20 buck S&H

what do you think? anyone has one? i suppose it 'll do for home users,
but wonder if this is any better than the HP scanner i bought  3 years ago, which is not only very slow but also not very good.

i do have quite a bit of good images on 35 slides and neg for stock
but never had much luck converting them.

in fact, i even have some color 4x5 positives from my view camera workshop days
that would be stunning if i know how to digitalize them. imagine the quality of a 4x5 positives. perfect for XXL lol . Alamy would be the best for those.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2009, 16:04 by Perseus »


RacePhoto

« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2009, 16:40 »
0
just got this in one of my mail. it's a product costing 150 bucks. here's the specs:
scans 35mm neg and slides
5MP cmos sensor
10 bits per colour channel for data conversion
fixed focus
AE control
Auto Color Balance
3 white LED back light source.
incl software to edut and resize as well as convert neg to postivies.
+ 20 buck S&H

what do you think? anyone has one? i suppose it 'll do for home users,
but wonder if this is any better than the HP scanner i bought  3 years ago, which is not only very slow but also not very good.

i do have quite a bit of good images on 35 slides and neg for stock
but never had much luck converting them.

in fact, i even have some color 4x5 positives from my view camera workshop days
that would be stunning if i know how to digitalize them. imagine the quality of a 4x5 positives. perfect for XXL lol . Alamy would be the best for those.

CRAP! Junk! Garbage! Toy! Please don't waste your money.

Good copywriting to make a 5mp digital camera in a box, seem to be something it isn't. Did you find the $89 version or one of the places who sells them for more?

https://www.sharperimageconverter.com/?cid=607168

If you want a good scanner, you're going to pay for a good scanner. There's no magic inexpensive technology, or Nikon wouldn't be able to get thousands for their scanners. Would They? Want cheap but good native resolution? Epson V300 flatbed, 4800 dpi optical resolution, is under $100 if you watch for a sale.

« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2009, 16:48 »
0
Thx Racephoto. I was a bit wary considering it came in the junk mail like most "junks".
btw, would the epson scan 2/14 and 4x5? my HP does up to 21/4 but to get good quality it would take forever to scan. so I chucked it aside.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2009, 16:50 by Perseus »

RacePhoto

« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2009, 17:11 »
0
Thx Racephoto. I was a bit wary considering it came in the junk mail like most "junks".
btw, would the epson scan 2/14 and 4x5? my HP does up to 21/4 but to get good quality it would take forever to scan. so I chucked it aside.

Sure but you saved someone else from believing the spam message and buying one of these?  ;D

My 2 1/4s are slides and have fungus growing on them, turning purple as well, any scans are for personal use only. Some are B&W from the 70s. In either case, nothing I'm worried about trying to convert and sell. I might as well spend my time on new images. Translation: I don't have a clue. I don't scan my 35mm slides or film either, I just don't find anything that's worth the time or effort. For personal copies, I have a HP S-20 SCSI scanner. That should tell you how not serious I am about converting my film to digital.

Try this... Camera with Macro capability, slide, white paper on the wall. (daylight)   C<] |  Makes a nice simple slide copier.  :D  For those who want to get fancy, use a tripod for the camera and another with a spring clamp to hold the slide perfectly parallel. Snap, your expensive camera is now a high resolution slide copier.

WarrenPrice

« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2009, 19:40 »
0


Try this... Camera with Macro capability, slide, white paper on the wall. (daylight)   C<] |  Makes a nice simple slide copier.  :D  For those who want to get fancy, use a tripod for the camera and another with a spring clamp to hold the slide perfectly parallel. Snap, your expensive camera is now a high resolution slide copier.


Good idea.  I had been considering exactly that. 

I just bought a used Epson 4180.  It works with 2 1/4 and has resolution up to 4800.  But ... it ain't the solution.  I tried some old travel slides at DT and had a reviewer at CutCaster give me some special attention.  My travel slides are some great memories  ... no more.   ::)

« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2009, 01:36 »
0
I recently got an epson v500 for scanning my 35mm, have not tried to submit them anyware but so far great for personal use. The digital ice works great although it can be a little slow.

« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2009, 05:57 »
0
I had a lot of experience with the Nikon Coolscan 5000 ED Scanner a few years back and never got the quality I needed, don't get me wrong, it was good enought for small prints but that is about it.  For top quality you have to start with an least an Imacon Scanner ($$) if you don't want to spend the money for a drum scan.

E

« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2009, 06:50 »
0
What is specially difficult to scan is Fujifilm (Velvia and Provia) from my experience. If I remember correctly, these films have an extra emulsion layer so darks are a problem.

E

« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2009, 11:47 »
0
hi, this is what i did when i wanted to scan my father's slides (~1000 done last year, ~2500 to go, what was i thinking? :-\)

i got an old bellows and slide copier from mercadolibre (the argentine version of ebay): the "pentax auto bellows m set"  (costed me something 60-70 USD)
you have to mount the bellows on the camera, the lens in the bellows (F35-80 in my case, it's supposed to work with a 50 on film but in a crop camera i found it needs something around 70mm), and then the slide copier in front of everything else.
then you set the white balance with the white plastic in the slide copier, put a slide in the copier, focus on the slide (with the bellow's rails) and close the lens diafragm (has to be and old lens with aperture ring, i used f/16, as more will difract a lot and less ended up out of focus because the slides were not exactly flat in my case).
now the setup is ready the procedure is: put slide -> green button (auto exposure in manual mode in a pentax) -> shoot. change slide and repeat.

it's not the easiest way, and not a one click way (two when already setup), but it gives 10mp (or whatever your camera has) "copies" of your slides. and you can also use the bellows for macros beyond 1:1.

note: all this works in a pentax body, i guess other brands made their own bellows (or you can use an old M42 with an adapter) and probably have a different way of metering (the k10d will meter even without a lens (and that's how the camera detects the bellows, it doesn't), not sure if all cameras will do that).

« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2009, 11:50 »
0
hi, this is what i did when i wanted to scan my father's slides (~1000 done last year, ~2500 to go, what was i thinking? :-\)

i got an old bellows and slide copier from mercadolibre (the argentine version of ebay): the "pentax auto bellows m set"  (costed me something 60-70 USD)
you have to mount the bellows on the camera, the lens in the bellows (F35-80 in my case, it's supposed to work with a 50 on film but in a crop camera i found it needs something around 70mm), and then the slide copier in front of everything else.
then you set the white balance with the white plastic in the slide copier, put a slide in the copier, focus on the slide (with the bellow's rails) and close the lens diafragm (has to be and old lens with aperture ring, i used f/16, as more will difract a lot and less ended up out of focus because the slides were not exactly flat in my case).
now the setup is ready the procedure is: put slide -> green button (auto exposure in manual mode in a pentax) -> shoot. change slide and repeat.

it's not the easiest way, and not a one click way (two when already setup), but it gives 10mp (or whatever your camera has) "copies" of your slides. and you can also use the bellows for macros beyond 1:1.

note: all this works in a pentax body, i guess other brands made their own bellows (or you can use an old M42 with an adapter) and probably have a different way of metering (the k10d will meter even without a lens (and that's how the camera detects the bellows, it doesn't), not sure if all cameras will do that).

this is fab b79 (love your freaky eye avatar, btw)...
i have a k20d, which is perfect since your case is with the k10d.
good show,matey! i gave you a heart for this.  8)


« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2009, 11:56 »
0
muchos agradecimientos b79 ! PURA VIDA!
« Last Edit: May 15, 2009, 12:01 by Perseus »


 

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