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Author Topic: Ode to the Snapshot  (Read 2359 times)

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« on: June 09, 2015, 22:17 »
0
     My definition of a "snapshot" is: Handheld. 30 seconds or less to compose. Less than perfect lighting. Spontaneous....you see something unique or "sellable" and you capture it.
     My question: Can you find success shooting "snapshots"? And to you who spend gobs of money renting a studio. Hiring models. Using state of the art equipment capturing that perfect composition of the smiling, middle-aged female CEO leaning across the desk and shaking hands with the enamoured client......do you, on occasion submit "snapshots" and find success?



WeatherENG

« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2015, 22:51 »
0
     My definition of a "snapshot" is: Handheld. 30 seconds or less to compose. Less than perfect lighting. Spontaneous....you see something unique or "sellable" and you capture it.
     My question: Can you find success shooting "snapshots"? And to you who spend gobs of money renting a studio. Hiring models. Using state of the art equipment capturing that perfect composition of the smiling, middle-aged female CEO leaning across the desk and shaking hands with the enamoured client......do you, on occasion submit "snapshots" and find success?


I am only in video right now but almost all of my video content, my severe weather stuff, on campus stuff with college and university students and my environment themed vis of smoke stacks and such to my cars sliding and crashing caught on camera are less than perfect in the state of the art equipment and lighting department and they sell on Pond5 and thankfully Pond5 accepts said content.

My opinion is this, does every customer want perfect? some do, obviously some prefer a more natural or newsy look, maybe the same could be true for stills?  Look at what's passing for pro on TV news these days....viewers using cell phones and those phones are not on tripods either, trends and styles change on a dime these days, I wouldn't rule anything in or out, I'd do both, perfect and slightly less than perfect or snapshots as you call them.

M

http://www.pond5.com/artist/WeatherENG

http://www.pond5.com/stock-video-footage-sound-effects-music-after-effects-photos-illustrations-images-3d-models/1/artist%3AWeatherENG.html#1

dpimborough

« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2015, 06:36 »
+1
I've submitted a number of snapshots in the past and found that not only were they accepted but that they also sold very well.

Some of my best selling images were snap shots (as you defined them) and made several hundred dollars in sales.

If the image is good enough then put it up for sale

« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2015, 06:00 »
+2
Ah, the poor cousin to the Art Shot, or so were told.
No effort spent to take it, just point, and click.
Nothing to it really.

And yet, it does its job, uncomplaining. Recording moments in peoples lives. Or something that was important to the person with the camera. Or maybe it was just something you had to be there for.

There are no rules.

The horizons kinda tilted. And the focus is somewhat soft. Maybe the exposures a little light, or maybe its just a little dark

But really, it doesnt really matter. Because the snapshot is the most honest picture youll ever make. No elaborate preparation. No fancy multi-sourced lighting. No makeup artist in the background making sure all the hairs are where they are supposed to be. No props. Heck, not even a fancy location. No creation of a fantasy that never existed in this world.

I like snapshots. They catch all kinds of little things, in the foreground, in the background. Clues that tell a story. Stories that come out of seeing snapshots taken thirty, forty, fifty years ago. Crooked smiles, stiff poses, funny-looking clothes. Whos that lady standing next to Uncle Joe? Boy, were we ever goofy-looking as kids! Hey, I dont remember Grandpa having a dog? Oh man, what a weekend that was when Suzy and Rob came over for the BBQ

You wouldnt get those stories if the photographer actually did what we think photographers should do get rid of the distracting foreground, background, adjust the light just so And wait until everyone but the subject is out of the picture.

Yep. I like snapshots. Theyll never win a prize, but they keep warm the memories. They are not about the camera, or about the photographer. They are about... life.


............................................................
newbielink:http://www.bluehusky.com.au/ [nonactive]

« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2015, 06:36 »
0
In this case it is about making money, not warm memories. But I agree, candid shots are priceless in terms of memories.

« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2015, 07:46 »
+2
Yes, some of my snapshots sell, sometimes better than shots which were set up. They are mostly the snapshots which were shot with stock in mind though. So they need to be decent composition and so on.


 

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