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Author Topic: The stock style  (Read 3234 times)

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« on: July 01, 2009, 22:17 »
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I take a bit of trouble over colour and exposure - use an Expodisk and a meter where appropriate. Most of my rejections are for lighting. On another forum one member claimed to have an acceptance rate of 90%+ on istock, so I checked out his portfolio and couldn't believe how light his images were - typical outdoor shots, not studio.

I had a bunch of resubmits so I opened up in ACR, pushed the brightness slider a fair way to the right, upped the vibrance a good deal, and resubmitted. All accepted. So much for 'well-exposed' imagery. Truth seems to be that successful stock imagery is over-exposed and over-saturated (compared with reality).


« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2009, 22:51 »
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I noticed this a little while back too, metered from grey card and watched the rejections for underexposure :) then looked at what was selling and the style and everything looked overexposed :)

Xalanx

« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2009, 01:31 »
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Truth seems to be that successful stock imagery is over-exposed and over-saturated (compared with reality).

You can correctly expose low key portraits. For high key it's better to overexpose a little, just before blowing highlights.

« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2009, 03:33 »
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I take a bit of trouble over colour and exposure - use an Expodisk and a meter where appropriate. Most of my rejections are for lighting. On another forum one member claimed to have an acceptance rate of 90%+ on istock, so I checked out his portfolio and couldn't believe how light his images were - typical outdoor shots, not studio.

I had a bunch of resubmits so I opened up in ACR, pushed the brightness slider a fair way to the right, upped the vibrance a good deal, and resubmitted. All accepted. So much for 'well-exposed' imagery. Truth seems to be that successful stock imagery is over-exposed and over-saturated (compared with reality).

I agree completely

« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2009, 04:04 »
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For high key it's better to overexpose a little, just before blowing highlights.

With digital cameras that is the correct way to expose anything. And before blowing highlights that means all the channels and numeral values (not just what it looks like for the eye).

« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2009, 09:35 »
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Good observation Avril.  I have noticed the same thing.  Also that contrast seems pushed to the max.   

I am guessing the reason this has developed as the "stock style" is because in order to be successful images have to be eye-catching in a sea of small thumbnails.

Of course the problem becomes how to boost contrast and saturation without introducing artifacts.  Maybe that is the reason for the slight over-exposure?  Fewer shadows to reveal artifacts?

« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2009, 12:20 »
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This really should come as no surprise, stock is not used to sell reality, are all those smiling white teethed perfect skinned well dressed people reality!
Stock is like bright plastic processed over sugared over salted food selling an idealised non existent world!

« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2009, 16:21 »
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Stock is like bright plastic processed over sugared over salted food selling an idealised non existent world!
Nah, I sell varicose veins.   ;D


 

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