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Author Topic: shooting in india  (Read 12985 times)

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Shank_ali

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« on: June 26, 2011, 01:51 »
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Anyone had problems shooting in new delhi.I'm hoping to be staying for 5 days in October/november.I will be shooting the tourist hot spots but also would like to shoot some editorial of the poor which begs the question,no pun intended,will i incur any problems ...


« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2011, 12:28 »
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the general answer is there's no problem throughout India. railroad stations are supposedly off limits, but otherwise it's simple.  - check any of my portfolios for examples of market shots, portraits, temples, etc.

  at any of the major tourist spots you'll have more trouble keeping the locals OUT of your images; and we would sometimes be asked to pose with other Indian tourists for their photos  [we even ended up talking to the provincial governor and appearing on local tv when we were watching a local festival]

the larger question is the ethical one.  i've shot images that show poor people, but i dont shoot slums, garbage or similar. i'm not a photojournalist, so i'm not making a documentary, and i dont shoot any picture that i'd be ashamed to show to the subject of that picture.  in general, whenever a shoot images where one person is the main focus, i try to at least establish eye contact and indicate i'd like to take their picture.  most people dont mind, and if someone says no, i immediately drop my camera.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2011, 12:31 by cascoly »

Shank_ali

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« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2011, 12:38 »
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Thanks Cascoly.I am also hoping to travel down to Jaipur for the day.Train journey looks like 4 hours and read it might be best to hire a car/driver for the day ?

« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2011, 13:24 »
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I was in India in March for about a week, luckily when it was Holi festival, which I have never seen before. I did mostly editorial shots. Very good acceptance rate on the sites for the shots and they are selling reasonably well too, especially on ss. I didn't encounter any problems taking photos of people. Here are some photos from the trip.

http://www.dreamstime.com/india-colldet15760

Shank_ali

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« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2011, 13:59 »
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I was in India in March for about a week, luckily when it was Holi festival, which I have never seen before. I did mostly editorial shots. Very good acceptance rate on the sites for the shots and they are selling reasonably well too, especially on Shutterstock. I didn't encounter any problems taking photos of people. Here are some photos from the trip.

http://www.dreamstime.com/india-colldet15760

Not sure why anyone would throw purple paint over each other but.....Thanks for the link though.
travel plans are going ok.Looks like my journey is going to be..Newcastle/Dubia/New Delhi..15 hours !

« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2011, 14:07 »
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I was in India in March for about a week, luckily when it was Holi festival, which I have never seen before. I did mostly editorial shots. Very good acceptance rate on the sites for the shots and they are selling reasonably well too, especially on Shutterstock. I didn't encounter any problems taking photos of people. Here are some photos from the trip.

http://www.dreamstime.com/india-colldet15760

Not sure why anyone would throw purple paint over each other but.....Thanks for the link though.
travel plans are going ok.Looks like my journey is going to be..Newcastle/Dubia/New Delhi..15 hours !

Great! Well if you haven't flown by Emirates before, get ready to be spoiled.

ShadySue

« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2011, 15:19 »
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I was in India in March for about a week, luckily when it was Holi festival, which I have never seen before. I did mostly editorial shots. Very good acceptance rate on the sites for the shots and they are selling reasonably well too, especially on Shutterstock. I didn't encounter any problems taking photos of people. Here are some photos from the trip.

http://www.dreamstime.com/india-colldet15760

Not sure why anyone would throw purple paint over each other but....

You have a lot of research to do before your trip, then.  ;)

Shank_ali

    This user is banned.
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2011, 16:18 »
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Lots of research Liz.Might even join the Red Cross as a volunteer to help me gain access to some areas that interest me.
After my summer holiday in Devon i shall sit down and book a flight and hotel....

« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2011, 19:27 »
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Personally, just because the person allows you to photograph him, that doesn't give you the right to sell those images, even as RM. I would be very selective regarding how to use these photos.

« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2011, 19:38 »
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Anyone had problems shooting in new delhi.I'm hoping to be staying for 5 days in October/november.I will be shooting the tourist hot spots but also would like to shoot some editorial of the poor which begs the question,no pun intended,will i incur any problems ...

I shot there for a month.  I had problems even though I researched it.  Here's what I found:

1. Guards and such love Polaroids of themselves.  If you can still bring an instant print system you will be able to get into otherwise less accessible areas.

2. Always ask if you can take someone's pic.  I was taking a pic of a lady behind a flower stand and she kept shouting at me in her native tongue and pointing her finger at me.  Then she came after me with her fist and started pounding on me as I curled to protect my equipment and my face.  Police came.  They laughed.  Then educated me on what not to do.

3. Be courteous.

Shank_ali

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« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2011, 00:54 »
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Personally, just because the person allows you to photograph him, that doesn't give you the right to sell those images, even as RM. I would be very selective regarding how to use these photos.
These will be getting sold as editorial..Real people,real situtations....

Shank_ali

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« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2011, 01:00 »
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Mantis,thanks for your post.Some shoot and then ask....
I found shooting editorial in London recently that if you first approach people in a friendly manner they mostly agree to be photographed.However in that situation it's difficult not to get a 'staged'/'posed' shot as the subject is now aware of your presence.
I can also imagine language/communicating will be a problem for me.

« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2011, 01:45 »
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2. Always ask if you can take someone's pic.  I was taking a pic of a lady behind a flower stand and she kept shouting at me in her native tongue and pointing her finger at me.  Then she came after me with her fist and started pounding on me as I curled to protect my equipment and my face.  Police came.  They laughed.  Then educated me on what not to do.

Heck, I don't think I would have half my port. if I always asked and my port is already small enough! I know people have moral issues about not asking, but we are recorded on a daily basis, cctv cameras etc. and I've never been asked if I can be recorded (plus we don't know who is shown this footage). Some of the best pictures I have and top sellers are when I haven't asked. I'm used to being shouted at and able to diffuse the situation, if things get dicey. The image below is of immigration in Singapore, the image wouldn't exist if I had asked. So far 12 downloads on dt and 40 downloads on ss. Shoot fast, smile a lot, if you get caught taking a photo speak to the person, say "Wow, you look great", "I love this country" etc. If ever I'm in any kind of trouble, police, immigration, someone getting angry after I photographed them, praise them, it's virtually the only time I suck up to people, usually the bigger the ego a person has the better it works and if their ego isn't big, they usually don't mind being photographed anyway.

Passenger check at airport" border="0

« Reply #13 on: June 27, 2011, 01:47 »
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Indian is a dreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeam for people shots. They're not all 'oh no my face is precious like gold don't even look at me' like westerners.  A little smile with the eyes, and the head jiggle, and you're away.  Also, there is no truth here, only debate - so if someone tries to stop you there's always a way around it.

If you're lazy just sit down until a crowd gathers in front of you, then snap away on the portraits as much as you want.

One thing's for sure though, more people will take your photo than you theirs.

Indians will charm you : ) they're so generous and light of spirit.

edit: don't take photos of fishwives! they'll beat you up and be foul-mouthed about it too. but i think that's everywhere in the world?

« Reply #14 on: June 27, 2011, 01:54 »
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2. Always ask if you can take someone's pic.  I was taking a pic of a lady behind a flower stand and she kept shouting at me in her native tongue and pointing her finger at me.  Then she came after me with her fist and started pounding on me as I curled to protect my equipment and my face.  Police came.  They laughed.  Then educated me on what not to do.


This doesn't help if you want good editorial shots - it's better if they're not posed.  99.99999% of people won't get angry - and for the tiny percentage who do, it's an opportunity to apologise and make friends.

« Reply #15 on: June 27, 2011, 02:45 »
0
Indian is a dreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeam for people shots. They're not all 'oh no my face is precious like gold don't even look at me' like westerners.  A little smile with the eyes, and the head jiggle, and you're away.  Also, there is no truth here, only debate - so if someone tries to stop you there's always a way around it.

If you're lazy just sit down until a crowd gathers in front of you, then snap away on the portraits as much as you want.

One thing's for sure though, more people will take your photo than you theirs.

Indians will charm you : ) they're so generous and light of spirit.

edit: don't take photos of fishwives! they'll beat you up and be foul-mouthed about it too. but i think that's everywhere in the world?
Haha! I think you just about covered it.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2011, 14:52 by Microstock Posts »

« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2011, 07:23 »
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2. Always ask if you can take someone's pic.  I was taking a pic of a lady behind a flower stand and she kept shouting at me in her native tongue and pointing her finger at me.  Then she came after me with her fist and started pounding on me as I curled to protect my equipment and my face.  Police came.  They laughed.  Then educated me on what not to do.

Heck, I don't think I would have half my port. if I always asked and my port is already small enough! I know people have moral issues about not asking, but we are recorded on a daily basis, cctv cameras etc. and I've never been asked if I can be recorded (plus we don't know who is shown this footage). Some of the best pictures I have and top sellers are when I haven't asked. I'm used to being shouted at and able to diffuse the situation, if things get dicey. The image below is of immigration in Singapore, the image wouldn't exist if I had asked. So far 12 downloads on Dreamstime and 40 downloads on Shutterstock. Shoot fast, smile a lot, if you get caught taking a photo speak to the person, say "Wow, you look great", "I love this country" etc. If ever I'm in any kind of trouble, police, immigration, someone getting angry after I photographed them, praise them, it's virtually the only time I suck up to people, usually the bigger the ego a person has the better it works and if their ego isn't big, they usually don't mind being photographed anyway.

Passenger check at airport" border="0



Yea, it's been awhile.  The police basically said that if someone tells you to stop you should stop.  I too have a pile of people shots I took without asking.  Just was educated on the fact that some people have certain beliefs and dislikes, so it they clearly don't want their picture taken then move on.

« Reply #17 on: June 27, 2011, 09:23 »
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Last week I was on a visa run in Singapore. I met a traveller who showed me his camera equipment, which was all new. He got out one lens and said this is my Varanasi lens. Initially, I thought he said he bought it in Varanasi, but he basically bought it to take photos from afar of the cremations in Varanasi, which is strictly not allowed. I've been to Varanasi and although I've taken photos at the ghats, I didn't attempt to take photos of the cremations. I do like to take photos of people in their natural environment and when they are unaware. I've been doing it since I was 15. I know the limits and if someone clearly doesn't want their picture taken, then all you can do is smile, try to chat etc., if that doesn't work then I think most people have the good sense to move on.

« Reply #18 on: June 27, 2011, 09:56 »
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Thanks Cascoly.I am also hoping to travel down to Jaipur for the day.Train journey looks like 4 hours and read it might be best to hire a car/driver for the day ?


we almost always use a car & driver - first, it's faster than any other public transportation, but more importantly, you have flexibility and you see more.  you dont get any pictures from a train.  good drivers often seek out pictures FOR you - itinerant temple elephants, isoalted shrines, washing day, local festivals, etc

we've done 6 week trips in 2003 and 2009 after several shorter trips.  the major sites are in incredible, but it's the journey that makes india so fascinating

http://hubpages.com/hub/Tips-for-Travel-in-India
http://hubpages.com/hub/Darshan-at-Tirupati-in-South-India

Shank_ali

    This user is banned.
« Reply #19 on: June 27, 2011, 13:22 »
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Getting a Visa is going to be a PITTA imo....

ShadySue

« Reply #20 on: June 27, 2011, 17:06 »
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Getting a Visa is going to be a PITTA imo....
Mine was easy the last time, and I haven't heard anything recently - have you?
Have you been watching the Caroloine Quentin series? I only caught tonight's, the last episode, but interesting 'snippets' of some aspects of Indian life.

Slainte
Liz

« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2011, 18:06 »
0
Getting a Visa is going to be a PITTA imo....

Don't call yourself a photographer, they will want you to get a journalist's visa (double the price) and provide guarantees that you won't take photos. Logic doesn't come into it. Just be a tourist.

« Reply #22 on: June 27, 2011, 18:54 »
0
Getting a Visa is going to be a PITTA imo....

getting a visa is  easy and straightforward - i had mine within a week -- all the info you need is online

Shank_ali

    This user is banned.
« Reply #23 on: June 28, 2011, 01:04 »
0
Getting a Visa is going to be a PITTA imo....
Mine was easy the last time, and I haven't heard anything recently - have you?
Have you been watching the Caroloine Quentin series? I only caught tonight's, the last episode, but interesting 'snippets' of some aspects of Indian life.

Slainte
Liz
Sure did.Very enjoyable !

Shank_ali

    This user is banned.
« Reply #24 on: June 28, 2011, 01:07 »
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Getting a Visa is going to be a PITTA imo....

getting a visa is  easy and straightforward - i had mine within a week -- all the info you need is online
Well i got the impression i apply online/download the application/sign and send two photos/my british passport/money and then need to be seen in person.Sent them an email for clarification.
I am going as a tourist  but a good titp not to mention photography.Thanks


 

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