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Author Topic: shooting in india  (Read 12997 times)

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ShadySue

« Reply #25 on: June 28, 2011, 02:30 »
0
Getting a Visa is going to be a PITTA imo....

getting a visa is  easy and straightforward - i had mine within a week -- all the info you need is online
Well i got the impression i apply online/download the application/sign and send two photos/my british passport/money and then need to be seen in person.Sent them an email for clarification.
I am going as a tourist  but a good titp not to mention photography.Thanks
Make sure you send it whatever the modern equivalent of registered post is (?special delivery?), and that your SAE is also registered. Also do it well in advance. They say four weeks, but you want if possible at least 8 in case things go wrong. Mine came back within a week, but that was a while - too long! - ago.


Shank_ali

    This user is banned.
« Reply #26 on: June 28, 2011, 13:36 »
0
Getting a Visa is going to be a PITTA imo....

getting a visa is  easy and straightforward - i had mine within a week -- all the info you need is online
Well i got the impression i apply online/download the application/sign and send two photos/my british passport/money and then need to be seen in person.Sent them an email for clarification.
I am going as a tourist  but a good titp not to mention photography.Thanks
Make sure you send it whatever the modern equivalent of registered post is (?special delivery?), and that your SAE is also registered. Also do it well in advance. They say four weeks, but you want if possible at least 8 in case things go wrong. Mine came back within a week, but that was a while - too long! - ago.
Well i certainly want it to hand before booking hotel and flight....
Oh and i dont eat curry so whats tasty in india?

« Reply #27 on: June 28, 2011, 14:50 »
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....Oh and i dont eat curry so whats tasty in india?

     :D :D ;D

ShadySue

« Reply #28 on: June 28, 2011, 15:20 »
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....Oh and i dont eat curry so whats tasty in india?

     :D :D ;D

::) ::) ::)
Get ready for the meaner, leaner Shankie.
Whatever, be prepared for Delhi belly; most people get it. Take rehydration sachets and use them if necessary; take imodium, but don't use it unless you get stricken when you need to travel on. It doesn't cure you, just 'plugs' you - it all has to come out, and better sooner than later.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2011, 15:22 by ShadySue »

« Reply #29 on: June 28, 2011, 16:13 »
0

Well i got the impression i apply online/download the application/sign and send two photos/my british passport/money and then need to be seen in person.Sent them an email for clarification.
I am going as a tourist  but a good titp not to mention photography.Thanks

Well i certainly want it to hand before booking hotel and flight....
Oh and i dont eat curry so whats tasty in india?
[/quote]

i didnt have to see anyone in person for my visa

--

to many people curry means curry powder - in fact, curry  covers a wide array of spice mixtures, and indian cuisine is one of the most diverse in the world. 
http://hubpages.com/hub/Best-Recipes-from-Around-the-World

gives some indian recipes i've discovered, and also some dishes we've enjoyed in india

Shank_ali

    This user is banned.
« Reply #30 on: June 28, 2011, 16:20 »
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I shall be careful what i eat.Got a pretty strong stomach.
Been looking through Magnum Agency tonight.Some fine editorial work on show...

ShadySue

« Reply #31 on: June 28, 2011, 17:24 »
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I shall be careful what i eat.Got a pretty strong stomach.
Been looking through Magnum Agency tonight.Some fine editorial work on show...

Now you're really talking. Those are the real, REAL photographers. Wonderful stuff, on the whole.
My favourite is Salgado, but he's not been with Magnum for about 15 years, IIRC.
I got this book.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0714842451/ref=oss_product
Wonderful book, tons to learn. The book is huge and heavy, so is quite difficult to read in bed!

« Reply #32 on: June 28, 2011, 21:57 »
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Oh and i dont eat curry so whats tasty in india?

Tandoori!!!!!!!!!! : )

traveler1116

« Reply #33 on: June 29, 2011, 10:47 »
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Getting a Visa is going to be a PITTA imo....

Don't call yourself a photographer, they will want you to get a journalist's visa (double the price) and provide guarantees that you won't take photos. Logic doesn't come into it. Just be a tourist.

When I applied for mine to China I wrote photographer on the visa form, the lady at the embassy told me to change it to something else and proceeded to white out what I wrote and said I should write "unemployed" since I wasn't working for anyone.  I again wrote photographer for my India visa and they said that it is really bad to have that on the form so I quickly told them China let me change it to unemployed and they agreed it would be better and they whited out photographer so I could write unemployed.  I think it's pretty funny that the world's largest democracy and communist country have both come to the conclusion that a photographer is worse than an unemployed person.  You don't need to write photographer on the form and you shouldn't unless you want to pay a lot more, send in credentials, explain a lot, and wait months for a visa, you aren't a journalist so you won't have any problems.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2011, 10:51 by traveler1116 »

« Reply #34 on: June 29, 2011, 14:29 »
0
Getting a Visa is going to be a PITTA imo....

Don't call yourself a photographer, they will want you to get a journalist's visa (double the price) and provide guarantees that you won't take photos. Logic doesn't come into it. Just be a tourist.

When I applied for mine to China I wrote photographer on the visa form, the lady at the embassy told me to change it to something else and proceeded to white out what I wrote and said I should write "unemployed" since I wasn't working for anyone.  I again wrote photographer for my India visa and they said that it is really bad to have that on the form so I quickly told them China let me change it to unemployed and they agreed it would be better and they whited out photographer so I could write unemployed.  I think it's pretty funny that the world's largest democracy and communist country have both come to the conclusion that a photographer is worse than an unemployed person.  You don't need to write photographer on the form and you shouldn't unless you want to pay a lot more, send in credentials, explain a lot, and wait months for a visa, you aren't a journalist so you won't have any problems.

Depends what kind of visa you're applying for. If it's a tourist visa, definitely don't put dancer, volunteer worker, photographer or anything like that. The indian government will want a letter from your employer guaranteeing you won't be doing those occupations during your stay.

« Reply #35 on: June 29, 2011, 17:13 »
0
I'm curious how you all deal with your camera equipment on these trips. I just can't see myself taking lots of gear, for fear its going to get swiped either during a shoot, or somewhere in between. This is especially the case given I don't see myself spending the money for high end hotels where I know a safe will likely exist. Sure insurance exists, but beyond recovering the cost of lost equipment, this won't salvage trip wasted due to lack of gear. Thoughts?

Even considered going totally minimalist, and investing in a high end point and shoot that can take decent shots when light is decent.

« Reply #36 on: June 29, 2011, 18:31 »
0
I see no issues taking a camera. I never leave it in the hotel, it's always in my backpack. I don't go to places where it would be dangerous to go with a camera. Depending on the place, I just don't use it on my neck all the time, I take it only when photographing.

traveler1116

« Reply #37 on: June 30, 2011, 11:39 »
0
I'm curious how you all deal with your camera equipment on these trips. I just can't see myself taking lots of gear, for fear its going to get swiped either during a shoot, or somewhere in between. This is especially the case given I don't see myself spending the money for high end hotels where I know a safe will likely exist. Sure insurance exists, but beyond recovering the cost of lost equipment, this won't salvage trip wasted due to lack of gear. Thoughts?

Even considered going totally minimalist, and investing in a high end point and shoot that can take decent shots when light is decent.

I just spent 2.5 years going around the world with my 5d and then 5d mark ii,  couple L lenses, flash, laptop, etc.. stayed in hostels ( some as cheap as 2 dollars a night) and never had anything stolen.  Be careful with your gear, stay places that look respectable if you can, use your own lock on lockers, don't let expensive stuff out of your sight on public transport, and use common sense (don't flash expensive cameras around in Lima for instance). 

Shank_ali

    This user is banned.
« Reply #38 on: June 30, 2011, 13:18 »
0
I'm curious how you all deal with your camera equipment on these trips. I just can't see myself taking lots of gear, for fear its going to get swiped either during a shoot, or somewhere in between. This is especially the case given I don't see myself spending the money for high end hotels where I know a safe will likely exist. Sure insurance exists, but beyond recovering the cost of lost equipment, this won't salvage trip wasted due to lack of gear. Thoughts?

Even considered going totally minimalist, and investing in a high end point and shoot that can take decent shots when light is decent.

.
When i'm in India,getting valid concerns by the family on why i should not go !, i shall have one camera,one lense and 51 years expierance of life.I will be just fine.

« Reply #39 on: June 30, 2011, 14:42 »
0
I'm curious how you all deal with your camera equipment on these trips. I just can't see myself taking lots of gear, for fear its going to get swiped either during a shoot, or somewhere in between. This is especially the case given I don't see myself spending the money for high end hotels where I know a safe will likely exist. Sure insurance exists, but beyond recovering the cost of lost equipment, this won't salvage trip wasted due to lack of gear. Thoughts?

Even considered going totally minimalist, and investing in a high end point and shoot that can take decent shots when light is decent.

i do use a high end point & shoot - sony HX1,[ but mostly because it performs best for my sometimes shaky hands], but even with a dslr, try to find a bag that doesnt scream 'big camera'.   i found a black leather male purse that is light enough i take it skiing, and still easy to access.


oterwsie i dont worry a lot - crap happens, but not much you can do beyond taking the usual precautions others have mentioned.  i used to lead hiking trips to nepal, india, china and turkey, and have never had nyone lose their camera.

« Reply #40 on: June 30, 2011, 19:18 »
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I think the biggest risk for a traveler in India is the food! ;D

Shank_ali

    This user is banned.
« Reply #41 on: July 01, 2011, 01:02 »
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I think the biggest risk for a traveler in India is the food! ;D
Buffalo is quite tasty by all accounts.....

ShadySue

« Reply #42 on: July 01, 2011, 05:51 »
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I think the biggest risk for a traveler in India is the food! ;D
Buffalo is quite tasty by all accounts.....
I don't think you've fully grasped the concept of the sacred cow, i.e. beef is relatively difficult to come by.
FWIW, I found the meat tough but tasty, but I like most 'curries'. In Rajasthan the carrots are bright red, but taste exactly like UK carrots.

« Reply #43 on: July 01, 2011, 07:13 »
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I think the biggest risk for a traveler in India is the food! ;D
Buffalo is quite tasty by all accounts.....

Oh buffalo. You know you've got that when the butcher said it was beef when you're still chewing your first mouthful at 3 in the morning.

And mutton is goat, and lamb is goat. Who knows what goat is because i've never seen it on the menu - maybe lamb?

Shank_ali

    This user is banned.
« Reply #44 on: July 01, 2011, 14:25 »
0
I think the biggest risk for a traveler in India is the food! ;D
Buffalo is quite tasty by all accounts.....

Oh buffalo. You know you've got that when the butcher said it was beef when you're still chewing your first mouthful at 3 in the morning.

And mutton is goat, and lamb is goat. Who knows what goat is because i've never seen it on the menu - maybe lamb?
Do they have Tesco's in India ? .Must have a few  McDonalds or Burger King's ?

« Reply #45 on: July 01, 2011, 14:42 »
0
Do they have Tesco's in India ? .Must have a few  McDonalds or Burger King's ?

Are u sure you want to go to India? It would be cheaper and you'd probably have more fun going to your local retail park.  ;D

« Reply #46 on: July 01, 2011, 14:52 »
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I was told that McDonald's in India does not have meat burgers - maybe they use soya protein

« Reply #47 on: July 01, 2011, 14:59 »
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I was told that McDonald's in India does not have meat burgers - maybe they use soya protein


they dont use beef - buffalo is not considered beef, however,  and there's always chicken , fish & pork

india has fantastic fast food -- besides the individual small shops featuring samosas, pakora, et al, there are pushcart vendors with peanuts, fried soy, lentls and other crispy treats, jalupa [like churros but stickier ],barfi

 

http://www.pix-now.com/Food/Markets-around-the-world/
« Last Edit: July 01, 2011, 15:10 by cascoly »

« Reply #48 on: July 01, 2011, 17:19 »
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Shank, I was on the iStock IndiaLypse last year - you might find it helpful to contact the organiser (istock contributor eRomaze) for tips.  He lives in Delhi and is very helpful.  He could probably give you a few suggestions.

As for food, yes they do have MacDonalds, but I've been to India a few times and I'd always recommend going vegetarian, even if you aren't generally.  Their veggie food is the best and available everywhere, and you're less likely to get ill eating it.  The safest food is the food you can see being cooked.

« Reply #49 on: July 01, 2011, 17:50 »
0
Do they have Tesco's in India ? .Must have a few  McDonalds or Burger King's ?

Of the burgers you're probably familiar with, McDonalds only has McChickens and McFilet 'o Fish - the only "non-veg" foods they serve are chicken and fish. I'd steer clear of their Maharaja Big Mac... awful!

I saw Subway but don't remember coming across Burger King.

In general, I'd recommend sticking to Vegetarian food while in India - take imodium even if you have a strong stomach, and maybe even some vitamin and mineral supplements. Don't expect food in India to look like anything that's served in most UK Indian restaurants!

Maybe take a stick along to keep the monkeys off your breakfast! :)


 

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