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Author Topic: What can of post processing in these photos?  (Read 3808 times)

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« on: May 09, 2011, 09:09 »
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Hello, I saw these fantastic photos and I was wondering what wind of post processing he did.
http://www.istockphoto.com/search/lightbox/3291265/#1bd55297 [nofollow]
I mean apart from the long exposure to blur the persons how did he create all the white background around the people?

Thanks


« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2011, 09:22 »
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It looks like the images were just over-exposed in the camera.  Contrast was also probably bumped in post.

« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2011, 09:25 »
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exactly over and over and perhaps a little over exposure :)

grab your camera and go outside and make it 2 or 3 seconds everything is going to be white, magic!!

microstockphoto.co.uk

« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2011, 09:35 »
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no, the sky is actually white in London

(just joking of course, ^ are right - great pictures anyway)

« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2011, 11:11 »
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well right a 2-3 seconds exposure will make everything white but will also burn a large part of the image.
The pictures in Istock are perfect I'm a contributor too I don't think they will ever accept a shot where a so large parte of the image is washed out...

« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2011, 13:23 »
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well right a 2-3 seconds exposure will make everything white but will also burn a large part of the image.
The pictures in Istock are perfect I'm a contributor too I don't think they will ever accept a shot where a so large parte of the image is washed out...

This proves that everything is relative. This photos are great and the overexposed and out of focus areas are intented and add value to the photos.

« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2011, 14:01 »
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well right a 2-3 seconds exposure will make everything white but will also burn a large part of the image.
The pictures in Istock are perfect I'm a contributor too I don't think they will ever accept a shot where a so large parte of the image is washed out...

open one or two of these at IS and you will see faces cut on half! :)

LSD72

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« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2011, 14:23 »
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I am guessing a ND filter would help.

« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2011, 22:40 »
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It could also be a blend of two images....

lagereek

« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2011, 00:28 »
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Over exposure and a bit of cross/processing in some of them.

« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2011, 03:01 »
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well right a 2-3 seconds exposure will make everything white but will also burn a large part of the image.
The pictures in Istock are perfect I'm a contributor too I don't think they will ever accept a shot where a so large parte of the image is washed out...

open one or two of these at IS and you will see faces cut on half! :)

that's probably (or at least mostly) just an effect of a long exposure.  The head will only show where it has been in the same spot for enough time to create some color.. which is probably only half of the head width (if that makes any sense).  If you do a shot with a 5 second exposure, you can walk pretty slowly through the frame and have no record of being in the frame at all.  Walk slower or make it a faster shutter speed and you will be a thin sliver with half a head.

OM

« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2011, 06:57 »
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I am guessing a ND filter would help.

Recently I came across advertising for a super ND filter. Nothing new really, just crossed polarizers which, at max crossed probably offer around 8 stops ND filter. They block a lot of UV light and transmit IR.


 

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