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Author Topic: ADOBE new digital content attribution system might be a true revolution  (Read 2792 times)

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« on: August 04, 2020, 14:20 »
+4
If Adobe gets enough partners to implement this it will be really beneficial on many levels but as content creators for sure it is a welcome feature.
I think this is the most exciting thing created by Adobe in a long time.

https://www.dpreview.com/news/6972974550/adobe-reveals-how-its-cai-digital-content-attribution-system-will-work



« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2020, 15:28 »
0
If Adobe gets enough partners to implement this it will be really beneficial on many levels but as content creators for sure it is a welcome feature.
I think this is the most exciting thing created by Adobe in a long time.

https://www.dpreview.com/news/6972974550/adobe-reveals-how-its-cai-digital-content-attribution-system-will-work

Basically blockchain?

« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2020, 16:48 »
0
Unlike existing blockchains, this would require billions of updates every day. But there's no need for blockchain, instead XMP & schema would be used:

from the dpreview quoting adobe:
Quote
Assertions are cryptographically hashed and their hashes are gathered together into a claim. A claim is a digitally signed data structure that represents a set of assertions along with one or more cryptographic hashes on the data of an asset. The signature ensures the integrity of the claim and makes the system tamper-evident. A claim can be either directly or indirectly embedded into an asset as it moves through the life of the asset.

in English, it records everything done to the image by adding to its metadata.   
Quote
The idea is that at all times during its distribution across the Internet, anyone will be able to view the details about the image's origination, including who created it, what publication originally published the image, when the photo was captured, what modifications may have been made to the image and more
yet since it's encrypted, it can't be changed by viewers.

from the dpreview
Quote
The CAI digital content attribution system will only succeed if major hardware and software companies implement the standard into their products. ..
As well, Adobe's system will have to achieve its highest goal, which is to be tamper-proof, something that is yet to be demonstrated.

A big question for us is whether agencies will use CAI on existing libraries.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2020, 17:38 by cascoly »

« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2020, 12:25 »
0
does it apply to footage as well???

farbled

« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2020, 14:23 »
+5
I am a little leery of Adobe sometimes. Getting all their (on startup) persistence modules off my computers has been almost impossible, and I dont even use any of their software products anymore...

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2020, 08:41 »
+1
I am a little leery of Adobe sometimes. Getting all their (on startup) persistence modules off my computers has been almost impossible, and I dont even use any of their software products anymore...

Have you used the Adobe removal tools? Have you removed all Adobe directories? Go into Regedit and remove the Adobe registry items. iObit uninstaller?

Just some ideas. My personal Adobe product that I'd like to KILL is PDF Architect which I have no use for (that I know) and I keep getting update reminders. I just have other things I'd rather be doing on a day off, like weeding the garden, splitting wood, editing photos and wasting time on MSG.  ;) While I'm boiling eggs and making candles.

farbled

« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2020, 16:54 »
+2
I am a little leery of Adobe sometimes. Getting all their (on startup) persistence modules off my computers has been almost impossible, and I dont even use any of their software products anymore...

Have you used the Adobe removal tools? Have you removed all Adobe directories? Go into Regedit and remove the Adobe registry items. iObit uninstaller?

Just some ideas. My personal Adobe product that I'd like to KILL is PDF Architect which I have no use for (that I know) and I keep getting update reminders. I just have other things I'd rather be doing on a day off, like weeding the garden, splitting wood, editing photos and wasting time on MSG.  ;) While I'm boiling eggs and making candles.

Well, you know how much time I have to devote to this stuff :) . I found a microsoft tool called MS autoruns that first lets me disable everything or anything that runs at startup, plus it gives me the file paths to those directories so that I can remove them or disable them.

Using Win10 on a win7 latop nowadays. Closed out my adobe accounts except for my contributor thingy, and I use a vpn to access that and a separate browser. Bought an Affinity license (one-time deal) and slowly learning that over from Photoshop. Not to say I don't like the actual Adobe products, its just all the baggage that comes with makes me not want to go through all the hassle.

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2020, 09:51 »
0
I am a little leery of Adobe sometimes. Getting all their (on startup) persistence modules off my computers has been almost impossible, and I dont even use any of their software products anymore...

Have you used the Adobe removal tools? Have you removed all Adobe directories? Go into Regedit and remove the Adobe registry items. iObit uninstaller?

Just some ideas. My personal Adobe product that I'd like to KILL is PDF Architect which I have no use for (that I know) and I keep getting update reminders. I just have other things I'd rather be doing on a day off, like weeding the garden, splitting wood, editing photos and wasting time on MSG.  ;) While I'm boiling eggs and making candles.

Well, you know how much time I have to devote to this stuff :) . I found a microsoft tool called MS autoruns that first lets me disable everything or anything that runs at startup, plus it gives me the file paths to those directories so that I can remove them or disable them.

Using Win10 on a win7 latop nowadays. Closed out my adobe accounts except for my contributor thingy, and I use a vpn to access that and a separate browser. Bought an Affinity license (one-time deal) and slowly learning that over from Photoshop. Not to say I don't like the actual Adobe products, its just all the baggage that comes with makes me not want to go through all the hassle.

I still use Elements, just bought 2020 with Premier (WIN10) and I still have good old Illustrator CS3 which was never CC. Lightroom looks really nice for what I do, just never got past version2. Some old software like Autopano Pro won't run on newer systems, I still have an XP laptop and desktop, mostly just for that.

But back to Elements, each version is good on two computers. Older XP systems have E7 running. Newer computers have V10 and the Windows 10 best desktop and newest laptop have Elements 2020.

One of these days I need to figure out if I want PDF creator, and why, if it actually works? And why my computer has PDF Architect on it, if it actually functions? I just get distracted and have other tings to do. Maybe in December.  ;)
« Last Edit: August 16, 2020, 08:55 by Uncle Pete »

« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2020, 10:49 »
+1
the most important topic for stock photographers in last few years went offtopic.

 ;D

farbled

« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2020, 13:35 »
0
For 10 to 30 some odd cents an image, I am not too fussed if Adobe finds a way to go after cheats. We don't see any of that gain anyway from most agencies, remember Getty going after every abuse? We don't see a penny from that.

Its interesting, to be sure and good for them. They are protecting their market share and giving another reason out of many for people to send content to them. But unless its exclusive content, it doesn't make a huge difference does it?

Respectfully, I would disagree its the most important topic for stock producers though.

« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2020, 17:19 »
0
For 10 to 30 some odd cents an image, I am not too fussed if Adobe finds a way to go after cheats. We don't see any of that gain anyway from most agencies, remember Getty going after every abuse? We don't see a penny from that.

Its interesting, to be sure and good for them. They are protecting their market share and giving another reason out of many for people to send content to them. But unless its exclusive content, it doesn't make a huge difference does it?

Respectfully, I would disagree its the most important topic for stock producers though.

You are the owner of your images, only you. If you are adult person you know the rest. You find your contest stolen, you contact the lawyer etc etc. Noone Will work for you. 80+% images online are stolen.

farbled

« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2020, 17:38 »
0
You are the owner of your images, only you. If you are adult person you know the rest. You find your contest stolen, you contact the lawyer etc etc. Noone Will work for you. 80+% images online are stolen.
Ok.
My apologies for sidetracking your thread with my aside about the company's persistence software.

« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2020, 19:11 »
+2
You are the owner of your images, only you. If you are adult person you know the rest. You find your contest stolen, you contact the lawyer etc etc. Noone Will work for you. 80+% images online are stolen.
Ok.
My apologies for sidetracking your thread with my aside about the company's persistence software.

No need to apologise, not my thread but this is very important. It's not just Adobe, other sites will follow too. Soon Google with not show images with stripped copyright informations, wait and see. It's the only light in these dark times for stock photographers.

« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2020, 15:59 »
0
i'm surprised  by the lack of interest, too.  it will add to the security of images - there will still be thieves, but it will also educate honest users and perhaps even penalize some of the 'free' sites

this doesnt look like a market grab by Adobe - it follows a tradition of  companies creating  and releasing new standards; eg BMP from MS, GIF from CompuServe & PDF from Adobe

each of these can be used by anyone without having to pay anything to the creators

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2020, 10:43 »
0
i'm surprised  by the lack of interest, too.  it will add to the security of images - there will still be thieves, but it will also educate honest users and perhaps even penalize some of the 'free' sites

this doesnt look like a market grab by Adobe - it follows a tradition of  companies creating  and releasing new standards; eg BMP from MS, GIF from CompuServe & PDF from Adobe

each of these can be used by anyone without having to pay anything to the creators

Good points. These things didn't get announced one day and implemented the next. I'm happy to have enhanced image security which could discourage commercial use, but will do nothing to alter web misuse. Anyone large enough to be sued, and actually collect damages, is probably already careful and using legally obtained images.

The laws need to change, to make it easier to file a claim. That and an embedded ID system, could work.


« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2020, 03:32 »
0
Thanks for sharing! This looks actually pretty interesting  :)


 

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