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Author Topic: April 2021 Brutally Honest Earnings Report  (Read 5664 times)

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Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« on: April 30, 2021, 09:11 »
+4
It's that time of the month again and welcome back to the April 2021 detailed monthly report during these increasingly strange and desperate times!

https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.com/2021/04/30/april-2021-brutally-honest-earnings-report/



« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2021, 11:52 »
0
Interesting read

To be honest Alamy and Adobe have both knocked that turd shitterstock in to the long grass for months now.

Alamy is always 1st now then Adobe 2nd and shittystock now a dismal 3rd (they used to be far and away 1st above all others) . 

But I stopped seriously uploading to them as of May last year with the odd single substandard image thrown at them every now and then.

« Last Edit: April 30, 2021, 22:03 by Bad Robot »

« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2021, 13:31 »
0
Nice to finally get a good sale at Alamy - those really do make a difference. Sadly they do not come along every month for me.

I usually think of RPI as Return Per Image as opposed to RPD which is Return Per Download. So if I had 1000 images at a site and 10 of them sold netting me 10$ per sale the RPI would be $100/1000 or $0.10 and the RPD would be $100/10 or $10

Horizon

    This user is banned.
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2021, 07:29 »
0
As soon as SS and Adobe take a nose-dive Alamy will change its algorithm to suit everybody they've been doing this for years. Then when SS and Adobe comes up to the surface again Alamy will change it back to suit their editorial members. The little old group that stand for about 80% of turnover!

« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2021, 09:04 »
+1
As soon as SS and Adobe take a nose-dive Alamy will change its algorithm to suit everybody they've been doing this for years. Then when SS and Adobe comes up to the surface again Alamy will change it back to suit their editorial members. The little old group that stand for about 80% of turnover!

Proof of this statement?

Horizon

    This user is banned.
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2021, 09:56 »
0
As soon as SS and Adobe take a nose-dive Alamy will change its algorithm to suit everybody they've been doing this for years. Then when SS and Adobe comes up to the surface again Alamy will change it back to suit their editorial members. The little old group that stand for about 80% of turnover!

Proof of this statement?

Just my own and a few thousand old-timers observation throughout the years......anyway just wait and see for yourself.

« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2021, 13:24 »
+2
As soon as SS and Adobe take a nose-dive Alamy will change its algorithm to suit everybody they've been doing this for years. Then when SS and Adobe comes up to the surface again Alamy will change it back to suit their editorial members. The little old group that stand for about 80% of turnover!

Proof of this statement?

Just my own and a few thousand old-timers observation throughout the years......anyway just wait and see for yourself.

"a few thousand old-timers " sorry but thats just an opinion not a fact

« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2021, 20:18 »
0
Interesting read

To be honest Alamy and Adobe have both knocked that turd shitterstock in to the long grass for months now.

Alamy is always 1st now then Adobe 2nd and shittystock now a dismal 3rd (they used to be far and away 1st above all others) .  ...

as someone said:  Proof of this statement? - or is just your ONE datapoint? alamy barely shows up on the monthly poll

« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2021, 21:28 »
+1
Interesting read

To be honest Alamy and Adobe have both knocked that turd shitterstock in to the long grass for months now.

Alamy is always 1st now then Adobe 2nd and shittystock now a dismal 3rd (they used to be far and away 1st above all others) .  ...

as someone said:  Proof of this statement? - or is just your ONE datapoint? alamy barely shows up on the monthly poll

I know this is hard for you but do try to keep up  ::)

My datapoint is just that a single datapoint unlike the sweeping generalization based on nothing more than supposition.

« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2021, 02:11 »
+2
Interesting read

To be honest Alamy and Adobe have both knocked that turd shitterstock in to the long grass for months now.

Alamy is always 1st now then Adobe 2nd and shittystock now a dismal 3rd (they used to be far and away 1st above all others) .  ...
as someone said:  Proof of this statement? - or is just your ONE datapoint? alamy barely shows up on the monthly poll

I know this is hard for you but do try to keep up  ::)

My datapoint is just that a single datapoint unlike the sweeping generalization based on nothing more than supposition.
  Data or rather a statement from a single user is completely useless though. If you look at SSs published figures which are audited and would land them in deep trouble if they were wrong its clear that despite what people would love to believe they are doing ok. I know its hard for you but wishing it were otherwise is a waste of energy. https://investor.shutterstock.com/news-releases/news-release-details/shutterstock-reports-fourth-quarter-and-full-year-2020-financial

« Reply #10 on: May 02, 2021, 03:29 »
0
I made 34% percent more on Shutterstock in April 2021 than April 2020.

I also had one payment of $27 from Adobe Stock compared to none in April 2020.

« Reply #11 on: May 02, 2021, 04:48 »
0
Interesting read

To be honest Alamy and Adobe have both knocked that turd shitterstock in to the long grass for months now.

Alamy is always 1st now then Adobe 2nd and shittystock now a dismal 3rd (they used to be far and away 1st above all others) .  ...
as someone said:  Proof of this statement? - or is just your ONE datapoint? alamy barely shows up on the monthly poll

I know this is hard for you but do try to keep up  ::)

My datapoint is just that a single datapoint unlike the sweeping generalization based on nothing more than supposition.
  Data or rather a statement from a single user is completely useless though. If you look at SSs published figures which are audited and would land them in deep trouble if they were wrong its clear that despite what people would love to believe they are doing ok. I know its hard for you but wishing it were otherwise is a waste of energy. https://investor.shutterstock.com/news-releases/news-release-details/shutterstock-reports-fourth-quarter-and-full-year-2020-financial

OK for the record "To be honest Alamy and Adobe have both knocked that turd shitterstock in to the long grass for months now.

Alamy is always 1st now then Adobe 2nd and shittystock now a dismal 3rd (they used to be far and away 1st above all others)  FOR ME ONLY"

There is that better?   ::)

bunch of piss takers

« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2021, 06:13 »
+1
I made 78% less on SS in april 2021 than april 2020.
And 30% more on Adobe in april 2021 than april 2020.

« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2021, 19:49 »
+3

My datapoint is just that a single datapoint unlike the sweeping generalization based on nothing more than supposition.

that datapoint is tainted --you forgot about your original statement that:
... I stopped seriously uploading to them as of May last year with the odd single substandard image thrown at them every now and then

hardly a fair comparison when you're not submitting!

« Reply #14 on: May 04, 2021, 07:10 »
+1
To the op :
Your statement: "capturing and submitting editorial photos in a legal mess, but as the risk is very small its not something I would worry about"
Maybe you should have more respect for people in public places (I remember picture of homeless people that you sell without their consent).
Spannish "Aggressive Shepherd-Painter" is agressive but... maybe we can understand his reaction.

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #15 on: May 04, 2021, 10:08 »
+4
I'm always late (compared to Alex), but here are my results for April. Not too good as a trend, and well down on both March and previous Aprils. The lack of large single sales (on SS and Alamy) was the main reason for the drop.


Full details as usual on my blog: https://backyardsilver.com/making-not-as-much-money-from-stock-photography/

Steve

Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2021, 15:10 »
+5
To the op :
Your statement: "capturing and submitting editorial photos in a legal mess, but as the risk is very small its not something I would worry about"
Maybe you should have more respect for people in public places (I remember picture of homeless people that you sell without their consent).
Spannish "Aggressive Shepherd-Painter" is agressive but... maybe we can understand his reaction.

Such a fuss over some photons. Anyway, the general rule of thumb is that consent is not required when shooting in public, but depends on jurisdiction and needs further analysis. UK being the most liberal and photography-friendly. Portugal/Spain/Italy less so.

Homeless people were remunerated accordingly, unless unconscious.

In an alternative reality, the Shepherd would have asked nicely and I would have replied nicely by removing both images, sending him high-resolution copies for his marketing and I would have helped to promote his work. In this reality he can fk off to his pastures.

Photography is not a crime. You should support freedom of the press.


« Reply #17 on: May 07, 2021, 06:46 »
+1
To the op :
Your statement: "capturing and submitting editorial photos in a legal mess, but as the risk is very small its not something I would worry about"
Maybe you should have more respect for people in public places (I remember picture of homeless people that you sell without their consent).
Spannish "Aggressive Shepherd-Painter" is agressive but... maybe we can understand his reaction.

Such a fuss over some photons. Anyway, the general rule of thumb is that consent is not required when shooting in public, but depends on jurisdiction and needs further analysis. UK being the most liberal and photography-friendly. Portugal/Spain/Italy less so.

Homeless people were remunerated accordingly, unless unconscious.

In an alternative reality, the Shepherd would have asked nicely and I would have replied nicely by removing both images, sending him high-resolution copies for his marketing and I would have helped to promote his work. In this reality he can fk off to his pastures.

Photography is not a crime. You should support freedom of the press.

Thank you for a great informative post once again and congrats on your successful month on Alamy. Hope that you will see more of those big sales!
 
The Shepherd case is INTERESTING. Maybe he had several reasons to be furious. Some people do think that having their photo (or photos of their property) taken means trouble of some kind. Can you blame them. Some stranger has images of them and can do whatever with them. Others of course feel at home in front of camera and have 100s of selfies taken daily, but this guy probably didn't belong to the latter group.

A photographer has his or her rights but a person has a right to be left alone. I usually think in situations like this, "what if this would be me?" Do I want somebody to point a camera at me when I walk on the street? NO!
OK, then I will have to give the same privacy to others, too.





« Reply #18 on: May 08, 2021, 05:03 »
0
How can you have stats for April for iStock, when earnings are yet to be published around 20th of May?

Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« Reply #19 on: May 08, 2021, 05:07 »
0
To the op :
Your statement: "capturing and submitting editorial photos in a legal mess, but as the risk is very small its not something I would worry about"
Maybe you should have more respect for people in public places (I remember picture of homeless people that you sell without their consent).
Spannish "Aggressive Shepherd-Painter" is agressive but... maybe we can understand his reaction.

Such a fuss over some photons. Anyway, the general rule of thumb is that consent is not required when shooting in public, but depends on jurisdiction and needs further analysis. UK being the most liberal and photography-friendly. Portugal/Spain/Italy less so.

Homeless people were remunerated accordingly, unless unconscious.

In an alternative reality, the Shepherd would have asked nicely and I would have replied nicely by removing both images, sending him high-resolution copies for his marketing and I would have helped to promote his work. In this reality he can fk off to his pastures.

Photography is not a crime. You should support freedom of the press.

Thank you for a great informative post once again and congrats on your successful month on Alamy. Hope that you will see more of those big sales!
 
The Shepherd case is INTERESTING. Maybe he had several reasons to be furious. Some people do think that having their photo (or photos of their property) taken means trouble of some kind. Can you blame them. Some stranger has images of them and can do whatever with them. Others of course feel at home in front of camera and have 100s of selfies taken daily, but this guy probably didn't belong to the latter group.

A photographer has his or her rights but a person has a right to be left alone. I usually think in situations like this, "what if this would be me?" Do I want somebody to point a camera at me when I walk on the street? NO!
OK, then I will have to give the same privacy to others, too.

Research by CCTV.co.uk concludes that in London there is now 1 CCTV Camera for every 13 people, meaning there are now 691,000 CCTV Cameras in London (2020/21)

Source: https://www.cctv.co.uk/how-many-cctv-cameras-are-there-in-london/
https://www.usnews.com/news/cities/articles/2020-08-14/the-top-10-most-surveilled-cities-in-the-world

Then a civilian someone goes crazy over a tourist capturing a few stills while on holiday! Oh, the irony!

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #20 on: May 08, 2021, 05:45 »
+1
Also remember that in London in particular, and also other cities and towns, many 'public' streets are actually privately owned, where your rights aren't as you might expect. E.g.:
https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/jul/24/revealed-pseudo-public-space-pops-london-investigation-map

"UK Law
On the whole, UK law doesn't prevent photography in public places. The UK has relatively liberal laws regarding photography compared with many countries. Although there are some exceptions, the key principle is that you can photograph people and buildings without needing permission, providing you are in a public place.
As long as you're not causing any harassment, you're allowed to photograph other people if they are in a public place.

Public vs. Private
Many of the incidents in which photographers come into difficulty is that many places which you instinctively think are public are in fact privately controlled. This includes some shopping centres, car parks, some parks and play areas (depending on the attitude of the landowner) and various private structures, for example, Millennium Wheel on the South Bank in London. There is a trend for public places to become private, particularly in town centres which are developed with new shopping centres. "
https://www.blpawards.org/competition/photo-rights

« Reply #21 on: May 08, 2021, 06:58 »
+3
You are just wrong and don't understand how freedom of press works. In public space you have no right to not to be your image being taken by a photographer or a security camera. Those images cannot be published in a commercial way but yes in an editorial way. That means if an article is about a city for example and you are standing in the shot the article has all the right to use the image with or without your authorization. Tha's the law in most democracies. You might like it or not but that's how it works. In North Korea China and Venezuela it might be different do.


A photographer has his or her rights but a person has a right to be left alone. I usually think in situations like this, "what if this would be me?" Do I want somebody to point a camera at me when I walk on the street? NO!
OK, then I will have to give the same privacy to others, too.

« Reply #22 on: May 08, 2021, 08:40 »
+1
Its not that simple. If people or paintings are the main object of the image like Alexanders second image https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.files.wordpress.com/2021/04/salamanca.jpg you are not allowed to sell it or publish it without the permission of the person you are photographing.
Alexandre also publishes on his blog that the artist has given no permission to make a photograph.
In this case i think Alexandre probably will loose lots of money if the angry artist will take this issue to court.
Just my opinion.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2021, 08:43 by ttart »

farbled

« Reply #23 on: May 08, 2021, 10:36 »
0
You are just wrong and don't understand how freedom of press works. In public space you have no right to not to be your image being taken by a photographer or a security camera. Those images cannot be published in a commercial way but yes in an editorial way. That means if an article is about a city for example and you are standing in the shot the article has all the right to use the image with or without your authorization. Tha's the law in most democracies. You might like it or not but that's how it works. In North Korea China and Venezuela it might be different do.


Don't forget Quebec, and certain situations in Canada in your list. As well as many "public" areas in the US that have security implications, like outside of prisons for example. Its not black and white at all.

"...no consent is needed where the person is an anonymous element of the scenery, even if it is technically possible to identify individuals in the photograph."

Its the "anonymous" part that gets tested of course. Canadian law (1998) apparently starts with the default that you can't, and its on the photographer to defend why they can should it go to court. Another example is in London, where many streets are apparently privately owned, and the bylaws can be quite strict.

Its up to the photographer to know the laws where they are shooting. Alex is right that the guy over-reacted, but perhaps he had a prior bad experience? In any event, there's legal, and there's prudent (not saying Alex was not prudent, he came across as respectful in the face of an angry fella). I hope everyone stays safe out there. :)

« Reply #24 on: May 09, 2021, 02:03 »
+3
Just to inform, this is NOT personally directed to Alexandre. I'm speaking generally about shooting strangers in public.

We photographers tend to get so defensive about our legal rights. Relax. It shouldn't ALWAYS be about legal rights. What about common decency, and what's reasonable? The other person you are pointing your camera at is not an anonymous object or a piece of meat. That's a real person with thoughts, feelings and opinions. I don't think it hurts too much to be considerate to other people, when you are shooting. Show some respect. If you are like most photographers, you have an enormous backlog of images to work on. It can't be ALL about that one photo of that one person who doesn't want his/her photo taken.

It's never a bad idea to think of your own reputation. If somebody starts complaining about you, it can be bad for your business. You come across as difficult to work with. Potential clients looking for a freelancer will choose someone else to work with.

"Freedom of press" is a huge exaggeration when it comes to microstock photography. A great deal of editorial micro shots are just a bunch of unreleased images that are not topical and will never be published by any news media. Even a microstock photographer who shoots some newsworthy shots every now and then can't be associated with daily news reporters employed by nationwide or international media. That's a whole different ball game.

You are just wrong and don't understand how freedom of press works. In public space you have no right to not to be your image being taken by a photographer or a security camera. Those images cannot be published in a commercial way but yes in an editorial way. That means if an article is about a city for example and you are standing in the shot the article has all the right to use the image with or without your authorization. Tha's the law in most democracies. You might like it or not but that's how it works. In North Korea China and Venezuela it might be different do.


A photographer has his or her rights but a person has a right to be left alone. I usually think in situations like this, "what if this would be me?" Do I want somebody to point a camera at me when I walk on the street? NO!
OK, then I will have to give the same privacy to others, too.

« Reply #25 on: May 09, 2021, 03:10 »
+1
You are just wrong and don't understand how freedom of press works. In public space you have no right to not to be your image being taken by a photographer or a security camera. Those images cannot be published in a commercial way but yes in an editorial way.

Nope. You cannot generalize this as a rule, because each country has its own laws. I don't know about every country in the world, so I can't make generalized statements for them, but I live and photograph in Germany, so I made sure I read up all paragraphs regarding photography here and I can assure you that, even for editorial usage photos, you are not allowed to photograph and publish (even for editorial usage) people in public space when they are the main subject of the photo.

 You are allowed take and sell photos of people taking part in events of public interest like a demonstration and you are also allowed to take photos of streets, buildings, nature, etc. even when there are people in these photos. But taking a close-up portrait shot of some stranger walking in the street and sell it as editorial on Shuttesrtock is not allowed in Germany. Sadly almost no one cares about these rules, neither the contributors nor the stock agencies. I have seen countless editorial close up shots taken in Germany on Shutterstock, just as I have seen countlesd photos of for example castles where the photos were taken inside the property while taking photos there was not allowed. The problem is that hardly anyone takes the effort to go to a castle's webpage and read the fineprints there, like I always make sure to do.

 I am sure in 99,9% of all cases contributors get away with it, because the chance of the person or the property owner even seeing that photo and then taking the effort to hunt the photographer down and actually sue him is very small. But contributors need to be aware that they are taking a legal risk when they just walk around like madmen taking photos of everyone and everything around them, uploading everything to Shutterstock, without ever actually informing themselves about the legal aspect of the country the photos were taken in.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recht_am_eigenen_Bild_(Deutschland)

Quote
Without the consent required under 22, the following may be disseminated and displayed:

    Portraits from contemporary history
    Pictures in which the people appear only as accessories next to a landscape or other location
    Pictures of meetings and similar events in which the persons depicted have taken part
(...)
There are exceptions for events (demonstrations, general meetings, cultural events, etc.). Participants must expect to be photographed here.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2021, 03:18 by Firn »

« Reply #26 on: May 09, 2021, 10:14 »
0
You are on lawful grounds documenting and photographing someone on public grounds. It does not matter if the subject being photographed likes it or not. It is a right granted to you in most free democracies. Why? Because it helps transparency, freedom of press and because when you are on a public street you are not granted anonymity anymore. Nothing to do with respect or not. It is the way it is the same way as you have the right to not be arrested and maintained in custody by the police without a lawyer even if the police thinks that it detracts to catch the bad guy.
Things work this way in a democracy for a lot of reasons.

And about microstock and freedom of press. It does not matter if you have an official badge from a press organization which I have as I studied and have a degree in journalism in Spain, or if a microstocker or a citizen journalist documents any action on public ground. That freedom protects all.
And the photographer that had problems in Salamanca has all the law on his side and the subject that got angry not, only if the published image is used for "informative" purposes. If that would not be the case then the angry bad educated man might have a case.

Just to inform, this is NOT personally directed to Alexandre. I'm speaking generally about shooting strangers in public.

We photographers tend to get so defensive about our legal rights. Relax. It shouldn't ALWAYS be about legal rights. What about common decency, and what's reasonable? The other person you are pointing your camera at is not an anonymous object or a piece of meat. That's a real person with thoughts, feelings and opinions. I don't think it hurts too much to be considerate to other people, when you are shooting. Show some respect. If you are like most photographers, you have an enormous backlog of images to work on. It can't be ALL about that one photo of that one person who doesn't want his/her photo taken.

It's never a bad idea to think of your own reputation. If somebody starts complaining about you, it can be bad for your business. You come across as difficult to work with. Potential clients looking for a freelancer will choose someone else to work with.

"Freedom of press" is a huge exaggeration when it comes to microstock photography. A great deal of editorial micro shots are just a bunch of unreleased images that are not topical and will never be published by any news media. Even a microstock photographer who shoots some newsworthy shots every now and then can't be associated with daily news reporters employed by nationwide or international media. That's a whole different ball game.

You are just wrong and don't understand how freedom of press works. In public space you have no right to not to be your image being taken by a photographer or a security camera. Those images cannot be published in a commercial way but yes in an editorial way. That means if an article is about a city for example and you are standing in the shot the article has all the right to use the image with or without your authorization. Tha's the law in most democracies. You might like it or not but that's how it works. In North Korea China and Venezuela it might be different do.


A photographer has his or her rights but a person has a right to be left alone. I usually think in situations like this, "what if this would be me?" Do I want somebody to point a camera at me when I walk on the street? NO!
OK, then I will have to give the same privacy to others, too.


farbled

« Reply #27 on: May 09, 2021, 10:22 »
+1
You are on lawful grounds documenting and photographing someone on public grounds. It does not matter if the subject being photographed likes it or not. It is a right granted to you in most free democracies. Why? Because it helps transparency, freedom of press and because when you are on a public street you are not granted anonymity anymore. Nothing to do with respect or not. It is the way it is the same way as you have the right to not be arrested and maintained in custody by the police without a lawyer even if the police thinks that it detracts to catch the bad guy.
Things work this way in a democracy for a lot of reasons.

And about microstock and freedom of press. It does not matter if you have an official badge from a press organization which I have as I studied and have a degree in journalism in Spain, or if a microstocker or a citizen journalist documents any action on public ground. That freedom protects all.
And the photographer that had problems in Salamanca has all the law on his side and the subject that got angry not, only if the published image is used for "informative" purposes. If that would not be the case then the angry bad educated man might have a case.

People are stating what the actual laws are in their countries, but you are saying they are wrong because its not true in yours.

« Reply #28 on: May 09, 2021, 13:14 »
0
Unfortunatelly I don't know the specific law in US Canada or other countries. Surely I know in Spain where the problem happened. But in general terms in most democracies the right to photograph and publish for newsworthy content images taken in public space is granted with some limitation like minors , images that attempt against the honour of a person ( being stabbed by a terrorist for example etc). But images like the ones the photographer has shown, nope no problem. For sure not in Spain and I doubt it in most european countries as well (France might be an exception)


People are stating what the actual laws are in their countries, but you are saying they are wrong because its not true in yours.

« Reply #29 on: May 09, 2021, 13:33 »
0
As far as i recall, In EU you can shoot people in city as long as is for editorial purposes. Same in all countries of EU agreement. I study this matter 10 years ago but things could change a bit. Anyway I did not see a single link in the site going directly to the Spanish law or European Commission site. Being brutally honest....its the minimum.
 
Anyway we don't need consent to do it but ethics is something that feels right, right?

In Spain don't forget to ask permission to take a quick photo of the thief that is robbing your car.  ;)


farbled

« Reply #30 on: May 09, 2021, 13:50 »
0
Unfortunatelly I don't know the specific law in US Canada or other countries. Surely I know in Spain where the problem happened. But in general terms in most democracies the right to photograph and publish for newsworthy content images taken in public space is granted with some limitation like minors , images that attempt against the honour of a person ( being stabbed by a terrorist for example etc). But images like the ones the photographer has shown, nope no problem. For sure not in Spain and I doubt it in most european countries as well (France might be an exception)

Exactly what everyone else has been saying. It's not black and white like you said earlier.

I'm interested in why Venezuela is so restrictive as you mentioned? They don't allow street photography? I didn't know that...

« Reply #31 on: May 09, 2021, 16:01 »
0

I'm interested in why Venezuela is so restrictive as you mentioned? They don't allow street photography? I didn't know that...

I don't think he can prove his allegation.

« Reply #32 on: May 10, 2021, 00:27 »
0
As far as i recall, In EU you can shoot people in city as long as is for editorial purposes. Same in all countries of EU agreement.
Not in Germany.  ::)
Kunsturheberrechtsgesetz 22
https://lxgesetze.de/kug/1-21

« Reply #33 on: May 10, 2021, 02:10 »
0

Not in Germany.  ::)
[/quote]

Yes you can Firn. ::)  Please read article 23 and 24 of the link you shared.

23. Without the consent required according to 22, the following may be disseminated and displayed:
1. Portraits from the realm of contemporary history;
2. Pictures in which the people appear only as accessories next to a landscape or other location;
3. Pictures of meetings, elevators and similar events in which the persons depicted took part;
4. Portraits that are not made to order, provided that the dissemination or exhibition serves a greater interest in art.

24) For purposes of the administration of justice and public safety, portraits may be reproduced, distributed and publicly displayed by the authorities without the consent of the person entitled or the person depicted or their relatives.

Furthermore you still have some more exceptions for photojournalism and medical/science /education. For example I was in R&D project co-finance by EU where we had to take pictures of woman's cervix cancer to improve Colposcopy for medics (not the pap smear). These all exceptions is what you call something as editorial instead of commercial since the purpose of the photo does not relies in the identity of the person. but i am no expert here. For Germany my suggestion is that maybe you should consult this law firm  https://zellerseyfert.com/en/image-law-photo-law.html

« Last Edit: May 10, 2021, 02:25 by Evaristo tenscadisto »

« Reply #34 on: May 10, 2021, 03:13 »
+4
Laws tend not to be black and white....you may have a right to take photographs of people in public places but they also have a right not to be harassed by people coming up to them and poking a lens in their face. The grey area inbetween is why we have lawyers and courts. If someone doesn't want their photo taken and tells you that  then I think its a matter of common decency to respect that.

« Reply #35 on: May 10, 2021, 03:52 »
+2
Laws tend not to be black and white....you may have a right to take photographs of people in public places but they also have a right not to be harassed by people coming up to them and poking a lens in their face. The grey area in between is why we have lawyers and courts. If someone doesn't want their photo taken and tells you that  then I think its a matter of common decency to respect that.

I couldn't agree more with you.

However, in the grey area there are countless photos that go to the world press photo and that do not contain the rights signed by the person photographed. This is the case of war scenarios, among others.

I recall that one of the most celebrated photographs of the last 100 years is Robert Capa's The Falling Soldier during the Spanish Civil War in 1936. Or even Napalm girl, the South Vietnamese-born Canadian woman best known as the nine-year-old child depicted in the Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph. Not to mention The Falling Man of World trade Center taken by Richard Drew.

The photos had no consent. This paddles to the terms of what is "common decency". You will see that have a lot of grey areas too.

« Reply #36 on: May 10, 2021, 05:31 »
0
Laws tend not to be black and white....you may have a right to take photographs of people in public places but they also have a right not to be harassed by people coming up to them and poking a lens in their face. The grey area in between is why we have lawyers and courts. If someone doesn't want their photo taken and tells you that  then I think its a matter of common decency to respect that.

I couldn't agree more with you.

However, in the grey area there are countless photos that go to the world press photo and that do not contain the rights signed by the person photographed. This is the case of war scenarios, among others.

I recall that one of the most celebrated photographs of the last 100 years is Robert Capa's The Falling Soldier during the Spanish Civil War in 1936. Or even Napalm girl, the South Vietnamese-born Canadian woman best known as the nine-year-old child depicted in the Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph. Not to mention The Falling Man of World trade Center taken by Richard Drew.

The photos had no consent. This paddles to the terms of what is "common decency". You will see that have a lot of grey areas too.
Yes its not always simple


ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #37 on: May 10, 2021, 05:34 »
+1
... Or even Napalm girl, the South Vietnamese-born Canadian woman best known as the nine-year-old child depicted in the Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph.
Thank you for reminding me of that powerful image.
It made me find this, which is very interesting reading - information I didn't know before, for example that the photographer took the girl and the other children to a hospital:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoTzlZGY2Mc

« Reply #38 on: May 10, 2021, 07:07 »
+1
Everest, you are missing the whole point.
Even if you have the right to photograph it doesn't mean you have to behave like a jerk.


You are on lawful grounds documenting and photographing someone on public grounds. It does not matter if the subject being photographed likes it or not. It is a right granted to you in most free democracies. Why? Because it helps transparency, freedom of press and because when you are on a public street you are not granted anonymity anymore. Nothing to do with respect or not. It is the way it is the same way as you have the right to not be arrested and maintained in custody by the police without a lawyer even if the police thinks that it detracts to catch the bad guy.
Things work this way in a democracy for a lot of reasons.

And about microstock and freedom of press. It does not matter if you have an official badge from a press organization which I have as I studied and have a degree in journalism in Spain, or if a microstocker or a citizen journalist documents any action on public ground. That freedom protects all.
And the photographer that had problems in Salamanca has all the law on his side and the subject that got angry not, only if the published image is used for "informative" purposes. If that would not be the case then the angry bad educated man might have a case.


« Reply #39 on: May 10, 2021, 08:31 »
+1




Yes you can Firn. ::)  Please read article 23 and 24 of the link you shared.

23. Without the consent required according to 22, the following may be disseminated and displayed:
1. Portraits from the realm of contemporary history;
2. Pictures in which the people appear only as accessories next to a landscape or other location;
3. Pictures of meetings, elevators and similar events in which the persons depicted took part;
4. Portraits that are not made to order, provided that the dissemination or exhibition serves a greater interest in art.

24) For purposes of the administration of justice and public safety, portraits may be reproduced, distributed and publicly displayed by the authorities without the consent of the person entitled or the person depicted or their relatives.

Furthermore you still have some more exceptions for photojournalism and medical/science /education. For example I was in R&D project co-finance by EU where we had to take pictures of woman's cervix cancer to improve Colposcopy for medics (not the pap smear). These all exceptions is what you call something as editorial instead of commercial since the purpose of the photo does not relies in the identity of the person. but i am no expert here. For Germany my suggestion is that maybe you should consult this law firm  https://zellerseyfert.com/en/image-law-photo-law.html

No, you can't. Please read what I wrote above, or what you just wrote yourself.

Your original statement was

Quote
In EU you can shoot people in city as long as is for editorial purposes.
And  that's simply not true. You yourself quoted the few and very specific exceptions that allow you to take photos of people and they are clearly not "shoot people in city as long as it is for editorial purposes". At least one of the photos that even started this conversation, where the street painter is not just someone who happens to be in a shot that Alex wanted to take of a building or street, but where he is clearly the main focus of the photo, would, for example, not be allowed here in Germany.
There are only a few conditions that allow you to take photos of people in a  city and "as long as it is for editorial purpose" is not the condition.

You are just wrong and don't understand how freedom of press works. In public space you have no right to not to be your image being taken by a photographer or a security camera. Those images cannot be published in a commercial way but yes in an editorial way.

Nope. You cannot generalize this as a rule, because each country has its own laws. I don't know about every country in the world, so I can't make generalized statements for them, but I live and photograph in Germany, so I made sure I read up all paragraphs regarding photography here and I can assure you that, even for editorial usage photos, you are not allowed to photograph and publish (even for editorial usage) people in public space when they are the main subject of the photo.

 You are allowed take and sell photos of people taking part in events of public interest like a demonstration and you are also allowed to take photos of streets, buildings, nature, etc. even when there are people in these photos. But taking a close-up portrait shot of some stranger walking in the street and sell it as editorial on Shuttesrtock is not allowed in Germany. Sadly almost no one cares about these rules, neither the contributors nor the stock agencies. I have seen countless editorial close up shots taken in Germany on Shutterstock, just as I have seen countlesd photos of for example castles where the photos were taken inside the property while taking photos there was not allowed. The problem is that hardly anyone takes the effort to go to a castle's webpage and read the fineprints there, like I always make sure to do.

 I am sure in 99,9% of all cases contributors get away with it, because the chance of the person or the property owner even seeing that photo and then taking the effort to hunt the photographer down and actually sue him is very small. But contributors need to be aware that they are taking a legal risk when they just walk around like madmen taking photos of everyone and everything around them, uploading everything to Shutterstock, without ever actually informing themselves about the legal aspect of the country the photos were taken in.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recht_am_eigenen_Bild_(Deutschland)

Quote
Without the consent required under 22, the following may be disseminated and displayed:

    Portraits from contemporary history
    Pictures in which the people appear only as accessories next to a landscape or other location
    Pictures of meetings and similar events in which the persons depicted have taken part
(...)
There are exceptions for events (demonstrations, general meetings, cultural events, etc.). Participants must expect to be photographed here.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2021, 09:31 by Firn »

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #40 on: May 10, 2021, 10:34 »
+1
Even though it's the German version, (quoted below) in the US a street photographer also won, or I should say, defended successfully.

Portraits that are not made to order, provided that the dissemination or exhibition serves a greater interest in art.

Everyone should be able to read this as, open door, anything that's "ART". Of course that doesn't mean you won't be sued or won't lose, just that it's wide open for interpretation. People sell their art...

Freedom of the press extends to everyone, not just the actual publication. I'm in the US, this is US law, but similar to many others.  https://www.aclusocal.org/en/photographers-rights

"When in public spaces where you are lawfully present you have the right to photograph anything that is in plain view."

And for anyone who wants to read and learn, Street Photographers and the law:  https://www.clickinmoms.com/blog/street-photography-and-the-law-7-things-you-need-to-know/

I generally don't do this kind of photography. I've been yelled at for "How can you take a photo of that person..." and I didn't argue, I just said, sorry about that. I could have gone into, public places and how I'm perfectly within the law, but I'm not interested in a confrontation with some angry person who doesn't understand the laws. The simple answer is, when in public, no one has a reasonable expectation of privacy.

There are obviously some great shots and real photos to be captured while walking around and doing street photography. I mean what could be more authentic and real, than observing real life situations? I support anyone who has that as their interest. Personally I like what I do and they probably don't. To each their own!  :)


 

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