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Author Topic: Are there any traveling micorstock photographers?  (Read 8790 times)

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« on: January 06, 2012, 11:36 »
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Hi,
recently i've found on this blog very interesting site of one of the microstocker's - http://www.veoelmundo.com/ .  In this site photographer Holger writes about how he visits many different countries of the world and during these journeys he makes photos for microstock.
I think this kind of job - traveling photographer sounds absolutely awsome. Are there any other travelling microstockers? I've heard that travel photos are very succesful in microstock, but can this kind of bussiness payback - i mean  all travelling expenses should be huge - plane, train tickets, hotels or hostels, food, etc. Is it possible for those photos made during these travels to earn enough to compensate all those expenses?  Of course, i realize that it strongly depends from the skills of the photographer and from what countries are visited... But anyway, if You do this it would be interesting to hear something from Your experience. 


« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2012, 11:41 »
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I've heard that travel photos are very succesful in microstock,

I wouldn't say that "travel" photos are very successful, but good "location" photos might be.  ie., it may not be worth the expense to travel to England, say, when there are thousands of snappers living there who already have the entire island documented in stock.  Same as anywhere else.  There's likely someone who lives there that can take all the time they want to shoot good images, instead of your 1-2 days passing through.

« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2012, 11:48 »
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I shoot when I travel, but I'm not a traveling photographer.  Some of the best travel photographers don't actually travel...they just extensively document the areas where they live.  They have the advantage of knowing interesting local places beyond all the tourist traps.

« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2012, 11:49 »
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I do this and have had a trip or two that paid for themselves (usually from one or two shots that really took off), but several that so far have not. I would echo Sean's thoughts that a stocker that already lives there and can shoot in any season, time of day, etc has an infinitely better chance of getting the best selling shots of that location than you do from your quick tour. Still doesn't stop me from trying though.  :)

rubyroo

« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2012, 11:52 »
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Holger drops into this forum a lot (sometimes by parachute), so you can catch up with him here too.  (He goes by the name of Holgs in here).

« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2012, 12:00 »
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Travel photography is probably the hardest niche to make pay in microstock and, like most other niches, it is getting harder every day due to the number of competing images. You are also hugely at the mercy of the weather and other conditions outside of your control so, no matter how good a photographer you might be, an expensive trip can be an economic disaster.

I used to reckon on a 1-2 year payback for a trip and that's when things go reasonably well. I've had some trips that were almost a complete washout and won't payback in 50 years. There are much easier, less risky and more reliable means of paying for your travel trips with your camera __ before you go whilst you're still at home.

traveler1116

« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2012, 12:01 »
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I've done something like Holger and met him a couple times.  My trip was much shorter though, just 26 months.  If you are good, work hard, and travel very cheaply you might break even.  Like Sean said a short trip to England will probably not net you very much since there are a million people covering those areas already.  

ShadySue

« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2012, 12:21 »
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I've heard that travel photos are very succesful in microstock,

I wouldn't say that "travel" photos are very successful, but good "location" photos might be.  ie., it may not be worth the expense to travel to England, say, when there are thousands of snappers living there who already have the entire island documented in stock.  Same as anywhere else.  There's likely someone who lives there that can take all the time they want to shoot good images, instead of your 1-2 days passing through.
POI: 'England" is NOT an island.  :D

rubyroo

« Reply #8 on: January 06, 2012, 12:37 »
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Oh I don't know... depends if you see 'island' as a state of mind  :D

« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2012, 12:44 »
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yeah, right. I suppose you also think the Atlantic ocean isn't a pond :)

ShadySue

« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2012, 13:05 »
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yeah, right. I suppose you also think the Atlantic ocean isn't a pond :)

Huh?

WarrenPrice

« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2012, 13:14 »
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A different approach to travel photography.  Your expenses become tax deductions; camper/RV is business equipment.  Maybe not make a lot of money but lose less money.   :P

« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2012, 13:14 »
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Oh I don't know... depends if you see 'island' as a state of mind  :D

Lol! Nice one. :D

« Reply #13 on: January 06, 2012, 13:16 »
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You really don't want to get a Scot going on the subject of the English - what are you all thinking? :) Or perhaps the many centuries of politics and fighting in the British Isles are not well known elsewhere? I think Liz was gently pointing out the the island is England, Scotland and Wales, currently all part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

« Reply #14 on: January 06, 2012, 13:20 »
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I think that taking some pics while traveling to sell might be worthwhile, but unless you really work at it and pick your travel locations very carefully and travel very cheaply it would be hard to actually make much money at it. - With some effort it is pretty easy to travel amazingly cheaply around much of the world though, and if you really are taking pics to sell you could deduct most of your expenses. If you just want to make $, there are easier ways to do it with a camera I think.

I am sure that for some of my travels I have come out ahead with photo sales - others not (often just a few images that have taken off). However the truth is I would likely be traveling anyway, so if I can take a few hours or days here and there for photography and come out even or ahead that is a good thing. Sometimes I need a break from traveling anyway and sitting in front of a computer processing pics isn't a bad way to take it. Also it can give you a good excuse to get up early or head out to a specific spot. Certainly some of the times I have pulled off on the side of the road to take some images have been well worth it and others not.

Hopefully as I get more of my stuff up on Alamy, especially the non model released stuff I can start to get a better return on some locations.

« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2012, 13:32 »
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Holgs is on the boards here pretty often.  I've let him know about this thread.  He can probably give you some good answers.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2012, 13:36 by leaf »

« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2012, 13:59 »
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You really don't want to get a Scot going on the subject of the English - what are you all thinking? :) Or perhaps the many centuries of politics and fighting in the British Isles are not well known elsewhere? I think Liz was gently pointing out the the island is England, Scotland and Wales, currently all part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Yeah, yeah, I know.  I was just typing fast.  I thought about it afterward, but didn't have the energy to change it... :)

I should have just put "The Land of Harry Potter".


rubyroo

« Reply #17 on: January 06, 2012, 14:36 »
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Lol! Nice one. :D

Thanks muchly  ;D

@ Sean.  "Land of Harry Potter"   :D

ShadySue

« Reply #18 on: January 06, 2012, 15:08 »
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If you just want to make $, there are easier ways to do it with a camera I think.
Probably, but not as interesting or as much fun.

« Reply #19 on: January 06, 2012, 15:23 »
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If you just want to make $, there are easier ways to do it with a camera I think.
Probably, but not as interesting or as much fun.

That's because you're not doing it for a living. Trust me, when you have bills to pay ... and are clocking up expenses on a daily basis ... and getting next to nothing in return due to lousy weather, etc ... it ain't much fun.

That's when you curse your decision to be where you are knowing you could be making good money back home.

ShadySue

« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2012, 15:35 »
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If you just want to make $, there are easier ways to do it with a camera I think.
Probably, but not as interesting or as much fun.

That's because you're not doing it for a living. Trust me, when you have bills to pay ... and are clocking up expenses on a daily basis ... and getting next to nothing in return due to lousy weather, etc ... it ain't much fun.

That's when you curse your decision to be where you are knowing you could be making good money back home.

Not even 2011 being the wettest Scottish year on record has made me regret leaving the well-paying day job, though it made me end the year short of my uploading targets for both iStock and Alamy, and I have nothing to process at the moment.

Even though I will NEVER forget that iStock changed the groundrules 5 days after I handed in my notice.  >:(
« Last Edit: January 06, 2012, 15:44 by ShadySue »

microstockphoto.co.uk

« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2012, 15:40 »
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Agree. Some travels are a disaster from a purely financial point of view (weather has a large part in it) but I never regret travelling, and I'd travel anyway with or without microstock. What's money for? For staying at home making more money? Not for me

« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2012, 16:08 »
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Not even 2011 being the wettest Scottish year on record has made me regret leaving the well-paying day job, though it made me end the year short of my uploading targets for both iStock and Alamy, and I have nothing to process at the moment.

Even though I will NEVER forget that iStock changed the groundrules 5 days after I handed in my notice.  >:(

My 2007 Scotland trip was the one that paid off the best. Was over there in 2005 also and that one didn't do bad either. I envy you being a full-time stocker in such a great place!

« Reply #23 on: January 06, 2012, 17:13 »
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It'd never work, move along.

RacePhoto

« Reply #24 on: January 06, 2012, 17:30 »
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A different approach to travel photography.  Your expenses become tax deductions; camper/RV is business equipment.  Maybe not make a lot of money but lose less money.   :P

Wow I'm learning things, England isn't and island, it's the "land of Harry Potter". And if someone wants to say that the UK is an island, lets quibble, it's a whole mass of islands!  ;)

As for deductions, I've run some of those past my accountant and she says, "Anything that can be used for some other purpose, isn't a business expense" She was talking about clothes that I must buy to work at the races. Yeah, I'll be wearing that fireproof jumpsuit out for  a football game or party some day soon?

Although I have managed to have photography as a business, so the cameras and lenses and... are all business and being depreciated.

Some things like computers and cameras and who knows, a fax machine, DSL at the office, or desk. Are business, even if you might use them incidentally for something personal. Some things that appear to be only business aren't just because the IRS says, you may wear it someplace else, it's not only used for work income. (I'd disagree but I also don't kick hornets nests...)

So here's why I'm nagging you Warren, motor home? If you kept records of the trip, start miles and expenses along the "photo shoot" I'd think you have no problem. If you list the motor home as a business vehicle and try to take 100%, there might be a visit from the auditors. When I go out of state for a race, I keep a detailed log. Starting miles, expenses, food, lodging, all that detailed information. Then I staple it together and forget about it. If I ever get audited again, I'll have a little cushion. Had my business miles disallowed years ago and it cost me thousands. They said "bad records", I was unhappy, but they were right.

I didn't know Holgs did travel. (I must be asleep) It does sound like nice work if you can get it. I want to see the National Parks, just because I never have. Lets see, people have been shooting those since before they had that name. I think the subject is well covered?

I agree with everyone who pointed out, that going someplace, you are at a disadvantage to the locals who can really do some in depth coverage if they want. What I find funny, is that I still "go places" to shoot and I could probably walk to ten nice sites and shoot? So I can't assume that locals aren't just like us and want to find the adventure of being someplace else.

Heck look at Orkney and the archaeology. Or maybe Easter Island. There's probably enough work on the stock sites to fill the buyers needs. Doesn't mean I can't go there and see them? Sales would be nice, but at 12 million images on SS and 25 million on Alamy, I think it's getting more difficult to find something truly unique.

I think there's a guy from the UK, on Alamy, who has 100,000 images, some amazing number, and he just goes out for walks and rides around where he lives. I guess that works for him?

Ah yes there is the Big Pond (across the Pond) and then the one I live on, is the little pond. You would know it as Lake Michigan. 100 miles wide, 300 miles long, what else would you want to call it?

I travel, why I was all the way to Hastings MN for a waterfall I wanted to shoot, last year and Valerie came with me. She said she'd never been to Minnesota before. We go to all those romantic and exotic places, right? LOL I think she hadn't been to Iowa until we went there between Grant's home (in Galena, IL) and Effigy Monument near McGregor. That's me, Mr. Excitement. Well it beats watching paint dry or changing the litter box?

As in: Ignore that little man behind the curtain, there's nothing there? ;)

It'd never work, move along.

 
« Last Edit: January 10, 2012, 02:21 by RacePhoto »

« Reply #25 on: January 06, 2012, 18:13 »
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I've done a fair bit of travel myself in the past 15 years, over 50 countries. Everything from backpacking to commissioned photography. Commissions pay WAY better. Pure travel stock is a bit hit & miss and you'd better be doing it budget-level in order to make it worthwhile your time & effort:

Let's say 1 month of travel in Europe is around 1200 Dollars (Italy / France): Busses, trains, hostels, food, maybe a beer now & then, entrance fees,... Also: Do you give up everything back home (longterm travel), or do you keep your flat (if you only go for 1-2 months).

On top of this: What hourly rate do you charge yourself? As with every business plan, start from the back: How much money do you need a month? (pension scheme, insurances, tax,...) Then divide it by the amount of time you're willing to put in.
Of course, whilst traveling you might only need those $1000 a month. But in the meantime, your friends back home are actually saving money & paying into their pension scheme. And they're sleeping in their own bed, have their own kitchen & don't have to put up with snoring room-mates and dirty dishes.

Just out of curiosity, I did a quick search for "travel Laos" on iStock. Bestselling image sold >100 times in 5 years. Not really that much, considering the low licensing fees in Microstock.
Personally I think Alamy is the better place for travel. But maybe that's just me.

ShadySue

« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2012, 18:30 »
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Just out of curiosity, I did a quick search for "travel Laos" on iStock. Bestselling image sold >100 times in 5 years. Not really that much, considering the low licensing fees in Microstock.
Ha, I was going to point out that you're only supposed to keyword 'travel' on iStock if the photo actually shows someone travelling, but I see that the top pic you referenced shows someone 'actually travelling'.

It is true that some locations sell better than others.

Alamy is in many, many ways much preferable, if only they'd sell more of my pics  ;), but it's hard to find somewhere that hasn't been photographed to death over there.


« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2012, 19:18 »
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Holgs is on the boards here pretty often.  I've let him know about this thread.  He can probably give you some good answers.


Probably in here too often... !

In answer to what I think was the main question - yes there's other traveling microstockers - quite a few pop up from time to time here, and some of them far more successful in terms of revenue than I am. For the most part though I think most of those who shoot a lot of travel would agree that its in the bottom half of the microstock categories for return from images, and that over time that's getting worse not better. Its the sort of thing you do because you love it, not because it pays well.  

There's lots more microstockers who travel frequently, but don't shoot travel imagery. If you're looking at it from a business perspective, its a far more sensible way of doing things.

The difference between what I'm doing and what most people think of with travel is that I normally don't go home. My lifestyle is more nomadic than most people would be comfortable with. I'm back in Australia at the moment, but in the last 5 years I've spent a total of about 3 months in the country. I still call Australia "home", but the reality is I don't actually have a place here - when I go back its really to see family. The main reason I'm traveling isn't that travel photography is particularly lucrative, its that I still like traveling, and I still enjoy photography.

Doing it this way means that my travel expenses are much lower than those who go back and forth. I don't have a car, mortgage, phone internet etc. to pay for back at home, so there's no reason why I can't travel slower, spend extra time in places and actually make sure I get shots that will sell. Airfares are expensive, but then I've also had long periods where I didn't fly at all.

When I started doing microstock, it was more of a way of keeping occupied with something that could generate income than with the thought of it becoming a full-time activity. At that time, I'd quit my job, so spent more time doing microstock and photography than almost anything else, but I didn't really need the income to get by from day to day - I had funds for at least 2 years of travel and didn't have any expenses back at home that I had to cover. It was also a time when downloads seemed easier to come by, and when you were adding photos it was to a much smaller database of images with less competition.

A different approach to travel photography.  Your expenses become tax deductions; camper/RV is business equipment.  Maybe not make a lot of money but lose less money.   :P


Funnily enough when I first started microstock the reason I was looking for a way of earning income was to find a way of writing off having spent way too much on camera gear from my tax bill - the tax deduction didn't work out, but the result was a complete change in what I was doing with my life!

I've done something like Holger and met him a couple times.  My trip was much shorter though, just 26 months.  If you are good, work hard, and travel very cheaply you might break even.  Like Sean said a short trip to England will probably not net you very much since there are a million people covering those areas already.  


Especially true if there's dozens of other microstockers taking the same trip to England at the same time!

I think the big unknown that a lot of people want an answer for is whether its possible to start now and travel from microstock. Of course its still possible, but its also now much harder than it was. The increase in competition and reduced royalties in many places make it harder to build up a portfolio in the critical time when your savings are disappearing. I think Graham's advice is pretty spot on: If you are good, work hard, and travel very cheaply you might break even.

« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2012, 19:31 »
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I've done a fair bit of travel myself in the past 15 years, over 50 countries. Everything from backpacking to commissioned photography. Commissions pay WAY better. Pure travel stock is a bit hit & miss and you'd better be doing it budget-level in order to make it worthwhile your time & effort:

Let's say 1 month of travel in Europe is around 1200 Dollars (Italy / France): Busses, trains, hostels, food, maybe a beer now & then, entrance fees,... Also: Do you give up everything back home (longterm travel), or do you keep your flat (if you only go for 1-2 months).

On top of this: What hourly rate do you charge yourself? As with every business plan, start from the back: How much money do you need a month? (pension scheme, insurances, tax,...) Then divide it by the amount of time you're willing to put in.
Of course, whilst traveling you might only need those $1000 a month. But in the meantime, your friends back home are actually saving money & paying into their pension scheme. And they're sleeping in their own bed, have their own kitchen & don't have to put up with snoring room-mates and dirty dishes.

Just out of curiosity, I did a quick search for "travel Laos" on iStock. Bestselling image sold >100 times in 5 years. Not really that much, considering the low licensing fees in Microstock.
Personally I think Alamy is the better place for travel. But maybe that's just me.

All good points, except the part about $1200 for Europe - I travel fairly cheaply at times, but that sort of budget is borderline for travel in SE Asia, but I'd hate to think of the lengths you'd have to go to to survive on this traveling in France or Italy!

« Reply #29 on: January 06, 2012, 20:39 »
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Ha, I was going to point out that you're only supposed to keyword 'travel' on iStock if the photo actually shows someone travelling, but I see that the top pic you referenced shows someone 'actually travelling'.

That's the beauty of Alamy: liberal keywording. And I do thinkn that "travel" should be the keyword also for landmarks. Why? Because I think many image editors / researchers for travel magazines (or travel sections in newspapers) will use "travel" as a search term, in order to bypass non-travel related images. After all, "travel photography" is kind of its own genre (or at least niche).

« Reply #30 on: January 06, 2012, 21:14 »
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Well,
I'm French and i'm traveling often in SE Asia, you can travel one month in asia for 1000, in France you must count about three times more.
Actually i'm in Thailand, for microstock, some area worth the effort if you have weather chance. I'm meeting some local people and ask them to be model too, but these pictures are not really selling very well, many people like to travel in SE Asia, but they don't care of Asian People in pictures...
You have to spend more money for luxurious hotel with pool if you want good sellers pictures, but that's not my way of travel and i hate luxurious places, i prefer local traditional ones. ;D
I think the best is to shoot what you like, i'm not earning many money from my travel pictures, but some are selling as extended licenses. I'm sending also many pictures to Alamy but i don't understand why i'm selling almost only Rf pictures!!
« Last Edit: January 06, 2012, 21:17 by Smithore »

« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2012, 22:21 »
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I love travelling and submit travel photos which go a little way to offsetting the costs but I'd be hard pressed to turn a profit in under 2 years. These trips are not intended to make money, I'm going anyway.

I can see microstock as a great way to extend travelling opportunity. eg build a portfolio of 2000 photos. Set off into the blue yonder and submit as you go. When you run out of money return to reality and come home. The more time you spent in Asia and the less flights you take the longer you could go for.

I wish I'd had a DSLR when I did my round the world trip a decade ago, I have thousands of photos taken on Kodak Max 400 print film.

Some of my better sellers are travel style photos but taken locally. As pointed out in previous posts locally you have the advantage of knowing the best time/light, locations etc.   

Of course you could use Dreamstimes geotag feature to save yourself some time coming up with your own inspiration.  ;)   

antistock

« Reply #32 on: January 07, 2012, 02:38 »
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Just out of curiosity, I did a quick search for "travel Laos" on iStock. Bestselling image sold >100 times in 5 years. Not really that much, considering the low licensing fees in Microstock.
Personally I think Alamy is the better place for travel. But maybe that's just me.

most of my sales for South East Asia are about Thailand.
Laos .. never made a sale so far, Vietnam just a few, Cambodia good, Malaysia good (mostly Petronas Towers and KL),
Singapore good, Myanmar zero.

it's a shame some countries are completely off the buyers' radar, myanmar is beautiful for instance but had no luck so far.
Laos too, and it's strange considering now the tourism is booming there especially in Luang Prabang.
 
i wouldn't bet making a living out of stock travel in expensive areas like europe or UK !
in most of the SE asia instead you can live OK with 20-30$/day and i've met a few rough guys living well below 20$/day !

said that, Thailand is still king for stock sales which is sad as the neighboring countries are so much better.

antistock

« Reply #33 on: January 07, 2012, 02:49 »
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All good points, except the part about $1200 for Europe - I travel fairly cheaply at times, but that sort of budget is borderline for travel in SE Asia, but I'd hate to think of the lengths you'd have to go to to survive on this traveling in France or Italy!

1200 euro in western europe in impossible nowadays, even the roughest hostels cost 20 euro/night without breakfast.
the cheapest fast food meal will be another 5-6 euros, cigarettes 4-5 euro, tram/bus/metro 1-2 euro...

last year on the other side i did 1 month in vietnam with a full inclusive budget of around 900 euro (no airplanes)
and if i wanted i could have saved a lot more but i'm getting old :)

« Reply #34 on: January 07, 2012, 03:50 »
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I'm off to Laos and Vietnam for 1 month at Easter. Can't wait. Its been more than 10 years since I was there last, I imagine alot has changed but also alot won't have.

I still remember the ride down the mekong in that "speed boat" to Luang Prabang. Boxed up sitting in a tiny spot between two planks of wood, a small car engine attached to propella shaft with no muffler for 8 hours.

microstockphoto.co.uk

« Reply #35 on: January 07, 2012, 04:07 »
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Europe is not all the same.

Accommodation is expensive in UK, very expensive in Italy, a bit less expensive in Germany.

Train and bus fares can be very expensive in UK if not bought in advance, but it you plan everything you save a lot (up to 70% less); of course you have to choose *exactly* the time of travel and try not to lose your bus, so a nomadic style is out of question here.

Flights with low-cost companies are quite cheap in Europe. Which is absurd, because up to a few hundred miles train should be the choice. But that's the way it is.

And regarding sales... from my experience major cities (London, Berlin) sell a lot soon but sales rapidly fall due to competition. "Minor" cities - not necessarily small - such as Glasgow, Coventry, Birmingham, Duesseldorf, Koeln don't sell much but will sell for a longer time.

In the end, I think I can recoup a 500 one week travel in any European country in about 2 years with a few hundred usable pictures. It used to be just 6 months when I started in 2007. 500 includes everything (accommodation, travel, food&drink).
I wouldn't call it "very successful" - as the OP - but still acceptable, especially since I would travel anyway.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2012, 04:10 by microstockphoto.co.uk »

« Reply #36 on: January 07, 2012, 05:25 »
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In the end, I think I can recoup a 500 one week travel in any European country in about 2 years with a few hundred usable pictures. It used to be just 6 months when I started in 2007. 500 includes everything (accommodation, travel, food&drink).
What do you mean by recoup? Just the 500, or also putting into the equation your own time (i.e. 7 days travel at xx/h + 1 day retouching & keywording). Following the equation time = money.
IMHO, travel photography (whilst it's good fun) is NOT the "dream job" that many people think it is. And it's hard work, with lots of walking. Working as a waiter you may be on your feet the same amount of time but earn way better money.

Especially since I would travel anyway.
Exactly That's what it is about. You gotta love it. And it's particularly fun when you're young & don't have a family/house/insurances back home.


antistock

« Reply #37 on: January 07, 2012, 07:44 »
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Europe is not all the same.

Accommodation is expensive in UK, very expensive in Italy, a bit less expensive in Germany.



what about Norway ? hostels in Oslo range from 30 to 50 euro/night in shared-room(dormitory) !

http://www.hostelworld.com/search?search_keywords=Oslo%2C+Norway&country=Norway&city=Oslo

70$ for a sh-itty dormitory room ??
with the same price in SE asia you get a nice hotel room with a hooker ! :)

antistock

« Reply #38 on: January 07, 2012, 07:47 »
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Flights with low-cost companies are quite cheap in Europe. Which is absurd, because up to a few hundred miles train should be the choice. But that's the way it is.

they look cheap but how much will you spend to/from the airport ? that's the typical ripoff ...

besides, the beauty of europe is precisely to see it from the train.

now trains are expensive and no smoking, there's no much fun like in the past apart on night-trains.

antistock

« Reply #39 on: January 07, 2012, 07:58 »
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IMHO, travel photography (whilst it's good fun) is NOT the "dream job" that many people think it is. And it's hard work, with lots of walking. Working as a waiter you may be on your feet the same amount of time but earn way better money.

all my friends who tried to come out with me for one day soon gave up !
and we only did a 3-4 hours urban shooting session on foot in a crowded third world capital.
yes you need to be physically fit and mentally alert.

on top of this their photos were mediocre.

how can somebody think it's a dream job ? it's fun for a while and you need to be crazy and nomadic.
and indeed even a waiter or a mcdonalds clerk is gonna make more money than you until you grow a large portfolio.

« Reply #40 on: January 07, 2012, 09:59 »
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what about Norway ? hostels in Oslo range from 30 to 50 euro/night in shared-room(dormitory) !

With a hostel, don't you lose an arm or two and get a drill through the head?

microstockphoto.co.uk

« Reply #41 on: January 07, 2012, 10:01 »
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What do you mean by recoup? Just the 500, or also putting into the equation your own time (i.e. 7 days travel at xx/h + 1 day retouching & keywording). Following the equation time = money.

Just the 500 honestly, but I try to put a lot of other things into the equation to make it worth travelling - e.g. going to live gigs, visiting art galleries and modern architecture (architect is my other job), going out with girl friends, drinking beer, .... It's time well spent imo. We're all gonna die sooner or later, and at that point the equation time = money will mean nothing. All the rest will mean nothing as well, but at least I had fun.

Especially since I would travel anyway.

Exactly That's what it is about. You gotta love it. And it's particularly fun when you're young & don't have a family/house/insurances back home.


Indeed - except I am not so sure about the "young" part, being almost 40.


Flights with low-cost companies are quite cheap in Europe. Which is absurd, because up to a few hundred miles train should be the choice. But that's the way it is.

they look cheap but how much will you spend to/from the airport ? that's the typical ripoff ...

besides, the beauty of europe is precisely to see it from the train.

now trains are expensive and no smoking, there's no much fun like in the past apart on night-trains.

The cost (and boring time) spent to/from the airport is a ripoff indeed; but sometimes you can find an unexpected deal such as the 2.50 EasyJet bus from Stansted to London (instead of usual 10-15 with other buses or train)
« Last Edit: January 07, 2012, 10:26 by microstockphoto.co.uk »

« Reply #42 on: January 07, 2012, 10:35 »
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Well, reading all these answers i was a little bit surprised, that travel photos aren't very popular. Maybe there could be a good idea to take photos of famous buildings and other objects and then in Photoshop make it isolated objects. Like this:
http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-78671p1.html#id=85458973
I think this type of photos should be quite popular in microstocks and could help earn a little bit more money from travel photos.
I guess after all we could conclude that travel photos won't make big money. But it can compensate at least part of travel expenses. And this is very good thing.
Personally i am interested in travel photo not because i expect to get rich from it - it's just that i'm already bored of spending most of my time near computer (i work with computer graphics, vector illustrations). And traveling a little bit with photo camera would be a good and interesting experience ;)

« Reply #43 on: January 07, 2012, 10:39 »
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...and get a drill through the head?

Most of the time you do get a drill through the head. It usually comes around 2-3am, in form of snoring room-mates who just came home from partying. Ear plugs don't usually help either.

« Reply #44 on: January 07, 2012, 10:49 »
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We're all gonna die sooner or later, and at that point the equation time = money will mean nothing. All the rest will mean nothing as well, but at least I had fun.
I agree. Downside being: if you look at demographic statistics you'll see that today's 30-40 year old generation will have to put money aside in order to have an OK pension time. Personally, I'd find it rather depressing if I had enjoyed a good life until I was about 50/60. To then find myself broke as a pensionist & not have enough money to do ANY traveling whatsoever (let alone go for a beer with my buddies in the evening). State pension = non-existant in 25-40 years from now.

Indeed - except I am not so sure about the "young" part, being almost 40.
Sorry I meant "young AND don't have a family/house/insurances back home".

« Reply #45 on: January 07, 2012, 11:04 »
0
Well, reading all these answers i was a little bit surprised, that travel photos aren't very popular. Maybe there could be a good idea to take photos of famous buildings and other objects and then in Photoshop make it isolated objects. Like this:
http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-78671p1.html#id=85458973

Too much work & visually often doesn't work for many buildings. Editorial customers probably prefer the "real thing". Advertising customers -> could be problematic with releases. (UNESCO, London Underground, British Heritage,...)

I think this type of photos should be quite popular in microstocks and could help earn a little bit more money from travel photos.
I guess after all we could conclude that travel photos won't make big money. But it can compensate at least part of travel expenses. And this is very good thing.

So in other words: If you're shooting sill lifes for stock, and the props cost $10 per image, would you be happy to only make $9 back? (Sorry for the cynicism, but I had to ask :)
Thing is: If you do it on the side, during a holiday you would have taken anyway, it's OK. But serious travel photography takes time & effort. And that might not go down well with your partner/kids who want to go to the beach, visit museums & have dinner. (Dinner often interfering with the "blue hour" ;)

Personally i am interested in travel photo not because i expect to get rich from it - it's just that i'm already bored of spending most of my time near computer (i work with computer graphics, vector illustrations). And traveling a little bit with photo camera would be a good and interesting experience ;)

Travel is always a good experience. Get to see new things & meet different cultures. But don't underestimate the time spent on computers: cataloguing, editing, colour-correcting, retouching, keywording, and (in your case, see above) creating cutouts.

« Reply #46 on: January 07, 2012, 13:56 »
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I am based in Malaysia and I am shooting travel during my free time in SE Asia. Just back from Vientiane, Luang Prabang and Hanoi, lot of editing to do now....

@antistock interesting stats
''most of my sales for South East Asia are about Thailand.
Laos .. never made a sale so far, Vietnam just a few, Cambodia good, Malaysia good (mostly Petronas Towers and KL),
Singapore good, Myanmar zero.''

For me for sales best is Malaysia and Thailand, I ll see how Laos and Vietnam are doing.....


« Reply #47 on: January 07, 2012, 18:08 »
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I would say that if I had to keyword my entire portfolio, after 'landscape' and 'nature', i'd probably pick 'travel'.  And to be honest, they do sell fairly well.  But there's just not enough of the photos.  As everyone has said, you are at the mercy of the weather that 1-2 days you get to spend somewhere, so after a 2 week trip, I might only have 3 or 4 good photos.  Good thing its a hobby!

« Reply #48 on: January 08, 2012, 00:01 »
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i've been a traveling photographer for over 35 years now -but as others have said,  for me the travel is primary and i'd do it anyway; the photography sales alone won't pay for it.  so you need some other approach to supporting yourself - for me it's been a combination of database consulting, computer game design, ebay-amazon selling and photography - with varying emphases over the years

now, as i've recently started receiving socal security, i can use that as a supplement and  continue to travel while eliminating or reducing the other areas.

ShadySue

« Reply #49 on: January 13, 2012, 14:08 »
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I've heard that travel photos are very succesful in microstock,

I wouldn't say that "travel" photos are very successful, but good "location" photos might be.  ie., it may not be worth the expense to travel to England, say, when there are thousands of snappers living there who already have the entire island documented in stock.  Same as anywhere else.  There's likely someone who lives there that can take all the time they want to shoot good images, instead of your 1-2 days passing through.

But so often, they don't. Many microstock photographers don't ever leave their studios. I've just in the past few minutes discovered an experienced microstocker located in an interesting and understocked area, and not one photo in their port was taken out of doors. Kinda leaving a gap for travelling stock togs in their area. I've know at least two other cities which are undersupplied with at least one diamond iStocker living right in the city concerned who shoot only studio stuff.

« Reply #50 on: January 13, 2012, 14:44 »
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I see huge problem especially for "western folks". You are used to your comfort (no offense), eating out, having beer in pub (doesnt matter how much it costs), renting car instead of going by bus etc. Ppl from for example post communist countries like me can live even in wester Europe for $1200 a month without much problems. And living costs in rest of the world outside EU, USA, Canada and Australia are usually much much cheaper. You can live in many countries for just few hundred $$ a month. You can do that even with micro only.

You dont have to stay in hotel or B&B - just go to cheap off season hostel or share with other travellers. Cook instead eating out. Avoid pubs as they are extremely pricy. Hitchhike if you must or travel by last minute super cheap flights. Share car, buy railroad passes etc. In summer sleep in camps or in remote areas camp outdoors...
There are dozens of ways how to save money. Ive been 3 weeks in Norway from south to Lofoten and back - all including food and camps was $800.

Travel photography is not so good on microstock. But microstock is just a tiny part of agency photography and agencies are just a tiny part of total photography business. And demand for travel pictures is higher then it ever was. There are still ways how to get in the business. But it is not easy of course ;)   

ShadySue

« Reply #51 on: January 13, 2012, 22:35 »
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It's not comfort which worries me. I'd never sleep worrying for about my camera equipment if I was in a hostel dorm - the cheaper you travel, the most difficult the logistics of keeping your equipment safe becomes. E.g. if you don't have a safe in your room, you have to carry all your important stuff with you all the time. One time I was on a 'second class, air-conditioned' overnight long-distance train where all I had between 'me and my equipment' and 'all comers' was a curtain - having my head on my camera bag and my hand through the shoulder strap wasn't conducive to sleep.

« Reply #52 on: January 17, 2012, 22:09 »
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I have lots of travel photos in my portfolio, but they are not big money makers.  Very satisfying to sell however and I always have my camera with me when I travel.  We travel fairly often around the world and enjoy taking photos for fun, not always for stock.  Quite honestly, a photo of a pine cone sells nearly as much as my "best" travel shots.  I do it for fun, send some of them in and am happy when they sell.  It would be very hard to make significant dollars the way I do it, but shooting editorial opens more possibilities. I have enough iStock income that my accountant says I am able to expense out significant travel costs for days when I spend at least half of the time shooting or scouting shots. That is pretty nice come tax time.


 

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