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Author Topic: Are you on Flikr? Are you making money there?  (Read 12419 times)

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« Reply #25 on: May 02, 2011, 21:16 »
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I think the key to getting noticed on Flickr starts with the following.

- Having shots people are interested in
- Expending the effort to get known, join groups, make contacts, comment, etc

Both take alot of effort, more time than a lot of us have. But once you have that audience, as I have seen with a few of the top guys, you'll achieve more views in a few hours than most will in a year. How much traffic that directs to your website, and ultimate sales, or commissions is another thing. Probably depends on who's looking...which is always the case.


« Reply #26 on: May 02, 2011, 21:34 »
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I think the key to getting noticed on Flickr starts with the following.

- Having shots people are interested in
- Expending the effort to get known, join groups, make contacts, comment, etc

Both take alot of effort, more time than a lot of us have. But once you have that audience, as I have seen with a few of the top guys, you'll achieve more views in a few hours than most will in a year. How much traffic that directs to your website, and ultimate sales, or commissions is another thing. Probably depends on who's looking...which is always the case.

Talk about the effort, I mean where the heck do those people take the time to browse different groups and comment like a machine gun just to have others counter-comment on their stuff? And then it's basically just fuzzy, warm comments from many "non-pros" that are useless comments.

Those "top guys" wouldn't be doing well if they didn't spend a significant time shooting or doing what they do best.

Unless they perfected their business in a way where they work 4 hours a week shooting and the rest is outsourcing the RAW stuff to post-processors and uploaders so they can pimp their own portfolio around the internet for the rest of the time.

I'm trying to work 10 hours a day (7 days a week) just on images and illustrations, uploading everything asap to keep the stream of new stuff running. Then I'm supposed to be blogging, run my personal/business web site as my electronic business card, pimp my stuff on Zazzle and Co., have a life, take care of a household etc.? Every day I'm running out of those lousy 24 hours.

No idea how those "top guys" are doing it.

« Reply #27 on: May 02, 2011, 21:57 »
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At some point you know they have to hire people....its just not humanly possible, even if you are a machine that runs on expresso. ;o)

« Reply #28 on: May 03, 2011, 02:31 »
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@ Lisa and click_click: I opened my account less than a month ago and have just about 40 images online so it's too early to tell. I don't get much traffic to my website in general, but I can tell from my cPanel stats that many visitors are being referred from Flickr. It's kind of an experiment and I'm looking for all sorts of traffic right now - be it clients, other illustrators, bloggers, haters or admirers - everything counts :) Once the site's ripe for targeted traffic I'll look into advertising on Google.

My main intention with the Flickr experiment is of course to get clients for freelance work, but I've also posted referral links on my portfolio page (to get buyers to sign up, not contributors). Dreamstime has the best system, as they keep referrals "in mind" for a month (a cookie is stored telling DT that the buyer came from your site, even if it was 29 days ago) and you get 10% of their purchases for three years. I've had no signups so far, but at Graphic Leftovers I can see that people are actually clicking even though GL is the last site I've listed, so I imagine people are clicking my DT referral link also (first one listed).

Will get back to this thread with results if anything interesting happens :)

lthn

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« Reply #29 on: May 03, 2011, 03:11 »
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I think the key to getting noticed on Flickr starts with the following.

....


hotties : )

lagereek

« Reply #30 on: May 03, 2011, 03:59 »
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@ Lisa and click_click: I opened my account less than a month ago and have just about 40 images online so it's too early to tell. I don't get much traffic to my website in general, but I can tell from my cPanel stats that many visitors are being referred from Flickr. It's kind of an experiment and I'm looking for all sorts of traffic right now - be it clients, other illustrators, bloggers, haters or admirers - everything counts :) Once the site's ripe for targeted traffic I'll look into advertising on Google.

My main intention with the Flickr experiment is of course to get clients for freelance work, but I've also posted referral links on my portfolio page (to get buyers to sign up, not contributors). Dreamstime has the best system, as they keep referrals "in mind" for a month (a cookie is stored telling Dreamstime that the buyer came from your site, even if it was 29 days ago) and you get 10% of their purchases for three years. I've had no signups so far, but at Graphic Leftovers I can see that people are actually clicking even though GL is the last site I've listed, so I imagine people are clicking my Dreamstime referral link also (first one listed).

Will get back to this thread with results if anything interesting happens :)


Yep!  also noticed an incredible amount of views at GL, I mean lots!  and its strange not resulting in sales. Might ofcourse be taht lots of members are also looking at each others work?  dont know.

helix7

« Reply #31 on: May 03, 2011, 07:55 »
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I wonder if there's any value in taking advantage of the Creative Commons search capability at flickr. I've used it to find free images to use in blogs. They're not great images, but they sometimes are good enough to accompany a blog post and they're usually free as long as you attribute the image to the owner, usually by linking to them or their website and/or giving credit below the image.

Might be worthwhile to throw a few LCV images up there under the CC license and let people use them for free as long as they link back to you. It could generate some traffic to your flickr page, your website, and maybe lead to some sales or work.

I'm not a fan of giving anything away for free, but we all have some images that just don't sell or aren't even available on stock sites. Maybe they can be used on flickr to generate some traffic through CC licensing.

helix7

« Reply #32 on: May 03, 2011, 08:10 »
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Quick tip that's worked well for me: Use flickr Groups. I've noticed that images I submit to Groups have significantly higher views. I'm a vector artist, so I joined a few vector groups and submit images to them, and those images have a lot more views, sometimes 1000+. Not sure if it's quality traffic, and it could be a lot of other vector folks looking at my stuff. But it's significantly more traffic than my non-group images get.

lisafx

« Reply #33 on: May 03, 2011, 10:36 »
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Thanks Thomas, and Mike (Helix) for sharing some very useful ideas.  Much appreciated!

TheSmilingAssassin

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« Reply #34 on: May 03, 2011, 10:57 »
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Lisa,

I got on the flickr bandwagon some months ago to promote some of my work (not microstock).  I have a link under each image that directs to my work elsewhere.  I find its really useful for bumping up my work in google and now a lot of it is coming up on page one. 

It would be useless doing this to drive traffic to Microstock sites because the micros already come up high in search results.  What you probably should do is link to your own website (on ktools) so that your images can compete on google with the micros.

A little tip if you do decide to do this... dont put the link under your images until your account gets approved otherwise it could end up being marked as NIPSA (not in public search areas) which would make it useless.  You should submit about 20 and let them sit there till the account is approved and then go back and add the links and the rest of your images.

lisafx

« Reply #35 on: May 03, 2011, 11:06 »
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Lisa,

I got on the flickr bandwagon some months ago to promote some of my work (not microstock).  I have a link under each image that directs to my work elsewhere.  I find its really useful for bumping up my work in google and now a lot of it is coming up on page one. 

It would be useless doing this to drive traffic to Microstock sites because the micros already come up high in search results.  What you probably should do is link to your own website (on ktools) so that your images can compete on google with the micros.

A little tip if you do decide to do this... dont put the link under your images until your account gets approved otherwise it could end up being marked as NIPSA (not in public search areas) which would make it useless.  You should submit about 20 and let them sit there till the account is approved and then go back and add the links and the rest of your images.

Very helpful suggestions Pseudonymous!  Thanks!  :)

One question - after your account is approved, can you go ahead and upload the images with links already in them?   

TheSmilingAssassin

    This user is banned.
« Reply #36 on: May 03, 2011, 11:30 »
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Lisa,

I got on the flickr bandwagon some months ago to promote some of my work (not microstock).  I have a link under each image that directs to my work elsewhere.  I find its really useful for bumping up my work in google and now a lot of it is coming up on page one.  

It would be useless doing this to drive traffic to Microstock sites because the micros already come up high in search results.  What you probably should do is link to your own website (on ktools) so that your images can compete on google with the micros.

A little tip if you do decide to do this... dont put the link under your images until your account gets approved otherwise it could end up being marked as NIPSA (not in public search areas) which would make it useless.  You should submit about 20 and let them sit there till the account is approved and then go back and add the links and the rest of your images.

Very helpful suggestions Pseudonymous!  Thanks!  :)

One question - after your account is approved, can you go ahead and upload the images with links already in them?  

You're welcome!

Not sure if you wrote that backwards?  Did you mean "after your account is approved, can you go ahead and add links to images already uploaded?"  If that's what you meant, then yes.

If not, perhaps you've misunderstood what I meant.  What I was suggesting was to go create an account with flickr and upload about 20 images, without adding a link in the description of the image (that appears below the image).  After your account is approved, or rather reviewed and marked so that your images appear in search results, then go back to those 20 images and add the link in your description to direct viewers (or hopefully buyers) to your ktools website.  Then upload the rest of your images and include the links to those in the description.  Once your account is approved, all images you uploade in the future will be searchable automatically.

The reason I'm saying to wait for your account to be reviewed is to avoid some reviewer marking your account as "NIPSA" thinking you're only using flickr to sell your images.  By leaving the link out initially, you'll avoid risking this.

To see whether your account is reviewed and approved, in your image page (when you upload it) you'll see on the right towards the bottom of the page, a heading that says "Owner Settings (show more)"  If you click on "show more" you'll see a little green box with the words "Anyone can see this photo" next to it.  Before it's approved I think the box is red and it says something like "this photo doesn't appear in search results"  or something to that effect.

Hope I've explained it properly.  

Cheers :)
« Last Edit: May 03, 2011, 11:35 by pseudonymous »

lisafx

« Reply #37 on: May 03, 2011, 11:52 »
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 What I was suggesting was to go create an account with flickr and upload about 20 images, without adding a link in the description of the image (that appears below the image).  After your account is approved, or rather reviewed and marked so that your images appear in search results, then go back to those 20 images and add the link in your description to direct viewers (or hopefully buyers) to your ktools website.  Then upload the rest of your images and include the links to those in the description.  Once your account is approved, all images you uploade in the future will be searchable automatically.


Great!  Yes, that answers my question.  Thanks again! 

TheSmilingAssassin

    This user is banned.
« Reply #38 on: May 03, 2011, 11:53 »
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Lisa,

I got on the flickr bandwagon some months ago to promote some of my work (not microstock).  I have a link under each image that directs to my work elsewhere.  I find its really useful for bumping up my work in google and now a lot of it is coming up on page one. 

It would be useless doing this to drive traffic to Microstock sites because the micros already come up high in search results.  What you probably should do is link to your own website (on ktools) so that your images can compete on google with the micros.

A little tip if you do decide to do this... dont put the link under your images until your account gets approved otherwise it could end up being marked as NIPSA (not in public search areas) which would make it useless.  You should submit about 20 and let them sit there till the account is approved and then go back and add the links and the rest of your images.

Very helpful suggestions Pseudonymous!  Thanks!  :)

One question - after your account is approved, can you go ahead and upload the images with links already in them?   

lol, sorry, I see what you mean now (my brain goes fuzzy after 3am).  Yes, after your account is approved, you can go ahead and add links to the 'new' images you upload.  

TheSmilingAssassin

    This user is banned.
« Reply #39 on: May 03, 2011, 11:54 »
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 What I was suggesting was to go create an account with flickr and upload about 20 images, without adding a link in the description of the image (that appears below the image).  After your account is approved, or rather reviewed and marked so that your images appear in search results, then go back to those 20 images and add the link in your description to direct viewers (or hopefully buyers) to your ktools website.  Then upload the rest of your images and include the links to those in the description.  Once your account is approved, all images you uploade in the future will be searchable automatically.


Great!  Yes, that answers my question.  Thanks again! 

No worries :)

« Reply #40 on: May 03, 2011, 12:56 »
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I got on the flickr bandwagon some months ago to promote some of my work (not microstock).  I have a link under each image that directs to my work elsewhere.  I find its really useful for bumping up my work in google and now a lot of it is coming up on page one. 

It would be useless doing this to drive traffic to Microstock sites because the micros already come up high in search results.  What you probably should do is link to your own website (on ktools) so that your images can compete on google with the micros.

A little tip if you do decide to do this... dont put the link under your images until your account gets approved otherwise it could end up being marked as NIPSA (not in public search areas) which would make it useless.  You should submit about 20 and let them sit there till the account is approved and then go back and add the links and the rest of your images.

I don't believe Flickr really exists. It's probably just a heist by big computer businesses to get our images for free. I expect that Obama and Bush are all part of it too __ otherwise how could the big businesses get away with it, eh? The media are probably involved too because they want the pictures. I can't believe that Pseudonymous was stupid enough to have been duped by the Flickr scam just because he saw it on the web and assumed it was for real.

« Reply #41 on: May 03, 2011, 13:10 »
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Some people seem to have an issue with Flickr while others love it.

I personally think it is great. I am active on the site and within the flickr community. There are a number of great groups and people who really know what they are talking about. The Strobist has a great community and I have learned most, if not all, of my lighting stuff through them. It has been an invaluable resource for me.

I have had a number of paid jobs based on work people have seen on flickr. I had a guy from London see an image of mine on explore and he hired me to do some work for a label he owns. I have also sold images that were found on google images that pointed to my flickr site. I am also a part of the Getty collection. I am contracted by Getty and it has paid very well.

The thing about views and such is that you really have to be active in the community for it to pay off. You can't throw up some images and expect people to just flock to them. I have been on flickr for about two years and I average around 500 views a day from a lot of different sources.

There is a theft issue, but watermark and only upload small files. I have seen just as many images of mine used with the Getty Images watermark in place so I don't worry about it too much, if an image is online, it can be stolen. It's not a flickr only issue.

Flickr users are also starting to see value in their images, so more and more people are charging for use rather than giving it away for free like before.

I think in the end, its really a great communty site and should be seen that way. I think buyers are using flickr and google images more and more to look for images, so it can't hurt to have an account.


lthn

    This user is banned.
« Reply #42 on: May 03, 2011, 14:31 »
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Flickr links don't work as ranking backlinks, just so you know... no seo advantage except for the # of visitors to your site

lisafx

« Reply #43 on: May 03, 2011, 15:22 »
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Flickr links don't work as ranking backlinks, just so you know... no seo advantage except for the # of visitors to your site

Good to know.  Thanks :)

And Chad, thanks for sharing your experience.  Very interesting to hear how the Flikr community has developed over the past couple of years.  I am impressed you have gotten so much paid work through them!  This is exactly the type of info I was looking for when starting this thread. 

« Reply #44 on: May 03, 2011, 17:22 »
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No problem. Just remember its work, but it is fun. Be careful with commercial links as they don't really like them. You are allowed one link to a personal site but your site cannot have anything directly for sale. So if you sell stock or prints and link to it, they will not take kindly to it.

You can, however, put as many links of whatever you want in your profile.

The best way to take advantage of Flickr is to be active and be a part of the community. More people will follow you and comment on your work, favorite your photos and such. The favorites and comments, the more likely the photo is seen by others. Favorites link to your photos, so if someone browses someone elses favorite photos, they see and link through to yours. The more favorites, the more external link to your photos....

But again, you have to be active, make friends and have fun!

« Reply #45 on: May 03, 2011, 18:14 »
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Excellent info on flikr, thanks all for posting the tips.

It's almost getting to the point where we spend 24/7 in front of the computer...not just post-processing and uploading of images, but doing the marketing and socializing too. Yikes, I need to get an ergonomic chair, my back is killing me from sitting in front of the screen.  :)

« Reply #46 on: May 03, 2011, 20:33 »
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Excellent info on flikr, thanks all for posting the tips.

It's almost getting to the point where we spend 24/7 in front of the computer...not just post-processing and uploading of images, but doing the marketing and socializing too. Yikes, I need to get an ergonomic chair, my back is killing me from sitting in front of the screen.  :)

I know, it really sucks! I always have something to do online, banking, shopping, browsing...it drives me nuts because there are endless sites to visit! Don't get me started on research sites, post processing tutorials and the like! Same with my iPhone!!!

I almost wish I could go back to film and these new hi-tech gadgets never exsisted! We would know what we were missing and my mind wouldn't always be racing!

TheSmilingAssassin

    This user is banned.
« Reply #47 on: May 03, 2011, 22:07 »
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I got on the flickr bandwagon some months ago to promote some of my work (not microstock).  I have a link under each image that directs to my work elsewhere.  I find its really useful for bumping up my work in google and now a lot of it is coming up on page one. 

It would be useless doing this to drive traffic to Microstock sites because the micros already come up high in search results.  What you probably should do is link to your own website (on ktools) so that your images can compete on google with the micros.

A little tip if you do decide to do this... dont put the link under your images until your account gets approved otherwise it could end up being marked as NIPSA (not in public search areas) which would make it useless.  You should submit about 20 and let them sit there till the account is approved and then go back and add the links and the rest of your images.

I don't believe Flickr really exists. It's probably just a heist by big computer businesses to get our images for free. I expect that Obama and Bush are all part of it too __ otherwise how could the big businesses get away with it, eh? The media are probably involved too because they want the pictures. I can't believe that Pseudonymous was stupid enough to have been duped by the Flickr scam just because he saw it on the web and assumed it was for real.

Flickr is secretly owned by al qaeda!

TheSmilingAssassin

    This user is banned.
« Reply #48 on: May 03, 2011, 22:10 »
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Flickr links don't work as ranking backlinks, just so you know... no seo advantage except for the # of visitors to your site

If this was in reference to my posts, I just want to make it clear that I'm not using the links as backlinks and when I said my work's now on page one on google, I was referring to the flickr images, not the original images.  I'm definitely getting more traffic to the original site from doing this but it's not just about uploading an image and throwing up a link.... you have to be smart about it with the meta deta.

TheSmilingAssassin

    This user is banned.
« Reply #49 on: May 03, 2011, 22:14 »
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No problem. Just remember its work, but it is fun. Be careful with commercial links as they don't really like them. You are allowed one link to a personal site but your site cannot have anything directly for sale. So if you sell stock or prints and link to it, they will not take kindly to it.

You can, however, put as many links of whatever you want in your profile.

The best way to take advantage of Flickr is to be active and be a part of the community. More people will follow you and comment on your work, favorite your photos and such. The favorites and comments, the more likely the photo is seen by others. Favorites link to your photos, so if someone browses someone elses favorite photos, they see and link through to yours. The more favorites, the more external link to your photos....

But again, you have to be active, make friends and have fun!

I'm not social in the forums or deal with the community at all and I don't intend to.  I'm not after other flickr contributors who use the forum viewing my images.  I do it to gain exposure through google.

If the only way flickr would bring me sales was if I was involved in the community, I wouldn't bother.  Who has time for that?  Reading posts in here is a stretch most days.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2011, 22:51 by pseudonymous »


 

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