MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: BBC news getty images year in focus  (Read 4274 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« on: December 28, 2016, 03:31 »
+9
Every year around this time the BBC, which is not supposed to have advertising, does an barely disguised promotional piece for getty images. A year in review written by a getty employee with getty images and blurb going on about how great getty's collection is.

It makes me sick whenever i see it, especially as part of the bbc's remit is "stimulating creativity and cultural excellence" and here they are doing free promotion for one of the most damaging companies to creatives using my license fee money.

I will be putting in a complaint to the BBC and would urge everyone else concerned to do so.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2016, 03:37 by Justanotherphotographer »


« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2016, 03:37 »
0
Will keep an eye out for it......

« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2016, 03:52 »
0
When? Where? Never noticed it....

gyllens

« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2016, 04:08 »
0
Such BS! I can not belive it. Almost all their old knowledable staff is gone and replaced by the second rate old Istock staff and probably for half the salary since they lack any form of creative knowledge.
They have during 2016 lost more of the old established photographers then ever before.
Their treatment of contributors remain the same: appalling!

Oh yes what a great year.

« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2016, 04:26 »
+5
Frankly, I'm less worried about this than the propensity of the BBC (and many other organisations) to use images from Google street view to illustrate their news stories and to fill their pages with pictures sent in by viewers.  At least with the Getty pictures we know that real professional photographers, like ourselves, have been paid for their work.

alno

« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2016, 05:02 »
+2
Every year around this time the BBC, which is not supposed to have advertising, does an barely disguised promotional piece for getty images. A year in review written by a getty employee with getty images and blurb going on about how great getty's collection is.


Don't ask why istock commission is the lowest in the market, so many promotional expences... :)

« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2016, 05:54 »
+1
Okay I am at my computer now and off my phone so here's some links.
Last years:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-35091202
Title:
"Getty Images year in focus" what I mean can you imagine any other company being allowed a headline like this on the BBC. If I was one of their competitors I would be fuming! I can't believe they have gotten in bed with a commercial interest like this!
The whole thing is also written by a Getty employee for goodness sake.

Anyway here's a example of the (ad like) text:
"Pinney had plenty to choose from with his photographers covering more than 130,000 events around the world."

And just found this years:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-38301351

"Hugh Pinney from Getty Images has picked out some of the most powerful images of the year."

"Getty Images archive - with more than 100 million images - is truly a treasure trove, so any excuse to dig for a while and resurface material that has new relevance is a treat."
(Grrrrrr)

Imagine this was any other product in a competitive industry, there would be a huge outcry. I don't get how they get away with being in bed with Getty over this year after year. I mean they even had a huge outcry because they were seen to be covering Apple product releases too much, they weren't even putting a positive spin on them, just reporting that there was a launch and big queues etc.


Edit: spelling and grammar

« Last Edit: December 28, 2016, 05:58 by Justanotherphotographer »

« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2016, 06:01 »
0
And here is the link for BBC complaints:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/complaints/

« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2016, 09:32 »
0
Frankly, I'm less worried about this than the propensity of the BBC (and many other organisations) to use images from Google street view to illustrate their news stories and to fill their pages with pictures sent in by viewers.  At least with the Getty pictures we know that real professional photographers, like ourselves, have been paid for their work.

I doubt it. I think Getty probably calls stuff like this Getty promotional use for which they don't need to pay their contributors.

I hadn't noticed the BBC using non professional content very much at all. I noticed local papers doing it. I can see why it's worrying for future income but it doesn't offend me. If people want to give away photos for free that's up to them. The news organisations using google street view and the like just look unprofessional.

op

« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2016, 13:55 »
0
I don't see what it's shocking here.. It's news stuff. Apart Getty's editorial division, all the other companies (AP, Reuters and AFP) that cover the world's events are direct competition to BBC on the news side.. And I can tell you that BBC get some pretty good deals from GI too..

« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2016, 15:20 »
+6
If you understand the bbc's remit and how touchy they are about any kind of even inadvertant brand promotion (having to state "other brands are also available" even when they mention something by accident) this really goes against the grain. It is maddening to see them in bed with a for profit company that treats it's contributors the way getty does (ignoring all the other controversial business practices)

Why do they need to have an employee of any other company on there promoting their content? Can't a bbc editor do a round up using content from several photo agencies, maybe including alamy, a British company at least that compensates contributors better and donates a massive amount to charity?

« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2016, 16:28 »
+3
I don't see what it's shocking here.. It's news stuff. Apart Getty's editorial division, all the other companies (AP, Reuters and AFP) that cover the world's events are direct competition to BBC on the news side.. And I can tell you that BBC get some pretty good deals from GI too..
The fact they get good deals is the concerning thing the BBCs reputation rests on its being impartial not being sponsored by brands

dpimborough

« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2016, 17:45 »
+3
I just submitted my complaint to the Beeb especially as they are using a lot more iStock/Getty images recently

« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2016, 20:01 »
+1
Complaint submitted

ShadySue

« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2016, 20:17 »
0
I just submitted my complaint to the Beeb especially as they are using a lot more iStock/Getty images recently
I'm glad about that - maybe I should write and congratulate them!

op

« Reply #15 on: December 29, 2016, 00:35 »
+1
Alamy doesn't have press mandated photographers all around the world.. BBC is the same so they need a media partner for their coverage. It is not about iStock or creative Getty contributors but full time press mandated photographers.. If Getty were treating them so badly, why do they still work for them yet? In the same time, I know nothing about work ethics of AP, Reuters or AFP..

French medias are as sensitive as BBC regarding brand promotion but they do the same for AFP.

« Reply #16 on: December 29, 2016, 04:31 »
+2
Sorry but you don't understand the BBC's unique role or funding structure. Which is fine, but most in the UK do and understand what the problem with this is.

There is a supplier to the BBC of a certain product (licensed images) being allowed by the bbc to review which the best products of the year, in that same category, are. It's outrageous.

Aside from that there's a circle jerk going on here where getty's reputation is being sent sky high by things like this and then things like this are justified by saying how great getty's reputation and reach are.


« Reply #17 on: December 29, 2016, 04:36 »
+3
... And I can tell you that BBC get some pretty good deals from GI too..
Just this statement demonstrates my point. The idea that bbc news could be offering coverage on its web page in exchange for good deals is enough to get questions asked. If they were actually doing that there would be a public enquiry set up.

gyllens

« Reply #18 on: December 29, 2016, 05:28 »
0
Just occationally the BBC will buy from GI. The main bulk they buy from some completely different and specialized agencies which are not to be seen on the right side column here.

ShadySue

« Reply #19 on: December 29, 2016, 05:41 »
+2
Just occationally the BBC will buy from GI. The main bulk they buy from some completely different and specialized agencies which are not to be seen on the right side column here.
They buy lots from Getty, just look at the credits at the end of a lot of programmes.

gyllens

« Reply #20 on: December 29, 2016, 07:12 »
0
Just occationally the BBC will buy from GI. The main bulk they buy from some completely different and specialized agencies which are not to be seen on the right side column here.
They buy lots from Getty, just look at the credits at the end of a lot of programmes.

Yes they buy from GI!  but I know the picture buyer at the BBC and some 80% comes from completely different type of agencies. Its a good client and they buy in bulk sometimes. Two years back I sold them 14 pictures of  eye-surgery. They bought copyright and everything for using them later in their own library.

ShadySue

« Reply #21 on: December 29, 2016, 07:41 »
0
An acquaintance happened to be out birdwatching in a gale (!) when he saw a wind turbine catch fire, which apparently is really unusual. As he had his long lens with him, he was able to get usable photos (despite the very low light) which he sent to the Beeb and at least one was used on their news broadcasts and website and they also 'syndicated' it. He said he got a "very useful amount of money" from it, but he didn't specify how much. He doesn't sell at all, in general, so had no way of uploading to e.g. Alamy or Getty (etc.).

« Reply #22 on: March 16, 2017, 16:56 »
+4
www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/39217548
what seriously! Another article this time about how getty is fighting against traditional stock with their realistic portrayal of women in engineering. And guess what, their examples of "bad" stock photos are from thinkstock. So as well as being even more advertorial for brand getty paid for by my license money they are throwing our work under the bus to do it. I don't know how the bbc are getting away with this!

« Reply #23 on: March 16, 2017, 18:29 »
+1
www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/39217548
what seriously! Another article this time about how getty is fighting against traditional stock with their realistic portrayal of women in engineering. And guess what, their examples of "bad" stock photos are from thinkstock. So as well as being even more advertorial for brand getty paid for by my license money they are throwing our work under the bus to do it. I don't know how the bbc are getting away with this!
Very lazy and stupid article about 5 years too late.

« Reply #24 on: March 20, 2017, 08:08 »
+2
Well okay, here we go: http://www.bbcmotiongallery.com/

"We have entered into a global partnership with Getty Images and you will find all of our incredible online content and offline archive at:
www.gettyimages.com/bbcmotiongallery"


I'm so f*cking pissed right now. That explains why they are giving Getty so much lovely free publicity.

Where are all the other agencies in this? SS and Alamy should be writing some pretty sternly worded letters right now (of course they can't as the BBC is too big and prestigious a customer).

ETA
https://photoarchivenews.com/news/getty-images-represents-bbc-motion-gallery-5-year-exclusive-deal/


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
30 Replies
9393 Views
Last post December 08, 2008, 17:13
by lagereek
58 Replies
10739 Views
Last post February 27, 2015, 02:54
by Phadrea
39 Replies
5484 Views
Last post November 05, 2015, 17:23
by etudiante_rapide
10 Replies
2184 Views
Last post January 30, 2016, 03:45
by Carmen
34 Replies
7395 Views
Last post March 06, 2018, 17:15
by cobalt

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results