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Author Topic: Shutterstock--No Downloads in six days.  (Read 4419 times)

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« Reply #50 on: August 29, 2019, 08:15 »
+4
By chance I came across this article on wine from June last year in the Smithsonian magazine:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/california-wine-shows-traces-fukushima-fallout-180969726/

I think that their use of a free photo from Pixabay (pity that the meniscus of the wine is not horizontal!) also tells us that decining sales of traditional microstock may also have to do with 'free'. Before 'free', reputable magazines relied on SS etc as their first port of call for images. Now they first go to 'free' and if they can't find what they want, they then go to the regular MS agencies.

I have no doubt that many other image users also do similar. (No doubt the reason that SS and Adobe see fit to sponsor Pixabay with ads...which suggest that if the client can't find what he wants at Pixabay they should go to SS or Adobe).

Who upload on Pixabay images and videos and gives them away for free?

Hipsters


« Reply #51 on: August 29, 2019, 08:32 »
0
By chance I came across this article on wine from June last year in the Smithsonian magazine:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/california-wine-shows-traces-fukushima-fallout-180969726/

I think that their use of a free photo from Pixabay (pity that the meniscus of the wine is not horizontal!) also tells us that decining sales of traditional microstock may also have to do with 'free'. Before 'free', reputable magazines relied on SS etc as their first port of call for images. Now they first go to 'free' and if they can't find what they want, they then go to the regular MS agencies.

I have no doubt that many other image users also do similar. (No doubt the reason that SS and Adobe see fit to sponsor Pixabay with ads...which suggest that if the client can't find what he wants at Pixabay they should go to SS or Adobe).

Who upload on Pixabay images and videos and gives them away for free?
a lot of people do it seems then wonder why their work turns up nicked on shutterstock.

« Reply #52 on: August 29, 2019, 10:27 »
0
For me--No downloads from Shutterstock in six days straight. I don't know why this is happening.  Anyone else having less downloads?  Thanks.

I just wonder how much you upload per month? Once i stopped uploading for a 4 months my downloads dropped by a half. Now i uploading average 300 photos per month and my downloads and earnings are higher every month...
 If you stop uploading or make a longer brake your photos wont show up on first pages of search engine.
Second thing, is your content seasonal if yes your earnings will go up and down through the year.






OM

« Reply #53 on: August 29, 2019, 11:01 »
0
By chance I came across this article on wine from June last year in the Smithsonian magazine:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/california-wine-shows-traces-fukushima-fallout-180969726/

I think that their use of a free photo from Pixabay (pity that the meniscus of the wine is not horizontal!) also tells us that decining sales of traditional microstock may also have to do with 'free'. Before 'free', reputable magazines relied on SS etc as their first port of call for images. Now they first go to 'free' and if they can't find what they want, they then go to the regular MS agencies.

I have no doubt that many other image users also do similar. (No doubt the reason that SS and Adobe see fit to sponsor Pixabay with ads...which suggest that if the client can't find what he wants at Pixabay they should go to SS or Adobe).

Who upload on Pixabay images and videos and gives them away for free?

Sufficient amateurs with (often) sufficient talent to make it worthwhile for traditional microstock buyers to go there first. The quality of 'free' has become considerably better than it used to be and there may be a site that actually reviews/curates your submission before allowing it. Now, that's a really great way to hook the amateurs.
But not only amateurs.... I once read an article about a pro? food photographer who put some good photos on Unsplash to attract potential buyers to her studio for commissioned work. How successful she was, I don't know but she used 'free' as a marketing instrument.

ShadySue

« Reply #54 on: August 29, 2019, 19:32 »
0
Who upload on Pixabay images and videos and gives them away for free?
All the people who choose to do so. Too many to provide you with a list of names, you'll need to check Pixabay out for that information.

« Reply #55 on: August 30, 2019, 20:30 »
0
Sufficient amateurs with (often) sufficient talent to make it worthwhile for traditional microstock buyers to go there first. The quality of 'free' has become considerably better than it used to be and there may be a site that actually reviews/curates your submission before allowing it. Now, that's a really great way to hook the amateurs.
But not only amateurs.... I once read an article about a pro? food photographer who put some good photos on Unsplash to attract potential buyers to her studio for commissioned work. How successful she was, I don't know but she used 'free' as a marketing instrument.

These sites are not going away, so an enterprising photographer has to find ways to make these places work for them. Showing off work that might not be in your stock sites might get potential clients who like your images to go there as well. There are enough articles about big name companies using these sites, why not get your name and work in front of them?

As well for me, finding some of my images stolen in places that ignore DMCA takedown notices, I'd be willing to post those for free. If I can't make money with them, why let others?

I also post birds, since I have a tonne of vacation snapshots (that took zero time or energy) and they don't make me any money. I know an "expert" who makes little at bird photos, so I don't mind showing mine off there.

« Reply #56 on: August 31, 2019, 02:01 »
+3
It jumped out at me that the wine in that Pixbay image isn't level. The glass is straight up and down, but the wine is higher on the left than the right.

That bothers me. A lot. And it makes me wonder two things

Could this be an image rejected by SS, AS, etc, that somebody offered for free on Pixabay?

Is Smithsonian.com in such severe financial distress that it must resort to using bad free images?

« Last Edit: August 31, 2019, 02:08 by marthamarks »

dpimborough

« Reply #57 on: August 31, 2019, 02:32 »
+2
It jumped out at me that the wine in that Pixbay image isn't level. The glass is straight up and down, but the wine is higher on the left than the right.

That bothers me. A lot. And it makes me wonder two things

Could this be an image rejected by SS, AS, etc, that somebody offered for free on Pixabay?

Is Smithsonian.com in such severe financial distress that it must resort to using bad free images?

RT.com the Russian news site also has started using Pixabay images for general illustrative images.

However one of the worst ones I've encountered is the Newsquest group (local newspapers and magazines) who want even assignment photos for free and issue prizes to their editorial offices for the largest usage of free content (photos and articles)

« Reply #58 on: August 31, 2019, 06:51 »
0
We can make a list of sites or news agencies that start using free Pixabay generic images.

So what?

Will they ever find a "greek police billingual greek english worded ribbon prohibiting entrance in crime scene"?

Naive example. Yes in time they will eventually find and this. But since then, they will have to buy one from somewhere.

People contributing on pixabay or similar, don't care for the needs of customers or the market. And for sure they don't go after enterprise sales as long as they keep shooting random or artistic.

fritz

  • I love Tom and Jerry music

« Reply #59 on: August 31, 2019, 07:09 »
+1
It jumped out at me that the wine in that Pixbay image isn't level. The glass is straight up and down, but the wine is higher on the left than the right.

That bothers me. A lot. And it makes me wonder two things

Could this be an image rejected by SS, AS, etc, that somebody offered for free on Pixabay?

Is Smithsonian.com in such severe financial distress that it must resort to using bad free images?

RT.com the Russian news site also has started using Pixabay images for general illustrative images.


Discovery as well!

dpimborough

« Reply #60 on: August 31, 2019, 09:05 »
+4
We can make a list of sites or news agencies that start using free Pixabay generic images.

So what?

Will they ever find a "greek police billingual greek english worded ribbon prohibiting entrance in crime scene"?

Naive example. Yes in time they will eventually find and this. But since then, they will have to buy one from somewhere.

People contributing on pixabay or similar, don't care for the needs of customers or the market. And for sure they don't go after enterprise sales as long as they keep shooting random or artistic.

Judging by the quality of some of images used on so called high end news sites they don't care.

They'd use any image that remotely fills the bill.  As long as its cheap/free

« Reply #61 on: August 31, 2019, 10:54 »
+3
We can make a list of sites or news agencies that start using free Pixabay generic images.

So what?

Will they ever find a "greek police billingual greek english worded ribbon prohibiting entrance in crime scene"?

Naive example. Yes in time they will eventually find and this. But since then, they will have to buy one from somewhere.

People contributing on pixabay or similar, don't care for the needs of customers or the market. And for sure they don't go after enterprise sales as long as they keep shooting random or artistic.

Judging by the quality of some of images used on so called high end news sites they don't care.

They'd use any image that  remotely fills the bill.  As long as its cheap/free
Yes I think contributors greatly over estimate the quality needs of many of  their customers...often the images are glanced at for fractions of a second. In fact I think crappy looking sloped badly exposed images are quite trendy see the BBC site.

« Reply #62 on: August 31, 2019, 14:23 »
+2
No true income possible to earn on MS these days unless you are extremely devoted and have no life outside. My guess is that by doing stock photography full-time, at least in my case, I would be alone and broke in six months or less. I might as well upload all my stuff to Pixabay, perhaps I would get lots of views which would warm my heart at least, lol...


 

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