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Author Topic: Coronavirus ?  (Read 15361 times)

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« Reply #50 on: March 14, 2020, 18:29 »
+2
Also in lockdown in Spain, it's bonkers how serious it's suddenly got. No going out unless completely necessary.
Just got to sit it out and try to slow it down as much as poss for the health services to be able to cope. And put up with a bored teenager in house ::)
I hope UK closes schools etc down soon. In the beginning I thought they were right about waiting but now I think they need to and quickly.
I don't have the option of staying in, I share the care of my chairbound mother with my sister. I live c40 miles away (two trains and a bus in each direction), she lives c25 miles away. Although she has carers going in four times a day, we are really worried about what will happen if there's a lockdown - the carers don't do e.g. food shopping, washing (of which there is a full load, almost every day), emptying bins etc.
Of course, we don't want to catch the disease and spread it to her, or anyone else, during the incubation period, . Footbumps, no hugs, and blown kisses.

If they close down schools etc, who will look after the children of health / care workers? Some may live near family who are able and willing to help, some may not. So do they stay off their vital work to look after their kids, or informally make arrangements for them to be looked after in groups?
I'm glad I'm not making these decisions. I think there is a case for the concept of 'herd immunity' to prevent a major re-infection next winter, and for slowing down the virus so that the health services can cope with the most vulnerable. But there are so many factors to consider, and the scientists are still learning how this virus behaves. And I am not a scientist.

They can keep schools open just to look after all the essential service workers children. I don't get herd immunity. Seems like a good idea until you combine it with herd mentality. People aren't going to do what the government wants, as we've seen with almost all sport being cancelled. Getting a lot of people infected is going to cause a panic. One of those ideas that works well in theory but they are already seeing it fails in practice. It also seems to be the opposite way almost all the other worlds leading scientists are advising. So many scientists are working flat out on this, they may well have better treatments for the outbreak after this one and they will know much more about what they're dealing with.


« Reply #51 on: March 14, 2020, 19:29 »
+2
Also in lockdown in Spain, it's bonkers how serious it's suddenly got. No going out unless completely necessary.
Just got to sit it out and try to slow it down as much as poss for the health services to be able to cope. And put up with a bored teenager in house ::)
I hope UK closes schools etc down soon. In the beginning I thought they were right about waiting but now I think they need to and quickly.
I don't have the option of staying in, I share the care of my chairbound mother with my sister. I live c40 miles away (two trains and a bus in each direction), she lives c25 miles away. Although she has carers going in four times a day, we are really worried about what will happen if there's a lockdown - the carers don't do e.g. food shopping, washing (of which there is a full load, almost every day), emptying bins etc.
Of course, we don't want to catch the disease and spread it to her, or anyone else, during the incubation period, . Footbumps, no hugs, and blown kisses.

If they close down schools etc, who will look after the children of health / care workers? Some may live near family who are able and willing to help, some may not. So do they stay off their vital work to look after their kids, or informally make arrangements for them to be looked after in groups?
I'm glad I'm not making these decisions. I think there is a case for the concept of 'herd immunity' to prevent a major re-infection next winter, and for slowing down the virus so that the health services can cope with the most vulnerable. But there are so many factors to consider, and the scientists are still learning how this virus behaves. And I am not a scientist.

They can keep schools open just to look after all the essential service workers children. I don't get herd immunity. Seems like a good idea until you combine it with herd mentality. People aren't going to do what the government wants, as we've seen with almost all sport being cancelled. Getting a lot of people infected is going to cause a panic. One of those ideas that works well in theory but they are already seeing it fails in practice. It also seems to be the opposite way almost all the other worlds leading scientists are advising. So many scientists are working flat out on this, they may well have better treatments for the outbreak after this one and they will know much more about what they're dealing with.

I think we may have heard the last of Herd Immunity for a while.  The concept may live on or at least the sensible parts or it.

Matt Hancock the Secretary State for Health tweeted NEWS: My Telegraph article on the next stage of our #coronavirus plan: We must all do everything in our power to protect lives

only problem it was behind a paywall and nobody outside the Tory faithful could read it without paying premium prices. A shitstorm erupted on twitter and the Telegraph lifted the paywall. This is his article https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2020/03/14/must-do-everything-power-protect-lives/?WT.mc_id=tmgliveapp_iosshare_At9w8jYPvkKQ

The first line
" We have a plan, based on the expertise of world-leading scientists. Herd immunity is not a part of it. That is a scientific concept, not a goal or a strategy. Our goal is to protect life from this virus, our strategy is to protect the most vulnerable and protect the NHS through contain, delay, research and mitigate."

These people should not be running a corner shop let alone a government. I hope he got paid well for his article publishing Health Department information.

« Reply #52 on: March 14, 2020, 19:33 »
+1
Also in lockdown in Spain, it's bonkers how serious it's suddenly got. No going out unless completely necessary.
Just got to sit it out and try to slow it down as much as poss for the health services to be able to cope. And put up with a bored teenager in house ::)
I hope UK closes schools etc down soon. In the beginning I thought they were right about waiting but now I think they need to and quickly.
I don't have the option of staying in, I share the care of my chairbound mother with my sister. I live c40 miles away (two trains and a bus in each direction), she lives c25 miles away. Although she has carers going in four times a day, we are really worried about what will happen if there's a lockdown - the carers don't do e.g. food shopping, washing (of which there is a full load, almost every day), emptying bins etc.
Of course, we don't want to catch the disease and spread it to her, or anyone else, during the incubation period, . Footbumps, no hugs, and blown kisses.

If they close down schools etc, who will look after the children of health / care workers? Some may live near family who are able and willing to help, some may not. So do they stay off their vital work to look after their kids, or informally make arrangements for them to be looked after in groups?
I'm glad I'm not making these decisions. I think there is a case for the concept of 'herd immunity' to prevent a major re-infection next winter, and for slowing down the virus so that the health services can cope with the most vulnerable. But there are so many factors to consider, and the scientists are still learning how this virus behaves. And I am not a scientist.
Sorry to hear your problems Sue. Give your mother a big wide smile from me the next time you see her and tell her she has hundreds of MSGers thinking of her :)

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #53 on: March 14, 2020, 19:58 »
+1
Also in lockdown in Spain, it's bonkers how serious it's suddenly got. No going out unless completely necessary.
Just got to sit it out and try to slow it down as much as poss for the health services to be able to cope. And put up with a bored teenager in house ::)
I hope UK closes schools etc down soon. In the beginning I thought they were right about waiting but now I think they need to and quickly.
I don't have the option of staying in, I share the care of my chairbound mother with my sister. I live c40 miles away (two trains and a bus in each direction), she lives c25 miles away. Although she has carers going in four times a day, we are really worried about what will happen if there's a lockdown - the carers don't do e.g. food shopping, washing (of which there is a full load, almost every day), emptying bins etc.
Of course, we don't want to catch the disease and spread it to her, or anyone else, during the incubation period, . Footbumps, no hugs, and blown kisses.

If they close down schools etc, who will look after the children of health / care workers? Some may live near family who are able and willing to help, some may not. So do they stay off their vital work to look after their kids, or informally make arrangements for them to be looked after in groups?
I'm glad I'm not making these decisions. I think there is a case for the concept of 'herd immunity' to prevent a major re-infection next winter, and for slowing down the virus so that the health services can cope with the most vulnerable. But there are so many factors to consider, and the scientists are still learning how this virus behaves. And I am not a scientist.
Sorry to hear your problems Sue. Give your mother a big wide smile from me the next time you see her and tell her she has hundreds of MSGers thinking of her :)

Thanks, it's not really a problem for me.  :) There must be thousands like my Mum who would be very seriously impacted in the event of a shutdown (and also she's be seriously impacted if she caught the virus, it's a real dilemma). It's just that when people say, 'we need a shutdown, think of the most vulnerable', they're not actually thinking about the needs of the most vulnerable.

« Reply #54 on: March 14, 2020, 23:39 »
0
I found this site on the Coronavirus by country. It show in graphs the number of the infected , if you hit the country you are interested in . The scary part is not the number of infected in USA but the rate of infection by dates. In USA the numbers are quite low. I think early today they listed 2600 infected in America. The rate for America is doubling about every three days if you look at the graphs. If that rate in America continues it will a big,big problem. https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

« Reply #55 on: March 15, 2020, 01:15 »
0
Also in lockdown in Spain, it's bonkers how serious it's suddenly got. No going out unless completely necessary.
Just got to sit it out and try to slow it down as much as poss for the health services to be able to cope. And put up with a bored teenager in house ::)
I hope UK closes schools etc down soon. In the beginning I thought they were right about waiting but now I think they need to and quickly.
I don't have the option of staying in, I share the care of my chairbound mother with my sister. I live c40 miles away (two trains and a bus in each direction), she lives c25 miles away. Although she has carers going in four times a day, we are really worried about what will happen if there's a lockdown - the carers don't do e.g. food shopping, washing (of which there is a full load, almost every day), emptying bins etc.
Of course, we don't want to catch the disease and spread it to her, or anyone else, during the incubation period, . Footbumps, no hugs, and blown kisses.

If they close down schools etc, who will look after the children of health / care workers? Some may live near family who are able and willing to help, some may not. So do they stay off their vital work to look after their kids, or informally make arrangements for them to be looked after in groups?
I'm glad I'm not making these decisions. I think there is a case for the concept of 'herd immunity' to prevent a major re-infection next winter, and for slowing down the virus so that the health services can cope with the most vulnerable. But there are so many factors to consider, and the scientists are still learning how this virus behaves. And I am not a scientist.
Sorry to hear your problems Sue. Give your mother a big wide smile from me the next time you see her and tell her she has hundreds of MSGers thinking of her :)

Thanks, it's not really a problem for me.  :) There must be thousands like my Mum who would be very seriously impacted in the event of a shutdown (and also she's be seriously impacted if she caught the virus, it's a real dilemma). It's just that when people say, 'we need a shutdown, think of the most vulnerable', they're not actually thinking about the needs of the most vulnerable.
It's a really difficult one. I feel for you as it must be a real worry. The lockdown counts those visits for caring for people as essential but I can understand that you might be left without the carers. My side is different, my parents in the UK both have heart problems and my dad is waiting on an emergency op - it's a real danger to them if they the catch it. My daughter is at college there and lives with them so I guess i am thinking selfishly of them. 
The risk is that the health service gets overloaded and people can't be treated, which would mostly be the vulnerable.
If it's slowed down there is less sudden strain on everything. It's still going to be massively tough though no matter what.

Financially it's going to be a disaster! I am self employed but working from home is not an option. Apart from microstock, hahahahahahaha:)
People here are helping each other out as much as poss which is a good thing. I hope things don't become more difficult for you Sue than they already must be.
 :)

« Reply #56 on: March 15, 2020, 02:34 »
+2
Politics, economy, markets, is for later. The sooner you understand the sooner you think about not putting the person in front at risk. Now, nothing else matters but stopping the contagion. In a few days, what you know, your routine will disappear, your life will not be the same. It will be seen if there are cruises and sales when the epidemic expires, but now, don't infect anyone is the goal, not infect anyone. Do it for others. Each must be responsible for not infecting the rest.


Tenebroso
From Spain.






Edited to wish everyone luck. Lots, lots, lots of luck.

I subscribe to every single word of Tenebroso. I write from Italy and, although the country has been closed for 6 days now, in the most affected region (Lombardy), cases increase at the impressive rate of 1500 per day. Intensive care beds are about to end up in that region and, for some days now, doctors say that they will soon be forced to choose who to treat and who to let die. The only way to stop the exponential growth of the virus is to stay home, stay home, stay home. I am very worried about my English friends, who have been faced with a disastrous hypothesis. Why? Because there is no scientific evidence regarding the fact that, once cured of the virus, one cannot be infected again. Herd immunity theory, in this case, is a really dangerous gamble.
If your government has not yet taken drastic measures such as here in Italy, Spain and France, be yourselves to take all necessary precautions: if you can work from home, do it; ALWAYS keep a distance of at least one meter from the people you talk to, wash your hands as often as you can and properly.
You get used to quarantine quickly, less quickly you will get used to seeing scenes like those of a city in northern Italy, in which, in these days, a burial is carried out every half hour.
For God's sake, stay home!

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #57 on: March 15, 2020, 08:05 »
0
Also in lockdown in Spain, it's bonkers how serious it's suddenly got. No going out unless completely necessary.
Just got to sit it out and try to slow it down as much as poss for the health services to be able to cope. And put up with a bored teenager in house ::)
I hope UK closes schools etc down soon. In the beginning I thought they were right about waiting but now I think they need to and quickly.
I don't have the option of staying in, I share the care of my chairbound mother with my sister. I live c40 miles away (two trains and a bus in each direction), she lives c25 miles away. Although she has carers going in four times a day, we are really worried about what will happen if there's a lockdown - the carers don't do e.g. food shopping, washing (of which there is a full load, almost every day), emptying bins etc.
Of course, we don't want to catch the disease and spread it to her, or anyone else, during the incubation period, . Footbumps, no hugs, and blown kisses.

If they close down schools etc, who will look after the children of health / care workers? Some may live near family who are able and willing to help, some may not. So do they stay off their vital work to look after their kids, or informally make arrangements for them to be looked after in groups?
I'm glad I'm not making these decisions. I think there is a case for the concept of 'herd immunity' to prevent a major re-infection next winter, and for slowing down the virus so that the health services can cope with the most vulnerable. But there are so many factors to consider, and the scientists are still learning how this virus behaves. And I am not a scientist.

They can keep schools open just to look after all the essential service workers children. I don't get herd immunity. Seems like a good idea until you combine it with herd mentality. People aren't going to do what the government wants, as we've seen with almost all sport being cancelled. Getting a lot of people infected is going to cause a panic. One of those ideas that works well in theory but they are already seeing it fails in practice. It also seems to be the opposite way almost all the other worlds leading scientists are advising. So many scientists are working flat out on this, they may well have better treatments for the outbreak after this one and they will know much more about what they're dealing with.

Herd immunity is a form of immunity that occurs when the vaccination of a significant portion of a population (or herd) provides a measure of protection for individuals who have not developed immunity.

I don't know who's saying, let everyone catch the disease and that will prevent the spread, that makes absolutely no sense. There is no vaccine.

About the question, health care people, closing schools, at who's going to take care of the others. Locally a couple people have already volunteered to keep others children, with their own, during work hours, because daycare and schools have been closed. People helping others, in a time of need.

Which is the opposite of why we see empty store shelves as people panic and stockpile paper goods, and canned soup. I also see all the frozen bread is sold out, along with paper towels and facial tissues.

Valerie works health care, taking care of older people in home. The workers are now having their temperature taken at the entrance, every time they come in.

Just hitting the USA, watch the numbers climb this week. Hopefully the statistics for Europe will start to taper off soon.


« Reply #58 on: March 15, 2020, 13:31 »
+6
Just saw that numbers in Italy went up again and the situation is not looking good in whole Europe in general. 

Wishing good luck to everyone and stay home, stay safe as much as you can and lets hope the amplitude will hit the top very soon.

 


« Reply #59 on: March 15, 2020, 19:55 »
+2
Also in lockdown in Spain, it's bonkers how serious it's suddenly got. No going out unless completely necessary.
Just got to sit it out and try to slow it down as much as poss for the health services to be able to cope. And put up with a bored teenager in house ::)
I hope UK closes schools etc down soon. In the beginning I thought they were right about waiting but now I think they need to and quickly.
I don't have the option of staying in, I share the care of my chairbound mother with my sister. I live c40 miles away (two trains and a bus in each direction), she lives c25 miles away. Although she has carers going in four times a day, we are really worried about what will happen if there's a lockdown - the carers don't do e.g. food shopping, washing (of which there is a full load, almost every day), emptying bins etc.
Of course, we don't want to catch the disease and spread it to her, or anyone else, during the incubation period, . Footbumps, no hugs, and blown kisses.

If they close down schools etc, who will look after the children of health / care workers? Some may live near family who are able and willing to help, some may not. So do they stay off their vital work to look after their kids, or informally make arrangements for them to be looked after in groups?
I'm glad I'm not making these decisions. I think there is a case for the concept of 'herd immunity' to prevent a major re-infection next winter, and for slowing down the virus so that the health services can cope with the most vulnerable. But there are so many factors to consider, and the scientists are still learning how this virus behaves. And I am not a scientist.

They can keep schools open just to look after all the essential service workers children. I don't get herd immunity. Seems like a good idea until you combine it with herd mentality. People aren't going to do what the government wants, as we've seen with almost all sport being cancelled. Getting a lot of people infected is going to cause a panic. One of those ideas that works well in theory but they are already seeing it fails in practice. It also seems to be the opposite way almost all the other worlds leading scientists are advising. So many scientists are working flat out on this, they may well have better treatments for the outbreak after this one and they will know much more about what they're dealing with.

Herd immunity is a form of immunity that occurs when the vaccination of a significant portion of a population (or herd) provides a measure of protection for individuals who have not developed immunity.

I don't know who's saying, let everyone catch the disease and that will prevent the spread, that makes absolutely no sense. There is no vaccine.

About the question, health care people, closing schools, at who's going to take care of the others. Locally a couple people have already volunteered to keep others children, with their own, during work hours, because daycare and schools have been closed. People helping others, in a time of need.

Which is the opposite of why we see empty store shelves as people panic and stockpile paper goods, and canned soup. I also see all the frozen bread is sold out, along with paper towels and facial tissues.

Valerie works health care, taking care of older people in home. The workers are now having their temperature taken at the entrance, every time they come in.

Just hitting the USA, watch the numbers climb this week. Hopefully the statistics for Europe will start to taper off soon.
The scientists that the pathetic UK government are listening to were talking about herd immunity. The theory is that all countries that have a lock down now, will be in trouble when a second wave hits, as too few will of developed an immunity, from having the virus. They don't mind that the first wave could wipe a lot of us out. Thankfully, most of the big mass gatherings, like football matches, were called off, against the governments policy. Now the UK government is changing its tune but I have zero confidence in them.

« Reply #60 on: March 16, 2020, 03:13 »
+1
The UK government is being dragged along by events and at least a week behind the curve. Individuals and even businesses are acting more responsibly than the govt. The UK used to be good at this stuff. The home sectretary should be protecting us...shes nowhere to be seen..........

« Reply #61 on: March 16, 2020, 04:15 »
+11
I've just read the news that Donald Trump, the US president, tried to secure the exclusive for the coronavirus vaccine to the United States, making it unavailable to the rest of the world!  :o

The vaccine is being developed (soon to be tested in humans) by a German company, and after the refusal of the company to give the US the exclusive, Trump tried to buy the company.

The German ministry of Health already commented on the issue declaring that when a vaccine is developed it will be for the whole world and that the company is safe.

This action by Trump, trying to prevent the world to access a cure securing it just for the US is beyond anything I thought possible and places Trump among the likes of Adolph Hitler.

I consider this an act of war and attempted genocide and I would completely support isolation and heavy sanctions against the US, while this monster, or another one like him elected by the Americans, is in office.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #62 on: March 16, 2020, 06:19 »
+2
I've just read the news that Donald Trump, the US president, tried to secure the exclusive for the coronavirus vaccine to the United States, making it unavailable to the rest of the world!  :o

The vaccine is being developed (soon to be tested in humans) by a German company, and after the refusal of the company to give the US the exclusive, Trump tried to buy the company.
How come is it that with each new bit of info which comes out about Trump, I still think, "this must be fake news".
I do apologise, it's only too real.

Quote
The German ministry of Health already commented on the issue declaring that when a vaccine is developed it will be for the whole world and that the company is safe.

This action by Trump, trying to prevent the world to access a cure securing it just for the US is beyond anything I thought possible and places Trump among the likes of Adolph Hitler.

I consider this an act of war and attempted genocide and I would completely support isolation and heavy sanctions against the US, while this monster, or another one like him elected by the Americans, is in office.
His followers will just say he's making good on his promise to keep America First (and to Hell with the rest of us).

« Reply #63 on: March 16, 2020, 06:37 »
0
I just checked my numbers for the first half of the month... It's actually pretty good. I made more money during the past 15 days than during the whole month of February (that was a bad month), and I'm $2 away from my March 2019 performance.

Important to mention: I'm mainly editorial.

I'm monitoring carefully SS, as it's the main channel, and even the recent pictures are getting sales.

The news are constantly changing, so there's a huge demand on anything that could be related to coronavirus, even from far away. As I was mentioning before, crowds on pedestrian streets, law enforcement and first aid related content, typical pictures from the most hit places (if you have previously been to Iran, Italy or Spain, it's time to massively upload), public transportation and commuters, etc. There's a market at the moment.

If the economy goes into recession, it won't last, of course, but there's at the moment a market, so it can be a good idea to make some cash provisions before something financially nasty happens.

« Reply #64 on: March 16, 2020, 06:45 »
0
I've just read the news that Donald Trump, the US president, tried to secure the exclusive for the coronavirus vaccine to the United States, making it unavailable to the rest of the world!  :o

The vaccine is being developed (soon to be tested in humans) by a German company, and after the refusal of the company to give the US the exclusive, Trump tried to buy the company.
How come is it that with each new bit of info which comes out about Trump, I still think, "this must be fake news".
I do apologise, it's only too real.

Quote
The German ministry of Health already commented on the issue declaring that when a vaccine is developed it will be for the whole world and that the company is safe.

This action by Trump, trying to prevent the world to access a cure securing it just for the US is beyond anything I thought possible and places Trump among the likes of Adolph Hitler.

I consider this an act of war and attempted genocide and I would completely support isolation and heavy sanctions against the US, while this monster, or another one like him elected by the Americans, is in office.
His followers will just say he's making good on his promise to keep America First (and to Hell with the rest of us).

Well the news appeared on a reference newspaper of my country (Western Europe), also in the Guardian, NYT, etc.

« Reply #65 on: March 16, 2020, 10:49 »
0
I've just read the news that Donald Trump, the US president, tried to secure the exclusive for the coronavirus vaccine to the United States, making it unavailable to the rest of the world!  :o

The vaccine is being developed (soon to be tested in humans) by a German company, and after the refusal of the company to give the US the exclusive, Trump tried to buy the company.

The German ministry of Health already commented on the issue declaring that when a vaccine is developed it will be for the whole world and that the company is safe.

This action by Trump, trying to prevent the world to access a cure securing it just for the US is beyond anything I thought possible and places Trump among the likes of Adolph Hitler.

I consider this an act of war and attempted genocide and I would completely support isolation and heavy sanctions against the US, while this monster, or another one like him elected by the Americans, is in office.

Nothing new...american govs have always acted this way...financial first,no matter if there will be deaths...you won't find any state with no petrol or a strategic position where americans go to war in the name of a fake democracy....it says all...

« Reply #66 on: March 17, 2020, 06:10 »
+3
It is 6% on closed cases, but the mortality rate is calculated on open and closed cases, so it's 3.66% currently. If they just calculated it using closed cases, and only one person had died but nobody had yet recovered... the mortality rate would be 100%.

And also doesn't take into account all those who've had it but not tested. There is a large volume of people who get it and have zero symptoms and never realise they've had it. That is one of the reasons it is important to develop a test that determines whether you've had it rather than the current tests which can only tell you whether you have it now.


« Reply #67 on: March 17, 2020, 06:29 »
+3
The UK government is being dragged along by events and at least a week behind the curve. Individuals and even businesses are acting more responsibly than the govt. The UK used to be good at this stuff. The home sectretary should be protecting us...shes nowhere to be seen..........

The ones protecting us are the experts providing the government the advice, who happen to be leaders in the field of viral diseases. I trust them over you or I and we certainly don't know what's going on behind the scenes. I'd rather not see every Tom, Dick or Harry every 2 minutes repeating the same message, better that we see only the PM and the 2 experts for a daily Q & A while Ministers and experts work flat out behind the scenes sorting stuff out rather than sat in front of a TV camera.

Each and every country will be faced with a different set of problems that has to be balanced. There is zero point in comparing the requirements / response of one nation to another as borders, population balance, infrastructure and resources will all differ. Meanwhile, the media is doing a great job whipping up a frenzy of panic by quoting part statements that are misleading or, don't provide the full picture just to get views on their webpages and increase advertising revenue.

As far as business goes, SS is a little quieter but AS is doing really well this month.

« Reply #68 on: March 17, 2020, 08:51 »
0
Massive tests.
Massive lockdown.

And total isolation of countries which have not adopted these measures.

georgep7

« Reply #69 on: March 17, 2020, 09:00 »
0
....
« Last Edit: March 17, 2020, 22:39 by georgep7 »

« Reply #70 on: March 17, 2020, 09:12 »
+1
People & politicians = Contributors & stock agencies.

The EU used to be the best place to live in. Now we are all too cool I think.

« Reply #71 on: March 17, 2020, 09:19 »
+1
Maybe Boris and others like him should think twice some things:

https://elpais.com/espana/madrid/2020-03-17/al-menos-19-muertos-en-una-residencia-de-ancianos-de-madrid-por-el-brote-de-coronavirus.html

Coronavirus kills 19 in ONE nursing home. More expected to die.

« Reply #72 on: March 17, 2020, 09:43 »
+1
Maybe Boris and others like him should think twice some things:

https://elpais.com/espana/madrid/2020-03-17/al-menos-19-muertos-en-una-residencia-de-ancianos-de-madrid-por-el-brote-de-coronavirus.html

Coronavirus kills 19 in ONE nursing home. More expected to die.

That's why the elderly have to be protected, they're the most at risk. It's why the UK have stated no unnecessary Nursing Home visits and elderly (over 70) to self isolated after the weekend. We all love our parents and grandparents and wold love to see them but that love could kill them.

I've already made sure they know how to use FaceTime on the iPad so we can see and talk to them. It's not the same as going their but, we all have a responsibility. Not see them for 2-3 months is not as bad as never seeng them again!


« Reply #73 on: March 17, 2020, 09:52 »
+4
be sure trump putin and boris mother won't die....ahaha...politicians should be hanged on a bridge...especially these one

There are a lot of politicians I dislike, but I've never stooped as low as wishing someone dead... The hate that radiates from you reflects more on you than the people you dislike.

georgep7

« Reply #74 on: March 17, 2020, 10:04 »
0
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« Last Edit: March 17, 2020, 22:38 by georgep7 »


 

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