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Author Topic: Flyer for shooting stock images with kids, help appreciated.  (Read 3188 times)

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« on: October 14, 2013, 11:22 »
0
Hi everyone,

I live in an area where we have tons of small kids and young families.

I don't want to go the classic way, shoot clients offering prints etc. I would like to offer them free shooting for signing a model release. I want to make it very clear. So they understand what they are signing, but not too offending. We have one big playground with advertisement board, where I would like to put there some kind of flyer and then follow up with personal meeting.

Does anyone have any tips for the right wording that you tried and it worked.

I don't want to use word free, as in fact it is not free, it is trade, I'm giving them photos and online gallery, they are giving me release?

Thanks for any  tips.


« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2013, 11:43 »
0
I think if you do it this way, you will end up to make someone unhappy.. that's why usually it is easier to get models, at least you paid and no trouble.

I will feel strange that I see my photos end up in some place but i got nothing real return.

even a friend or relatives may think you are taking their advantages i guess.

Hi everyone,

I live in an area where we have tons of small kids and young families.

I don't want to go the classic way, shoot clients offering prints etc. I would like to offer them free shooting for signing a model release. I want to make it very clear. So they understand what they are signing, but not too offending. We have one big playground with advertisement board, where I would like to put there some kind of flyer and then follow up with personal meeting.

Does anyone have any tips for the right wording that you tried and it worked.

I don't want to use word free, as in fact it is not free, it is trade, I'm giving them photos and online gallery, they are giving me release?

Thanks for any  tips.

« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2013, 11:51 »
0
You can try. Over the years, I've discover that is cheaper to pay for models (more session time for your --and not theirs-- photos, less time editing non-selleable book protraits etc), but I've discovered too that there are many people who's thrilled with the idea of seeing their (or their's sons) photos in print on some ad. Putting and ad is the way for find these people. Juts be clear; what you give, what you take.

« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2013, 13:09 »
0
I think if you do it this way, you will end up to make someone unhappy.. that's why usually it is easier to get models, at least you paid and no trouble.

I will feel strange that I see my photos end up in some place but i got nothing real return.

even a friend or relatives may think you are taking their advantages i guess.

I understand it is somehow double edge sword this way, the thing is, as loop said lot of people like to have kids in ads and here don't care about it too much, and lot of them want to have a picture well made, and they don't want to pay big money for it.
But you gave me an idea, maybe I can make flyer "kid models wanted" and offer to pay them, and if they decide they love the images, I can offer them prints and have the money back.

Hmmm, it is sensitive area, when you are talking about kids :/ any other tips ?

« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2013, 16:38 »
+1
You may want to include the words "advertising model" so that people know right away that these aren't fashion shoots.

Good luck!

« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2013, 14:49 »
0
I closed my  high-end studio of 22 years in 2002 to "retire". I decided to try microstock a year and a half ago and trading THEIR services as a "PHOTO-ACTOR" is the only way I've gotten models. It has worked fantastic for me; but a lot may depend on your approach and personality. If I meet someone (on a walk, at an
event, or even just friends of friends) that I think would be good for a stock photo situation (or just like their "looks") I explain everything up front. I can't pay them, but they will get professional photos from the shoot. I take the best ones (that I think they'd like) and either email them the jpegs or give them hard 5x7 prints in exchange for their SERVICES. I explain what I'm doing technically during the shoot and what the "story" is. People LOVE seeing what goes on "behind the scenes". They become involved in the process, sometimes come up with additional situations and ideas, and really enjoy learning about photography. I even joked with one senior working in her garden that she might show up in a billboard saying "With Depends, I can garden all day" She thought that was hilarious. After every shoot, people say what a good time they had and that I should call them again anytime. This has been my experience with seniors, couples, and parents of young children. Oddly enough, they think a couple of 5x7s (not even the files, sometimes) are great. But again, this approach probably depends on where you live and what your approach and personality is. I have a very small portfolio, but have a high percentage of sales.
I do believe in quality over quantity (since keywording, categorizing, scanning and uploading releases, and images is labor intensive and time-consuming)
That's how I got all the models here http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-779257p1.html

« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2013, 15:35 »
0
Jamie it must be flying ;D

lisafx

« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2013, 15:48 »
0
Great portfolio Jamie.  Your method is obviously working for you :)

To the OP,  I would honestly be very careful about posting flyers in playgrounds and asking strangers to let their kids model for you.  People are VERY protective of their kids, and if they are strangers they are likely to be very angry and possibly litigious if they find a photo used in a way they don't like. 

I find that working with the kids of friends of mine,  who know what I do and understand all the possible uses, is much better.  There is a level of trust and comfort there that would not be present with kids recruited from a playground. 

I always give a full cd of every image taken, along with a "permission to print" letter they can take to Walgreens, CVS, or wherever to have their prints done, and usually a Toys R Us giftcard for $25 or so for the model(s). 

And of course paying "professional" child models is a great option, but tough to afford on a microstock budget. 

Ron

« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2013, 05:53 »
0
Lisa, could you share your permission to print letter with me maybe? If not, no worries. I can PM you my email if you want.  Thank you.

« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2013, 06:13 »
0
I closed my  high-end studio of 22 years in 2002 to "retire". I decided to try microstock a year and a half ago and trading THEIR services as a "PHOTO-ACTOR" is the only way I've gotten models. It has worked fantastic for me; but a lot may depend on your approach and personality. If I meet someone (on a walk, at an
event, or even just friends of friends) that I think would be good for a stock photo situation (or just like their "looks") I explain everything up front. I can't pay them, but they will get professional photos from the shoot. I take the best ones (that I think they'd like) and either email them the jpegs or give them hard 5x7 prints in exchange for their SERVICES. I explain what I'm doing technically during the shoot and what the "story" is. People LOVE seeing what goes on "behind the scenes". They become involved in the process, sometimes come up with additional situations and ideas, and really enjoy learning about photography. I even joked with one senior working in her garden that she might show up in a billboard saying "With Depends, I can garden all day" She thought that was hilarious. After every shoot, people say what a good time they had and that I should call them again anytime. This has been my experience with seniors, couples, and parents of young children. Oddly enough, they think a couple of 5x7s (not even the files, sometimes) are great. But again, this approach probably depends on where you live and what your approach and personality is. I have a very small portfolio, but have a high percentage of sales.
I do believe in quality over quantity (since keywording, categorizing, scanning and uploading releases, and images is labor intensive and time-consuming)
That's how I got all the models here http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-779257p1.html


If you're going to take the time to secure models, either paid, or unpaid, you should make sure to make the most of your investment.  I see one image of a woman in the garden.  Most of your people images look like one off grabs where the release was an afterthought.  Use your pre-production time to create a theme that you can create many different planned captures from.


 

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