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Author Topic: France - regulations  (Read 4004 times)

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ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« on: March 26, 2012, 07:53 »
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I'm deciding which LC concert to go to, and at the moment I'm leaning towards Paris. The idea is to stay a couple of extra days shooting editorial - the last time I did this (not in Paris) the trip has almost paid for itself already via Alamy.
But I know there are specific rules to France about shooting where people might be incidentally in the photo.
Can anyone point me to the actual regulations, even if in French?


« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2012, 08:33 »
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What or who is LC?

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2012, 08:45 »
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What or who is LC?
Leonard Cohen, the clue's in the sig; but that wasn't stock-related.

« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2012, 09:17 »
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Thanks. Everyday you learn something new.  :)

« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2012, 09:37 »
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If you read french you may find an extended answer here
http://www.dolphin2001.net/photo/legis/droit/

Jean

« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2012, 09:42 »
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ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2012, 10:10 »
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Thanks.
This would seem to be the relevant sentence:
"With the passage of the Presumption of Innocence and Rights of Victims legislation in 2001, the publication of any photograph of a person without their express consent is prohibited in France. This applies to all photography, and is irrespective of editorial or artistic or personal or advertising use."
Pity, I would prefer to go to the Paris Olympia; it's relatively small and many of the other venues are out of doors, and I'm not a great soaking-wet fan.
Thanks for the info; that is as I understood it, just needed confirmation.

Added: irrelevant to my question, but i see that 4020 source sees England and 'the UK' as synonymous, which in legal matters, they're not.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2012, 10:13 by ShadySue »

« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2012, 14:05 »
0
Thanks.
This would seem to be the relevant sentence:
"With the passage of the Presumption of Innocence and Rights of Victims legislation in 2001, the publication of any photograph of a person without their express consent is prohibited in France. This applies to all photography, and is irrespective of editorial or artistic or personal or advertising use."
Pity, I would prefer to go to the Paris Olympia; it's relatively small and many of the other venues are out of doors, and I'm not a great soaking-wet fan.
Thanks for the info; that is as I understood it, just needed confirmation.

Added: irrelevant to my question, but i see that 4020 source sees England and 'the UK' as synonymous, which in legal matters, they're not.

Seems a bit overly restrictive IMO, but every democratic country has the right to set it's own rules based on the wishes of it's citizens.

  French newspapers and magazines must find it difficult on editorial matters. How does a French newspaper for instance depict a street scene with people  where obtaining consent is impractical or impossible?

« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2012, 18:11 »
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looks like this post was taken out of context - the law was passed over 10 years ago, and some searching on the net reveals it is oart of a law specficially designed to protect victims and those accused, but not convicted of crimes -- it came up again recently in the DSK case here in the US - you're not allowed to publish pictures of those who are arrested - goodbye perp walks & British tabloid frenzies

« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2012, 11:50 »
0
Thanks.
This would seem to be the relevant sentence:
"With the passage of the Presumption of Innocence and Rights of Victims legislation in 2001, the publication of any photograph of a person without their express consent is prohibited in France. This applies to all photography, and is irrespective of editorial or artistic or personal or advertising use."
Pity, I would prefer to go to the Paris Olympia; it's relatively small and many of the other venues are out of doors, and I'm not a great soaking-wet fan.
Thanks for the info; that is as I understood it, just needed confirmation.

That would only seem to apply to publication in France. The pictures could still be used elsewhere in the world without releases. It would be up to the publisher to ensure he has the correct releases in place in order to use the pictures.

I've been a huge Cohen fan since I heard his first album in 1967. He just released a new one, 'Old Ideas', in January.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2012, 18:41 »
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Sorry, forgot to get back on this one.
Thanks for the revised info. I've got my ticket and booked my flights and hotel.
Hallelujah  ;D
On Alamy it's possible to specify that a photo is not on sale in France; in any case as long as you say you have no releases, it's up to the buyer to know what they can and can't use in any particular context.

@ Les: The Old Ideas tour should be coming to North America; it's only a few of the European venues that have already been announced.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2012, 18:46 by ShadySue »


 

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