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Author Topic: Graphic designer claims credit for popular tees featuring stock illos  (Read 3758 times)

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Shelma1

« on: September 06, 2015, 11:53 »
+2
He just conveniently forgets to mention he licensed the illustrations from Shutterstock, but didn't even bother to pay for an extended license, which is what he needs to use the images on t-shirts. And then he copies the original illustrator's style (poorly) to create more t-shirt designs. But best of all, he claims he doesn't even know who these artists are, because that information isn't really available on the site. Where is he looking? The copyright info is right there.

http://www.heraldextra.com/entertainment/arts-and-theatre/visual/the-provo-rocks-t-shirts-were-originally-stock-images-are/article_690d70f4-de57-5da0-b8f8-cfd2debe9d8c.html


« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2015, 13:02 »
+4
Looks pretty open and shut per the SS terms.  They need to purchase at least 1 EL for all the designs.

« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2015, 13:40 »
+3
It looks like it is multiple artists too. I see Chromaco's eagle head in one of the designs as well and others look like multiple styles combined.

« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2015, 20:59 »
+8
Looks pretty open and shut per the SS terms.  They need to purchase at least 1 EL for all the designs.

At least. But this Nye person is an example of how wrong some people are.

If Im a person who sells things on stock image sites, Im basically saying Do whatever you want with this, Nye said. So to credit the illustrator would be unprecedented.

I didn't see anywhere when I signed up for Microstock saying I just gave up all rights and for 28 cents anybody could do whatever they wanted, with no credit or responsibility. Nye needs to get sued.

« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2015, 12:41 »
+1
By systematically devaluing the work of illustrators and photographers, the microstocks have created a climate that encourages this sort of thing. People now know that a photo is worth a few dollars at most - pennies, actually, if they buy a package-  so they don't even worry about the fine points of copyright and licensing.  Why would they believe 'artists' or agencies even care, with prices so low? 

Should the artist send a letter saying "I only got 35 cents, you owe me 5 bucks or you'll hear from my lawyer?"

 

« Last Edit: September 07, 2015, 12:57 by stockastic »

« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2015, 13:21 »
+1
If I were Angelloz I would open my own shop/line of T-shirts with news designs in the same line right now.

ShadySue

« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2015, 14:08 »
+4
Looks pretty open and shut per the SS terms.  They need to purchase at least 1 EL for all the designs.
Wonder why it's taking them so long to "investigate whether or not any rules were broken". I really wish the agencies would take a hard line on this sort of thing.

Shelma1

« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2015, 14:37 »
+2
Me too. If they're going to require you to inform them if you discover a violation, then it behooves them to follow up on it.

« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2015, 22:32 »
+1

« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2015, 13:22 »
+8
"While the team creates the ideas, it is Nye who draws the designs. Having an in-house artist has been a bonus, Norman said."

Good ol' Utah ... lol

« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2015, 10:44 »
+1
"While the team creates the ideas, it is Nye who draws the designs. Having an in-house artist has been a bonus, Norman said."

Good ol' Utah ... lol


Quick somebody fill your Zazzle shop with these.  http://www.heraldextra.com/news/local/central/provo/photos-provo-city-s-popular-t-shirts/collection_f20b66d5-520e-5641-8fb3-bd3f897751df.html#0

« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2015, 16:18 »
+10
These people really don't understand how licensing and copyright work or conveniently pretend that they don't. It's awful. I hope shutterstock stands behind the original designer and gets her the fees (and any penalty fees) she deserves.

« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2015, 23:29 »
+6
Being ignorant of licensing terms and the complexities of stock image licensing is one thing. Taking credit for creating an illustration when it's really stock is entirely different, and it sounds like this Creative Director was happy to take credit for designing these t-shirts until he got caught.

Sadly it happens a lot. I had an issue recently with a guy who claimed ownership of one of my stock images and tried to sign over the rights to it to a company. I also saw one of my stock graphics in a gift card design that was featured in a design magazine, and of course someone else's name was listed as the illustrator and designer. I'd rather see it go uncredited than to see someone else take the credit for it.

I'm not a copyright expert by any means, but to me it sort of feels like copyright infringement, not so much in terms of licensing but in the sense that someone misrepresented artwork that they didn't create themselves and implied ownership. It might not be the kind of thing that SS would do anything about, but it still infringes on the original artists' rights.

Hongover

« Reply #13 on: September 09, 2015, 23:44 »
+5
Some designers don't have a lot of integrity. They do it because of the competitive job environment and having popular pieces in your portfolio can mean the difference between getting a job and not getting one or getting a much higher salary. If their employer doesn't know, no one will be the wiser.

I think Brian Nye is a scumbag for what he did. He was getting praised left and right and he wasn't man enough to admit that it wasn't his designs/illustrations. He wanted his reputation to grow without anyone noticing his dirty deeds and, but it backfired on him and his reputation is damaged.

As a someone with a design background, I would never do such a thing. It's tempting to some designers because it does improve your reputation quite a bit.

« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2015, 17:23 »
+5
It's a shame the original artist doesn't get the credit for this they deserve. I don't think Shutterstock is going to do much about it. If they try to enforce it, they can get too much bad publicity - fears of what Getty was doing with their "Settlement Demand" letters that caused a lot of bad press and confused possible clients of the service. Maybe an EL for it, but that's it.

The artist (Olga Angelloz) should probably do this instead: Release a PR statement with her photo surrounded by her works. Something along the lines of "Meet the real artist behind the Provo Rocks T-shirts" - & how she was surprised and disappointed by not getting the credit she deserves. At the end of the statement - she should offer (for free or a low fee) a unique one of a kind design for a new Provo Rocks shirt for the city. (with her signature attached to the artwork) If she reaches out to the town they might do this to save face. In the end she can get her story out there, any Google search for "Provo Rocks" and her name should up, and earn some free publicity and get her work known. A win-win for everybody.

« Reply #15 on: September 10, 2015, 17:54 »
+3
I had this happen with one of my illustrations. The designer won a creative image award and all he did was slap the word "softball" on the illustration.

Shelma1

« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2015, 06:24 »
+1
It's a shame the original artist doesn't get the credit for this they deserve. I don't think Shutterstock is going to do much about it. If they try to enforce it, they can get too much bad publicity - fears of what Getty was doing with their "Settlement Demand" letters that caused a lot of bad press and confused possible clients of the service. Maybe an EL for it, but that's it.

The artist (Olga Angelloz) should probably do this instead: Release a PR statement with her photo surrounded by her works. Something along the lines of "Meet the real artist behind the Provo Rocks T-shirts" - & how she was surprised and disappointed by not getting the credit she deserves. At the end of the statement - she should offer (for free or a low fee) a unique one of a kind design for a new Provo Rocks shirt for the city. (with her signature attached to the artwork) If she reaches out to the town they might do this to save face. In the end she can get her story out there, any Google search for "Provo Rocks" and her name should up, and earn some free publicity and get her work known. A win-win for everybody.

You're so nice. I'm so mean. I think she should release a statement with her designs on her own t-shirts with her signature on them or even offer to sign them personally so people are buying autographed tees from the original artist. She should sell these designs on tees anyway, even without a press release...clearly people really like them.

I don't see a need for a creative director who took credit for her work to save face.


Shelma1

« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2015, 06:27 »
+3
I had this happen with one of my illustrations. The designer won a creative image award and all he did was slap the word "softball" on the illustration.

This is crazy. In awards books everyone involved in the project is credited. You should let the organization know it's your illustration. Congratulations...you won a design award! Put it on your rsum.

« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2015, 08:35 »
+1
I had this happen with one of my illustrations. The designer won a creative image award and all he did was slap the word "softball" on the illustration.

This is crazy. In awards books everyone involved in the project is credited. You should let the organization know it's your illustration. Congratulations...you won a design award! Put it on your rsum.

Thanks! I emailed them but never heard.

« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2015, 23:11 »
0
It's a shame the original artist doesn't get the credit for this they deserve. I don't think Shutterstock is going to do much about it. If they try to enforce it, they can get too much bad publicity - fears of what Getty was doing with their "Settlement Demand" letters that caused a lot of bad press and confused possible clients of the service. Maybe an EL for it, but that's it.

The artist (Olga Angelloz) should probably do this instead: Release a PR statement with her photo surrounded by her works. Something along the lines of "Meet the real artist behind the Provo Rocks T-shirts" - & how she was surprised and disappointed by not getting the credit she deserves. At the end of the statement - she should offer (for free or a low fee) a unique one of a kind design for a new Provo Rocks shirt for the city. (with her signature attached to the artwork) If she reaches out to the town they might do this to save face. In the end she can get her story out there, any Google search for "Provo Rocks" and her name should up, and earn some free publicity and get her work known. A win-win for everybody.

You're so nice. I'm so mean. I think she should release a statement with her designs on her own t-shirts with her signature on them or even offer to sign them personally so people are buying autographed tees from the original artist. She should sell these designs on tees anyway, even without a press release...clearly people really like them.

I don't see a need for a creative director who took credit for her work to save face.

Everybody should keep writing and linking that Brian Nye in a creative thief and takes credit for finding somebody's work on a micro site. No integrity at all. Brian Nye steals not just ideas but virtually the entire image.

Olga Angelloz should release an signature collection with her name under every designer. Like a designer collection. Start with big retail stores in Provo where there's a big demand. Kill the Provo thief glory with the real artists shirts.


 

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