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Poll

How much do you make per month from microstock?

0-100 ($)
48 (27.4%)
100-200 ($)
20 (11.4%)
200-400 ($)
24 (13.7%)
400-600 ($)
16 (9.1%)
600-1000($)
19 (10.9%)
>1000 ($)
21 (12%)
>2000($) ?
27 (15.4%)

Total Members Voted: 160

Author Topic: How much do you earn per month really????  (Read 43478 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« Reply #75 on: February 28, 2010, 17:25 »
0
This will be an ongoing battle till the end of time.  Its not just microstock, its everything that has a value.

The simple rule at play here is Supply and Demand.

If supply increases faster than demand, the value of the supply decreases.

Who is at fault?  Well, we all are.  Photographers, microstock photographers, camera companies, stock agencies, ...  That is why Unions were created, but that is always just a temporary measure.

What is the correct value?  There is no answer to this.  If people in the US can't make it cheap enough, maybe someone in another country can.  The stock photography supply is growing much faster than demand has or even will.  Again, whose fault is that?  As long as a dime can be made, someone will sell it.

Here is an example not related to apples:  When I was in school, Information Technology was on fire.  I had employers begging me to take jobs.  A friend and I opened a consulting company while in school for income.  Rates were great.  We could work just 10 hours a week to pay for school.  This went on for a while, then the economy took a hit.  Supply increased at a rate beyond demand.  Companies had to reduce workforce further adding to the supply of talented I/T consultants.  Rates dropped quickly to the point I stopped consulting.  I thought if I cant get $$$ dollars an hour its not worth it.  The supply continued, and jobs were now lost to offshore staffing companies for pennies on the dollar.  If we cant work that cheap, someone can.  Here we are today.

Ask yourself this.  When you go to the store, do you buy the product made in your country for $$ more, or do you by the product made in another country for $$ less?

Now make that product stock photography and make yourself an image buyer.

We are at a point in stock photography where a company spends more money finding an image than buying it.


« Reply #76 on: February 28, 2010, 17:35 »
0
There are two competing business models in play here - those who make money from creating and selling images, and those who make money selling advertising and referral links from blogging about it.

Both are legitimate ways to earn income and neither is necessarily morally superior to the other.  However, for the blogging/referral folks to make money, they need to sign up as many people as possible to COMPETE with the image makers. 

Surely it is not that hard to understand that the people whose LIVELIHOOD depends on selling images would be less than enthusiastic about encouraging or sharing information with the bloggers. 

It has nothing to do with wanting to be helpful to newbies, BTW.   I get sitemails from newbies often asking for tips on lighting, photoshop editing, etc. and have always tried to be helpful and encouraging.  And I have seen other experienced people here do the same - including the ones in this thread. 

It is one thing to help out a person who is really trying to learn, vs. providing blanket info to someone who is going to use that information to line their own pockets while simultaneously draining yours.

Like I said, nothing inherently wrong with making your money blogging about micro, just don't expect those that stand to lose out from your efforts to help you do it :)

quick question? are you talking about myself when saying making your money blogging?.. I will add again that I got 30$ from referrals, and I am at 1300$ in sales, around 1 year in stock!

« Reply #77 on: February 28, 2010, 17:49 »
0
Like I said, nothing inherently wrong with making your money blogging about micro, just don't expect those that stand to lose out from your efforts to help you do it :)
Well those anonymous contributor referral hunters are quite spammy and annoying on a forum like this. It's a pyramid scheme anyways that requires always more and more contributors. The agents are to blame since contributor referring is useless now that everybody with a cam and his brother already signed up. The agents then could raise our commission with the money they waste otherwise on contributor referral hunters.

Another thing is buyer referrals, which is much more sustainable as a business model and isn't at the expense of the creator. What's more, those people would leave this site alone then and hang out at buyer's or designer forums. It's the kind of blog that Slocke has: a buyers guide.

You could even think about a viable business model just referring buyers, without being a photographer yourself, if you offer some added value to the buyer.
In the tens of millions of images online, it will cost more and more time/$$ for buyers to find the right image, so you can do their image scouting if you are familiar with the different search engines. Somebody posted here a while ago buyers at the moment spend more $$ on finding images than on buying them, because of the price collapse of images.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2010, 18:01 by FD-amateur »

« Reply #78 on: February 28, 2010, 20:52 »
0
There are two competing business models in play here - those who make money from creating and selling images, and those who make money selling advertising and referral links from blogging about it.

Both are legitimate ways to earn income and neither is necessarily morally superior to the other.  However, for the blogging/referral folks to make money, they need to sign up as many people as possible to COMPETE with the image makers. 

Surely it is not that hard to understand that the people whose LIVELIHOOD depends on selling images would be less than enthusiastic about encouraging or sharing information with the bloggers. 

Funny, I was just trying to point this out to someone today...

« Reply #79 on: February 28, 2010, 21:08 »
0
If it was yesterday or before I wouldn't joined this forum! I am not enjoying staying here, I am sad about that, once I thinked that this would be a nice place to chat around about agencies etc.. and other stuff! but ok..

wish you all a great week!

« Reply #80 on: February 28, 2010, 21:28 »
0
There are two competing business models in play here - those who make money from creating and selling images, and those who make money selling advertising and referral links from blogging about it.

Both are legitimate ways to earn income and neither is necessarily morally superior to the other.  However, for the blogging/referral folks to make money, they need to sign up as many people as possible to COMPETE with the image makers. 

Surely it is not that hard to understand that the people whose LIVELIHOOD depends on selling images would be less than enthusiastic about encouraging or sharing information with the bloggers. 

It has nothing to do with wanting to be helpful to newbies, BTW.   I get sitemails from newbies often asking for tips on lighting, photoshop editing, etc. and have always tried to be helpful and encouraging.  And I have seen other experienced people here do the same - including the ones in this thread. 

It is one thing to help out a person who is really trying to learn, vs. providing blanket info to someone who is going to use that information to line their own pockets while simultaneously draining yours.

Like I said, nothing inherently wrong with making your money blogging about micro, just don't expect those that stand to lose out from your efforts to help you do it :)

Of course not those evil blogs, but what about forums?  It's not apples for sell in these banners.   ;)

SNP

  • Canadian Photographer
« Reply #81 on: February 28, 2010, 22:03 »
0
The time of stock is really really really over by now. Yuri Arcurs is sitting near McDonald's with a styrofoam cup, begging for cents. Really. Better get out. Nothing to see here. Move on. Really.  8)

speak for yourself ;-) but the time to start new in microstock seems to be gone...wouldn't want to be starting from scratch now and as sharply_done said earlier, the more invested you become, and ironically the more your income grows, the closer you keep your cards to your chest. that's the way it works. I used to give my istock cards out to everyone, including lots of photographers. I wish I could take them all back. I only give them to potential clients now. who wants more competition...no thanks. rotten apples for sale btw...
« Last Edit: February 28, 2010, 22:09 by hawk_eye »

« Reply #82 on: March 01, 2010, 03:26 »
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And here I was wondering where all the knockdown/drag out threads went.  ;D I guess you just have to hit a powder keg issue.

Personally, I don't worry about competition that much. I know all the work it took to get to where I am, so if someone else wants to do that, then they deserve a little success. I can also see where people are coming from about too many contributors. Some keywords are so diluted with "me too" copycat garbage that new good images with those keywords may never get seen.

But, I think that is the nature of the beast with the micros. Everyone was invited to the party. You knew that when you came, so it's kind of hard to complain about them when you get there.

Unless of course they ask for your income, which they intend to use to increase their own income and draw in yet more competition to an already crowded and dwindling market.  

Our income is really no ones business but our own. In polite society it is considered bad manners to ask a friend let alone someone you do not know well, how much money they make.  Especially if you intend on utilizing that financial info to encourage someone else to work for a share of that income.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2010, 06:19 by gbalex »

« Reply #83 on: March 01, 2010, 05:43 »
0
If the poll is right...so far 14% (14 out of 101) are making over $2000.00 a month which is more then I expected. Despite Yuri's thread gloomy outlook, microstock still look healthy. Who knows, maybe his port are loosing to the smaller ones. Denis

« Reply #84 on: March 01, 2010, 06:02 »
0
Despite Yuri's thread gloomy outlook, microstock still look healthy. Who knows, maybe his port are loosing to the smaller ones. Denis

Ofcourse it does. Buyers are still here. If Yuri loses sales, someone else gains them. This is pretty much the essence of economy. Also,(assuming the buying value stays the same) I think that if Yuri loses 1% of earnings that would translate into 100 young portfolios gaining 100% increase :).

« Reply #85 on: March 01, 2010, 06:05 »
0

Let me explain to you as easy as I can.I study management of business and the first thing that I learned in my 1st year was that no business exist without competition.

OK, so I have the only shop selling apples in my town. I'm doing just fine, everyone loves apples and they come to me to buy them (they have no choice). I exist happily for years. Then the guy down the road, seeing how well I'm doing, decides he's going to sell apples. He either has to sell better ones for the same price or the same ones cheaper. Either way, I'm screwed.

The World Bank has shafted the Developing World this way for at least four decades - "Oh look, X country grows coffee/tea/cocoa/fruit, you have to do it to or we won't lend to you". All that happens is a surplus is produced and the worldwide price drops.

Ask for your money back on that course.

(Of course, if I introduce a friend who shoots totally different things than me to microstock, I'm not shooting myself in the foot.  ;) )



Ok I see that you are thinking inside the box ...Lets see if I got this right...so you are the only one who sells apples right?That means that you can sell any apples you like it doesn't matter if the client likes them or not...You are the only one and the client has to buy from you...furthermore you can charge whatever you want for that apples ...for example let's say you got an apple for $1 and you sell it for $10(because you are the only one selling there no competition) so you make 10 times profit...ok all good but when the other guy decides to open his own store the picture has change...Now you have competition and you can't do what you like because you will go out of business! So you have 2 options 1)continue living in the box with no competition and go bankrupted OR struggle to have the freshest apples and with a good price....the I guarante you that the demand will be much bigger......Competition is good either way you look at it...if a new microstocker comes in and submiting the most eye catching images this world has ever seen what do you do?????Don't you try to perfect your self as much as you can? Don't get me wrong but thats business....you can't change anything...what ever you do there will always be competition ....and besides denying it you might as well look at the best part of competition

I would VOTE for you as new CEO of Getty and Istock - that way they'd grow better and faster!
Sure thing, if you ever get job there raise royalties for photographers at least to 50% ;-)

Good Luck!

P.S. Theory and reality are two completely different things!

« Reply #86 on: March 01, 2010, 06:32 »
0
Despite Yuri's thread gloomy outlook, microstock still look healthy. Who knows, maybe his port are loosing to the smaller ones. Denis

Ofcourse it does. Buyers are still here. If Yuri loses sales, someone else gains them. This is pretty much the essence of economy. Also,(assuming the buying value stays the same) I think that if Yuri loses 1% of earnings that would translate into 100 young portfolios gaining 100% increase :).

From the looks of the Microstock Poll Results in the top right hand margin I would say that your scenario is unlikely.  Sales seem to be down across the board for all sites in the Big 6, Up and Coming as well as the New Sites / Low Earners.  Those numbers are likely to be from a much larger segment of participants.

Positive thinking has its place, however I found that when you skirt reality, it tends to bite you in the end.

If you want to take sales from Yuri, I would think that your content and quality would have to be superior and you would have to shoot enough volume to be noticed on a daily basis. Many "young portfolios" produce low volume Yuri knock offs, that do not approach his quality.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2010, 11:49 by gbalex »

« Reply #87 on: March 01, 2010, 06:54 »
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The polls have several flaws including a small number of votes ; people, including me, vote relativity(top earning agency gets 10, 2nd gets 9, etc.. regardless of a drop or gain that doesn't effect the ladder) ; ratings don't reflect actual numbers(a 10 from a guy earning 100 a month is the same with a 10 earning 10000 a month).

You may be right about the general drop, however my first statement is still true: When someone loses, another one gains(it could be the agencies gaining though!).
Let's hope for the best.

« Reply #88 on: March 01, 2010, 07:03 »
0
Despite the earnings rating poll being all down, several BMEs and 2nd BMEs have been reported at SS and within this forum which put in doubt the accuracy of the poll rating. Denis
« Last Edit: March 01, 2010, 07:09 by cybernesco »

« Reply #89 on: March 01, 2010, 07:15 »
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The polls have several flaws including a small number of votes ; people, including me, vote relativity(top earning agency gets 10, 2nd gets 9, etc.. regardless of a drop or gain that doesn't effect the ladder) ; ratings don't reflect actual numbers(a 10 from a guy earning 100 a month is the same with a 10 earning 10000 a month).

You may be right about the general drop, however my first statement is still true: When someone loses, another one gains(it could be the agencies gaining though!).
Let's hope for the best.

If we were not in a global recession I would be more willing to agree with you.  However all of the graphic designers I know are telling me their clients are cutting back substantially, so they do not need as many images or vectors.  Two of my friends have lost most of their long term clients over the last year.  Just take a look at the unemployment figures and the condition of businesses in general. The empty business buildings across the globe do not inspire confidence that things will pick up anytime soon.

At what point will image volume outpace image demand permanently?   Some think it happened long ago, lets hope they are wrong.

Only the agencies could give us a real snap shot of sales volume. Most of the high quality, high volume shooters I know are reporting reduced sales and I tend to think that they are more representative of the big picture.  

« Reply #90 on: March 01, 2010, 07:24 »
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Despite the earnings rating poll being all down, several BMEs and 2nd BMEs have been reported at SS and within this forum which put in doubt the accuracy of the poll rating. Denis

;)  Is Fifi driving any of these BME's.  It is wise to consider who is reporting these sales figures, the recently stated RPI is dismal at best and there is no where to go but up. A 0.071 RPI may satisfy and inspire some.

There are of course shooters who will produce niche images that drive real sales volume no matter what the market conditions are. However they are not representative of the whole.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2010, 08:16 by gbalex »

macrosaur

    This user is banned.
« Reply #91 on: March 01, 2010, 08:08 »
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The supply continued, and jobs were now lost to offshore staffing companies for pennies on the dollar.  If we cant work that cheap, someone can.  Here we are today.

Don't worry, the same will happen with microstock : fresh indian, chinese, vietnamese, philipinos willing
to shoot for peanuts and flooding the market.


« Reply #92 on: March 01, 2010, 08:27 »
0
Despite the earnings rating poll being all down, several BMEs and 2nd BMEs have been reported at SS and within this forum which put in doubt the accuracy of the poll rating. Denis

;)  Is Fifi driving any of these BME's.  It is wise to consider who is reporting these sales figures, the recently stated RPI is dismal at best and there is no where to go but up. A 0.071 RPI may satisfy and inspire some.

There are of course shooters who will produce niche images that drive real sales volume no matter what the market conditions are. However they are not representative of the whole.

No not just Fifi...I compted 11 reported BMEs and 2nd BMEs at SS. Two reported BMEs in this forum. I had my 2nd BME last month. Most of them are not niche. My RPI is $1.60

« Reply #93 on: March 01, 2010, 08:37 »
0
Don't worry, the same will happen with microstock : fresh indian, chinese, vietnamese, philipinos willing
to shoot for peanuts and flooding the market.

True but are the indians, chinese etc. to blame? Or the governments who promoted consumerism to the level it is today?
I definitely wouldn't blame the people that can keep their costs low.

macrosaur

    This user is banned.
« Reply #94 on: March 01, 2010, 08:45 »
0
Don't worry, the same will happen with microstock : fresh indian, chinese, vietnamese, philipinos willing
to shoot for peanuts and flooding the market.

True but are the indians, chinese etc. to blame? Or the governments who promoted consumerism to the level it is today?
I definitely wouldn't blame the people that can keep their costs low.

it's just a matter of production costs : in these countries you can live fairly well with 300$/month.

all they need is a 500$ Canon Rebel and they can make a few thousand microstock
images and make a decent salary.

and written and spoken english by indians and philipinos is more than enough for keywording
as far as i've seen.

first they start with providing outsourced keywording and uploading, then they'll proceed
making the photos as well.

« Reply #95 on: March 01, 2010, 08:50 »
0
Yeah I know, my point is that they're not to blame that the people can make a good living with lower costs.
Luckily(or not) I live in a country where costs are lower(not 300$ a month low, but lower than western countries like the UK, Germany, etc.)

« Reply #96 on: March 01, 2010, 08:58 »
0
P.S. Theory and reality are two completely different things!

In this case even theory is wrong: asserting that competition is the best model is pure non-sense. In fact, there is no big company in the world which willingly runs its production in a competitive manner, by, for example, having two departments producing the same goods and then choosing the best one. Because it's horribly unproductive.

RT


« Reply #97 on: March 01, 2010, 09:08 »
0
Don't worry, the same will happen with microstock : fresh indian, chinese, vietnamese, philipinos willing
to shoot for peanuts and flooding the market.

Out of interest does anybody know how these folk are getting their images onto the sites, for the past three years the scaremongers have been shouting 'look out the Chinese are coming' I'm just wondering in they're doing a sponsored walk or something on their way to hand deliver their images to iS and SS HQ.

macrosaur

    This user is banned.
« Reply #98 on: March 01, 2010, 09:44 »
0
Don't worry, the same will happen with microstock : fresh indian, chinese, vietnamese, philipinos willing
to shoot for peanuts and flooding the market.

Out of interest does anybody know how these folk are getting their images onto the sites, for the past three years the scaremongers have been shouting 'look out the Chinese are coming' I'm just wondering in they're doing a sponsored walk or something on their way to hand deliver their images to iS and SS HQ.

china is a different beast.

for starters it's not easy to receive foreign payments with chinese banks like ICBC and BoC.
when i was living there i kept my european bank account and opened up also a HSBC one in HongKong
otherwise it can take weeks or month to receive money from overseas.

secondly, i've never met a single chinese photographer aware of the stock industry.

said that, indians and philipinos are well aware of stock, speak good enough english,
and have decent internet connectivity.

i'm afraid it's only a matter of time before the indians enter microstock by the front door.
they're already active in any possible outsourcing and IT/ICT services, as well as
data mining, keywording, spamming, scamming, blog farms, MFAs, fishing, affiliate marketing,
etc

helix7

« Reply #99 on: March 01, 2010, 10:53 »
0
If the poll is right...so far 14% (14 out of 101) are making over $2000.00 a month which is more then I expected. Despite Yuri's thread gloomy outlook, microstock still look healthy. Who knows, maybe his port are loosing to the smaller ones. Denis

Yes, but the poll only asks what you're making now. It's not so healthy if those making $2000 a month used to make $4000.


 

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