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Poll

How much do you make per month from microstock?

0-100 ($)
48 (27.4%)
100-200 ($)
20 (11.4%)
200-400 ($)
24 (13.7%)
400-600 ($)
16 (9.1%)
600-1000($)
19 (10.9%)
>1000 ($)
21 (12%)
>2000($) ?
27 (15.4%)

Total Members Voted: 160

Author Topic: How much do you earn per month really????  (Read 43255 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

RacePhoto

« Reply #150 on: March 02, 2010, 21:36 »
0
Here is a metaphor I have heard, "If you are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem."

I wonder why _you've_ heard it ... ;)

Haha, thanks.  I was waiting for someone to catch me on that.  Glad it was you.I have had many solutions, but not many of you all "making a living" have cared to join in.


Hey were you two separated at birth?



Wow I missed that one. Much better than the actual thread.  :o

Supply and demand, easy. But two SJLs or Brandons, that's it, I'm out of here.


SNP

  • Canadian Photographer
« Reply #151 on: March 02, 2010, 23:29 »
0

There's a pretty clear dividing line here. Those that make a significant part of their living out of this see the diminishing returns and bad treatment from agencies due to oversupply and realise their ability to feed themselves and their families is impaired by it.

Most of the people that are pro getting everyone onto the sinking ship seem to have the speedos barely ticking over under their names making me think they are probably the hobbyists. That or they just want to make a quick couple of bucks through referrals.

When your income depends on other people's success, through referrals or when it's a hobby or just a way to get a bit of extra cash doing what you enjoy it's far easier to be everyone's friend. I can fully understand it, I maybe would have been the same when this was just fun and games for me. If you take this seriously as a business and if you are ever lucky enough to do this for a job then you will think differently, believe me. It's just a shame that your actions now are decreasing your chances of ever being able to do that.

that sums it up for me...exactly...I started in microstock close to five years ago (and even that was almost missing the boat) with a naive, rose-coloured mentality. a couple of people set me straight early on, and not nicely either, but I'm glad they did. when I started it was with the intention of doing this seriously though, never as a hobby. frankly I wish hobbyists would just leave the bigger decisions to those of us doing this for a living. a bit harsh maybe, but it is what I think sometimes.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2010, 12:06 by hawk_eye »

« Reply #152 on: March 02, 2010, 23:47 »
0
I think someone in this thread asked for a definition of "newbie".

Here are some characteristic to recognize a "newbie":

1. They are microstock cheerleaders telling everyone how great this business is.
2. They still earn $0.25  at Shutterstock
3. They support Thinkstock.  And of course, they think $0.25 is ok! 
4. They do not yet qualify to be IS exclusive.  Even though it's only 250 images required.
5. They celebrate every single sale they make.
6. They make statistics with small numbers.

What else? Mmm... Ah!

7. They get angry when they read something they don't like.

 :)
« Last Edit: March 03, 2010, 01:25 by Digital66 »

Xalanx

« Reply #153 on: March 03, 2010, 03:39 »
0
I think someone in this thread asked for a definition of "newbie".

Here are some characteristic to recognize a "newbie":

1. They are microstock cheerleaders telling everyone how great this business is.
2. They still earn $0.25  at Shutterstock
3. They support Thinkstock.  And of course, they think $0.25 is ok! 
4. They do not yet qualify to be IS exclusive.  Even though it's only 250 images required.
5. They celebrate every single sale they make.
6. They make statistics with small numbers.

What else? Mmm... Ah!

7. They get angry when they read something they don't like.

 :)

Pretty good, indeed. Should be made sticky to this forum ;D

« Reply #154 on: March 03, 2010, 04:12 »
0
I think someone in this thread asked for a definition of "newbie".

Here are some characteristic to recognize a "newbie":

1. They are microstock cheerleaders telling everyone how great this business is.
2. They still earn $0.25  at Shutterstock
3. They support Thinkstock.  And of course, they think $0.25 is ok! 
4. They do not yet qualify to be IS exclusive.  Even though it's only 250 images required.
5. They celebrate every single sale they make.
6. They make statistics with small numbers.

What else? Mmm... Ah!

7. They get angry when they read something they don't like.

 :)


Pretty true, but for "They celebrate every single sale they make".  Like any drug you do need more and more. I mean, I need at least 3-4 a day to get me off!

And you my friend, no link to portflio . . . .?

macrosaur

    This user is banned.
« Reply #155 on: March 03, 2010, 04:21 »
0

can you define "newbie" in  3 or 4 comments?

anyone with less than 1000 saleable images.

macrosaur

    This user is banned.
« Reply #156 on: March 03, 2010, 04:27 »
0
I think someone in this thread asked for a definition of "newbie".

Here are some characteristic to recognize a "newbie":

1. They are microstock cheerleaders telling everyone how great this business is.
2. They still earn $0.25  at Shutterstock
3. They support Thinkstock.  And of course, they think $0.25 is ok! 
4. They do not yet qualify to be IS exclusive.  Even though it's only 250 images required.
5. They celebrate every single sale they make.
6. They make statistics with small numbers.

What else? Mmm... Ah!

7. They get angry when they read something they don't like.

 :)


hahaha

excellent !

« Reply #157 on: March 03, 2010, 07:55 »
0
Ok, I give up.

Fingers pointed: Newbies increasing supply; Helping newbies; blogs about microstock; referral links

Points addressed: Newbies are not the problem, the microstock crowd-sourcing model is; blogs/forums/ads market what the agencies are paying for, why are they the bad guys; you hate referral links yet you post all day on a site and increase its traffic that makes its income from referral links

I guess people are only part of a problem if they think they are part of the problem, until then its everyone else that is the problem.

Where are all the people "making a living" from microstock when Fotolia cut percentages?  Or moved levels?  Or when Dreamstime cut percentages?  Or when all the subs were introduced?  Or any of the other recent or past issues?

My finger pointing: If you think a growing supply is a problem (I can assure you the agencies do not), then the model is to blame.  The very reason microstock was started was to do exactly what you all are complaining about.  Every single person selling in this model (including me) is to blame.  Every person referring buyers and sellers to this model is to blame (including me).

Solutions?  Maybe agencies should shut the doors to newbies?  Maybe upload limits need to be closed more?  Maybe you should have at least 5000 images to get in?  Hmmm, but then that would not be microstock as we know it then would it?

Referrals?  Agencies buy more than images and video.  They also buy traffic.  Its pretty bold of someone to say they can sell their images but site owners cannot sell their traffic.  Its even bolder of them to actively participate on a site that does exactly that.

The fact is that referrals and newbies do increase supply.  Of course they do.  So do cheap DSLRs, Macro Photographers having to leave their model because micro has taken over, the internet, global economy, the world wide recession, your images, my images, that guy down the street's grandma's images...... come on!  Why beat the crowd with a club when you can work on fixing the gate?

I got starting on this because I am tired of seeing newbies bashed and blogs/forums blamed for the microstock industry's problems.  But its ok, I am done wasting my breath.  Maybe I will just provide a solution for the newbies.

Here is another perspective. I do not have a problem helping new submitters. However I do have a problem helping and watching long standing submitters take advantage of and utilize the vulnerabilities, inexperience and naivete of new submitters for their own financial gain.  The fact that the process "sometimes" harms the newcomers as well as long time submitters makes ignoring the situation hard to swallow. 

If we do not discuss industry challenges, how can we as a group take steps to become part of the solution by promoting a culture of ethical accountability?

We can build an ethical micostock culture by improving our own overall personal performance and passing on that professional expertise to others in our field who we see are also putting in the effort it takes to succeed in this business.  That culture would enable an environment of sustainable development for all of us.

If we ignore those who with open eyes are willing to base their business plans on exploiting the vulnerabilities of the industry as well as exploiting the newest inexperience individuals entering into it, knowing full well that they will be harming the industry as a whole, we have only ourselves to blame as the situation continues to deteriorate.

macrosaur

    This user is banned.
« Reply #158 on: March 03, 2010, 08:03 »
0
i disagree.

there's plenty of photo forums where the newbies can found hints about shooting better photos, selling photos, agencies, etc and finallt there's Flickr.

it's just too easy for newbie microstockers to get a foot in the door, to have critiques on their photos, to spy on other users' sales and views, to find any sort of help in forums and blogs.

the good thing about RM is that there's almost no help whatsover and to make a single sale it takes a long time and lots of images just to start.

this way there are no newbies around and the few ones who get in are dismayed by seeing no sales and then move to microstock.

« Reply #159 on: March 03, 2010, 08:16 »
0
I think someone in this thread asked for a definition of "newbie".

Here are some characteristic to recognize a "newbie":

1. They are microstock cheerleaders telling everyone how great this business is.
2. They still earn $0.25  at Shutterstock
3. They support Thinkstock.  And of course, they think $0.25 is ok! 
4. They do not yet qualify to be IS exclusive.  Even though it's only 250 images required.
5. They celebrate every single sale they make.
6. They make statistics with small numbers.

What else? Mmm... Ah!

7. They get angry when they read something they don't like.

 :)

I guess I am almost a no-newbie..! Left on 40$ on SS!

Then will you start talking with me properly??..

« Reply #160 on: March 03, 2010, 08:31 »
0

can you define "newbie" in  3 or 4 comments?

anyone with less than 1000 saleable images.

have you started RM with 1000 saleable images? microstock is just like photography, learning everyday and trying to make better photos etc.. so what is the problem of being a newbie? like I have always read from pros, is they saying that are building up a good and saleable portfolio!..

« Reply #161 on: March 03, 2010, 08:32 »
0
I think someone in this thread asked for a definition of "newbie".

Here are some characteristic to recognize a "newbie":

1. They are microstock cheerleaders telling everyone how great this business is.
2. They still earn $0.25  at Shutterstock
3. They support Thinkstock.  And of course, they think $0.25 is ok! 
4. They do not yet qualify to be IS exclusive.  Even though it's only 250 images required.
5. They celebrate every single sale they make.
6. They make statistics with small numbers.

What else? Mmm... Ah!

7. They get angry when they read something they don't like.

 :)


Pretty true, but for "They celebrate every single sale they make".  Like any drug you do need more and more. I mean, I need at least 3-4 a day to get me off!

And you my friend, no link to portflio . . . .?

nice question btw!

macrosaur

    This user is banned.
« Reply #162 on: March 03, 2010, 08:39 »
0

can you define "newbie" in  3 or 4 comments?

anyone with less than 1000 saleable images.

have you started RM with 1000 saleable images? microstock is just like photography, learning everyday and trying to make better photos etc.. so what is the problem of being a newbie? like I have always read from pros, is they saying that are building up a good and saleable portfolio!..

yes, i started with 500 images, as it was the norm years ago
and frankly i don't think it's so hard to make 500 good images if
you want to be a pro.

i can do it in few dats, while for a newbie it could take 1 year... to each his own.

« Reply #163 on: March 03, 2010, 08:40 »
0
I think someone in this thread asked for a definition of "newbie".

Here are some characteristic to recognize a "newbie":

1. They are microstock cheerleaders telling everyone how great this business is.
2. They still earn $0.25  at Shutterstock
3. They support Thinkstock.  And of course, they think $0.25 is ok! 
4. They do not yet qualify to be IS exclusive.  Even though it's only 250 images required.
5. They celebrate every single sale they make.
6. They make statistics with small numbers.

What else? Mmm... Ah!

7. They get angry when they read something they don't like.

 :)

I guess I am almost a no-newbie..! Left on 40$ on SS!

Then will you start talking with me properly??..

$40 to go.  Good for you.  I guess you are preparing a press release and a big party.  Though I don't think you will invite me.   ::)

macrosaur

    This user is banned.
« Reply #164 on: March 03, 2010, 08:43 »
0
so what is the problem of being a newbie? like I have always read from pros, is they saying that are building up a good and saleable portfolio!..

the problem with newbies is that they should stick to Flickr instead of polluting the pro's market
with their tiny portfolios.

pros and competition is more than welcome, but we should close the door to the horde of
1000s of newbies with 30-40 photos each.

and about learning : after a long time you reach a point where you know exactly what you're doing
so where's the problem in proving a few hundreds image to apply with an agency ?

there's nothing wrong in being a newbie, just don't dream of selling photos.
that's something pro do, not newbies.

macrosaur

    This user is banned.
« Reply #165 on: March 03, 2010, 08:45 »
0

$40 to go.  Good for you.  I guess you are preparing a press release and a big party.  Though I don't think you will invite me.   ::)

there.

exactly what i was trying to say.

anyone can make few good shots and make 40$ but this doesn't make you a pro.

when you'll make let's say 4000$/month with your photos then we'll talk about it.

« Reply #166 on: March 03, 2010, 08:56 »
0
I have never said that I would be a pro after this or that..! I am trying do create a portfolio that's it, while I am enjoying a lot doing it, which is bringing more color to my life (not the earnings, but the friends that come with it)

But like I said before, anyone can do this, of course, there will be a time that photos must be very good so it could bring earnings to another level.. I am very new to predict the future, but I cannot assure you that I won't give up easily!

like you said 4k would be to pros, I agree 100%, for now my aim is not that, because I know it is impossible, the main thing is doing a thing that brings something good to your own life, it is happening to me, when it doesn't I will leave!

regarding the party for SS, I won't do it of course, but I am doing a blog post, and it is the problem??.. It keep my track along the way since the beginning and I can call it also a competition between stock friends and so on, it is just a motivation, they are small goals, but like I said we gotta start with something!


« Reply #167 on: March 03, 2010, 09:24 »
0
so what is the problem of being a newbie? like I have always read from pros, is they saying that are building up a good and saleable portfolio!..

the problem with newbies is that they should stick to Flickr instead of polluting the pro's market
with their tiny portfolios.

pros and competition is more than welcome, but we should close the door to the horde of
1000s of newbies with 30-40 photos each.

and about learning : after a long time you reach a point where you know exactly what you're doing
so where's the problem in proving a few hundreds image to apply with an agency ?

there's nothing wrong in being a newbie, just don't dream of selling photos.
that's something pro do, not newbies.



Now aren't you setting the bar a bit low. Isn't the final goal of any Photographer to have a one man show in a fancy Soho Photogrpahy Gallery selling a print for $5000 (with or without art groupies), or the cover of Vogue?

Its good to have aspirations, n'est pas
« Last Edit: March 03, 2010, 09:35 by etienjones »

« Reply #168 on: March 03, 2010, 09:47 »
0
Here is another perspective. I do not have a problem helping new submitters. However I do have a problem helping and watching long standing submitters take advantage of and utilize the vulnerabilities, inexperience and naivete of new submitters for their own financial gain.  The fact that the process "sometimes" harms the newcomers as well as long time submitters makes ignoring the situation hard to swallow. 

If we do not discuss industry challenges, how can we as a group take steps to become part of the solution by promoting a culture of ethical accountability?

We can build an ethical micostock culture by improving our own overall personal performance and passing on that professional expertise to others in our field who we see are also putting in the effort it takes to succeed in this business.  That culture would enable an environment of sustainable development for all of us.

If we ignore those who with open eyes are willing to base their business plans on exploiting the vulnerabilities of the industry as well as exploiting the newest inexperience individuals entering into it, knowing full well that they will be harming the industry as a whole, we have only ourselves to blame as the situation continues to deteriorate.

I think I'm missing something you're trying to infer here, and it's not making sense to me.  Aside from silly referral pimping, how are contributors taking advantage of new contributors?  I want to point out the madness in your statement about giving our "expertise to others in our field who we see are also putting in the effort it takes to succeed in this business" but I sense your meaning is a bit incomplete.  Of all the people that I don't want to cultivate, it's those that are putting in the effort it takes to succeed (compete with me).

« Reply #169 on: March 03, 2010, 09:48 »
0
What happens when a newbie(me) agrees with the guys against newbies(atleast the general idea that promoting contributor refferal links hurts you in the long run). Will microstock shatter?Will hell freeze? Will Fotolia increase commissions?

However, as long as the agencies will have these refferal bonuses(for contributors) we can't do much. More agencies should promote buyer refferal offers and bonuses. That way both agencies and contributors profit and you can actually earn something from the refferal(think of getting 10% of a 5000$ deposit :) )
Alas, the agencies have the power, but atleast let's hope the standards for getting photographs(and hopefully illustrations) accepted will keep the supply steady.

One way or the other fighting on a forum won't solve any issues. Happy shooting.

RT


« Reply #170 on: March 03, 2010, 10:02 »
0
Aside from silly referral pimping, how are contributors taking advantage of new contributors? 

I think they were referring to the vultures that hang around places like the SS forum to prey on new submitters and then try to sell them their books and/or courses.

« Reply #171 on: March 03, 2010, 10:07 »
0
Aside from silly referral pimping, how are contributors taking advantage of new contributors? 

I think they were referring to the vultures that hang around places like the SS forum to prey on new submitters and then try to sell them their books and/or courses.

Ah.  Right.  I rarely read there... Thx.

« Reply #172 on: March 03, 2010, 10:08 »
0
Hahaha, you all crack me up. ( and by you all I don't mean anyone specific  :-* )

You take an industry that was created on welcoming hobbyist, amateurs, and newbies; then you find a way to make a living.  That's great, more power to you.  You did this while fighting off traditional RM and RF stock shooters whose market you were destroying.  You were partying off your nickels while telling the "Professional" stock photographers to shove it.

NOW, you are in an industry that is STILL welcome to hobbyist, amateurs, and newbies with one simple change; quality has increased.  Now that you have found the flaws in your actions, you blame it on new comers and forget where you started.  But it's never been your fault has it; it's theirs.

Be rude to anyone you want; it's not going to stop, or even slow down.  The agencies love you.  They do, they want to give you a hug; really.

Saying websites are taking advantage of newcomers is like saying microstock contributors are taking advantage of the agencies.

It's ok though, I have a solution to THIS problem that's almost done.  I just need to get these Chinese and Indian language packs working just right.   ;)

« Reply #173 on: March 03, 2010, 10:09 »
0
Aside from silly referral pimping, how are contributors taking advantage of new contributors? 

I think they were referring to the vultures that hang around places like the SS forum to prey on new submitters and then try to sell them their books and/or courses.

LOL (just to let you know I am a big fan of him)

« Reply #174 on: March 03, 2010, 10:11 »
0
The time of stock is really really really over by now. Yuri Arcurs is sitting near McDonald's with a styrofoam cup, begging for cents. Really. Better get out. Nothing to see here. Move on. Really.  8)
speak for yourself ;-) but the time to start new in microstock seems to be gone...wouldn't want to be starting from scratch now and as sharply_done said earlier, the more invested you become, and ironically the more your income grows, the closer you keep your cards to your chest.
Sure. Very close. Really.  ;D


 

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