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Author Topic: How to Get Pure White Background when Isolating?  (Read 10962 times)

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« on: March 26, 2015, 13:15 »
0
Just wondering what is the best way to get pure white when isolating an object in studio? Currently I take my photos into Photoshop and use the pen tool to create a path and take the background to pure white with a grey scale shadow.

However days of editing each photo is taking its toll on my mouse hand. I have tried blowing out the background with a strobe but the light reflects back onto the object and creates all sorts of problems.

So I assume that I need to increase the distance from my backdrop to the object to cut down the reflective light from blowing out the backdrop, My question is not only will that work but in general about how far does the object need to be from the backdrop so that the reflective light won't be a problem?

Thanks


Uncle Pete

« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2015, 13:19 »
+2
Flag?

Just wondering what is the best way to get pure white when isolating an object in studio? Currently I take my photos into Photoshop and use the pen tool to create a path and take the background to pure white with a grey scale shadow.

However days of editing each photo is taking its toll on my mouse hand. I have tried blowing out the background with a strobe but the light reflects back onto the object and creates all sorts of problems.

So I assume that I need to increase the distance from my backdrop to the object to cut down the reflective light from blowing out the backdrop, My question is not only will that work but in general about how far does the object need to be from the backdrop so that the reflective light won't be a problem?

Thanks

« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2015, 13:24 »
0
Flag?

Yep, I have tried flagging so for instance, I have my object on the table with my white paper backdrop  but the object is only maybe 2 feet or less from the backdrop. and so if I use a flag the light hits the white backdrop and then bounces toward the object and camera.

Is there a certain way to light the backdrop in terms of light angle with inclusion of a flag? Maybe my angle of the lighting needs to be more from the side?

« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2015, 13:35 »
+1
Flagging can help but it won't solve the problem.  You need to move your subject far enough away from the backdrop so that when you meter from the back of your subject towards the backdrop, the f-number is the same as what you meter from the front of your subject towards the camera and front lights.  Or, you can reduce the light on your backdrop and also reduce the light coming from in front.  The point is to balance the light hitting the subject from the backdrop and the light hitting the subject from in front.   Then you don't get that flare.

BTW: this is a good tutorial (it's for portraits but the same applies for any object) https://youtu.be/IRbOZfmd7mE

No Free Lunch

« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2015, 13:41 »
+1
on people shots I tend to use 4 to 6 feet away from the white background and I use GOBO's on the strobes to keep the light on the white background only.   Still life I use a min of 2 to 4 feet away - containing the blow back is vital...

Uncle Pete

« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2015, 14:04 »
0
Original post had flags and gobos, but I wasn't sure since some people use that term for patterns of light projection.

You can also consider lighting the paper from behind. Or use some white fabric, light from behind. Whatever, never plastic or vinyl, unless you want excess reflections.

What they said. If you are too close, it's always going to be difficult. Inverse square law, the light falls off twice for the distance. 4 feet is one brightness, 8 feet will be 1/4. Which means the reflection will be much less. The direct light is the same, if the lights are the same distance.

So moving the backdrop back is definitely a good idea.


on people shots I tend to use 4 to 6 feet away from the white background and I use GOBO's on the strobes to keep the light on the white background only.   Still life I use a min of 2 to 4 feet away - containing the blow back is vital...

« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2015, 14:20 »
-19
Lighting 101 !!!  Seriously!

Sorry, but I'm really tired of people who know nothing about photography and yet they get accepted by stock "agencies". 



« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2015, 14:22 »
+21
Lighting 101 !!!  Seriously!

Sorry, but I'm really tired of people who know nothing about photography and yet they get accepted by stock "agencies". 


Everyone has to start somewhere.
If you search long enough you'll find a forum post from Yuri asking how to embed metadata into a photo.

« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2015, 14:23 »
+5
Lighting 101 !!!  Seriously!

Sorry, but I'm really tired of people who know nothing about photography and yet they get accepted by stock "agencies".

Im self taught and we all have to start somewhere, so why so harsh I'm sure you knew nothing too in the beginning!

No Free Lunch

« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2015, 14:27 »
0
I got these a while back and they really helped me out-  I know nothing about lighting at the time (2011)

http://www.amazon.com/DVD-Strobist-Lighting-Layers-David/dp/B004YG7JPK



« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2015, 14:38 »
0
I got these a while back and they really helped me out-  I know nothing about lighting at the time (2011)

http://www.amazon.com/DVD-Strobist-Lighting-Layers-David/dp/B004YG7JPK


Thanks

ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #11 on: March 26, 2015, 14:51 »
0
Hundreds of way to do isolation's.

Metedata EXIF info and more in many ways depending on camera.

« Reply #12 on: March 26, 2015, 15:13 »
+2
"However days of editing each photo is taking its toll on my mouse hand."

I use a tablet, (no toll taken). I found that I would spend more time  correcting the problems from shoot to shoot, trying to achieve a white background, than it would take to mask it off with the pen tool. That's my tool of choice, plus you can save the clipping path.a good selling point. My other alternative, on rough edges, is to use the Quick Mask tool and then modify it with the Mask Edge.  I'm fast, and I have gotten quite good at it.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2015, 15:18 by rimglow »

« Reply #13 on: March 26, 2015, 17:53 »
0
why not just light the objects properly, then use layers in PS replace backgroundcolor to white.

fritz

  • I love Tom and Jerry music

« Reply #14 on: March 26, 2015, 19:22 »
-1
How to Get Pure White Background when Isolating?
Very easy!

No Free Lunch

« Reply #15 on: March 26, 2015, 20:46 »
+3
Just thinking of my mistakes and what I would recommend before jumping into this business-

1. Learn to light - studio environment to me is the biggest area since you can shot there year around
2. Produce high quality images only- don't try to play the volume game anymore. 
3. Study the best images and take notes on what you observe from that particular image (i.e., type of light, what commercial areas)
4. Don't rush into this business
5. Keep it simple at first ( one object)
6. Don't be afraid to post your image here for our comments- yes, you might get some curt feedback but learn to use those comments positively
7. Ask yourself why you want to be in this business? What can you bring to the table?

And finally remember therre are too many so-so images flooding the business- take your time to master elements (basics first) than move on to more advanced images.

« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2015, 01:24 »
0


I use a tablet, (no toll taken). I found that I would spend more time  correcting the problems from shoot to shoot, trying to achieve a white background, than it would take to mask it off with the pen tool.

What kind of tablet ?

Thx :)


« Reply #17 on: March 27, 2015, 03:49 »
0
However days of editing each photo is taking its toll on my mouse hand.

I have no answer to your main question but I have a tip: If you have problems with your mouse hand, I do recommend some kind of ergonomic roller mouse:

http://www.contour-design.com/international-summary

It takes some days to get used to these, but when you have learned to use them you work much faster and your hand will heal.

« Reply #18 on: March 27, 2015, 07:02 »
+1
Also when you flag you should
1) use the flag in the correct distance between the subject and background. The flags should be closer to the background (with no ligh hitting them!) than you realize, do some tests.
2) not overexposure the background more than you need. You need to have the background just barely brighter than the subject.

« Reply #19 on: March 27, 2015, 07:20 »
+1
Lighting 101 !!!  Seriously!

Sorry, but I'm really tired of people who know nothing about photography and yet they get accepted by stock "agencies".

Being accepted by a stock agency doesn't mean that you know much about photography...

« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2015, 08:32 »
-6
Lighting 101 !!!  Seriously!

Sorry, but I'm really tired of people who know nothing about photography and yet they get accepted by stock "agencies".

Im self taught and we all have to start somewhere, so why so harsh I'm sure you knew nothing too in the beginning!
You're wrong! I studied photography several years and long before I joined stock.

« Reply #21 on: March 27, 2015, 08:33 »
-5
Lighting 101 !!!  Seriously!

Sorry, but I'm really tired of people who know nothing about photography and yet they get accepted by stock "agencies". 


Everyone has to start somewhere.
If you search long enough you'll find a forum post from Yuri asking how to embed metadata into a photo.
That was many years ago, when amateurs and people who knew nothing about photography had a chance to succeed in this business. 

I understand you need new members for MSG (many of the old ones have gone), but honestly, are you happy with all these wannabe photographers flooding good work with their crappy and copycat images?

« Reply #22 on: March 27, 2015, 08:38 »
-1
Lighting 101 !!!  Seriously!

Sorry, but I'm really tired of people who know nothing about photography and yet they get accepted by stock "agencies".

Being accepted by a stock agency doesn't mean that you know much about photography...
That's precisely the problem.

« Reply #23 on: March 27, 2015, 08:43 »
0
4. Don't rush into this business
Completely agree!

« Reply #24 on: March 27, 2015, 09:06 »
+12
Why get mad? The guy doesn't - yet - know how to do it. That's not your problem, it's his.  And if someone produces bad images and sites accept them, that's not the supplier's fault, it's the agency's.  Istock's dropped its bar so low because it wants all this stuff. If someone asks for help and you don't feel like helping, why not just ignore it?


 

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