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Author Topic: Do real people live in hospitals?  (Read 10510 times)

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« on: July 22, 2009, 16:56 »
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I wonder why all this so called "lifestyle" photos are taken in environment staging real life apartments to be so white and sterile looking?


« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2009, 17:39 »
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Because, that is what sells.

« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2009, 17:54 »
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If you read the request forums designers always seem to be asking for stuff with simple background that isn't distracting.   

I guess those washed out whitish backgrounds are a good compromise.  They can sell to designers that want location and also are easy to isolate if they want that.

« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2009, 20:42 »
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That is how many apartments here are. All white. Cheap paint. You are not allowed to change it. Some do not even let you hang pictures. They do not want holes in the walls. Most apartments around here are rented(leased).

« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2009, 20:54 »
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I wonder why all this so called "lifestyle" photos are taken in environment staging real life apartments to be so white and sterile looking?

I have actually met a couple of people who live in 'better homes and garden' magazine houses there are a few people in the world like it. 

unfortunately not too many people would really be interested in the images from inside my house and lifestyle with the dishes piling up, toys and books on the floor, etc etc :):)

« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2009, 21:01 »
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That is how many apartments here are. All white. Cheap paint. You are not allowed to change it. Some do not even let you hang pictures. They do not want holes in the walls. Most apartments around here are rented(leased).

when I was in the air force, defence housing would not let you put pics on walls. everyone did and when moving out filled the holes with toothpaste (everyone had white walls). when moving in you got a wet cloth and wiped around the likely height of each wall and the holes reappeared for you to put your picture hangers in.

« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2009, 00:37 »
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haha, my aunt mentioned doing a similar thing when renting a university house on the cheap :)

« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2009, 02:48 »
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i know somebody who installed a power point to hide a hole in the wall they made by accident. The power point wasn't attached to any wires, got his bond back when he moved out.

I can only assume the next tennants tried to use it and would have called the real estate to send an electrician to repair it. I can imagine the confused looks when the electrician would have taken the power point off the wall to see what the problem was.  :)

michealo

« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2009, 05:04 »
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i know somebody who installed a power point to hide a hole in the wall they made by accident. The power point wasn't attached to any wires, got his bond back when he moved out.

I can only assume the next tennants tried to use it and would have called the real estate to send an electrician to repair it. I can imagine the confused looks when the electrician would have taken the power point off the wall to see what the problem was.  :)

great idea!

« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2009, 06:18 »
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White walls are not popular here.  Light grey (called "ice" color, who knows why) and cream are more popular colors.  "Modern" homes use stronger colors.  Baby bedrooms often get pastel colors, in the past blue or yellow or pink, more recently stronger such as purple or orange.  I knew a woman in her 20s who had her bedroom painted in black, but she was not an average person. :)

« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2009, 13:30 »
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I meant that this photos are not taken in real homes but simulated in studio and then brightness is upped so much that it looks like washed out.

« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2009, 14:44 »
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I meant that this photos are not taken in real homes but simulated in studio and then brightness is upped so much that it looks like washed out.


If you watch the clips from
Yuri Arcurs Studio Tour
you can see that everything is coloured light with white and pastel colours, this includes a lot of the furnishing as well, the hospital set has a grey bed and white walls.

Yuri's daylight studio is an industrial greenhouse, which is in-cased with white semi-translusent materials, so it must be more like living in a giant soft light box.

David.  
« Last Edit: July 23, 2009, 14:46 by Adeptris »

« Reply #12 on: July 23, 2009, 15:00 »
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I see, it's easier for photographer and designer but customers must like this type of photos too otherwise there will be no demand for that.

« Reply #13 on: July 23, 2009, 16:49 »
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If the demands were for real life shots wed all be rich.   It gotta be a little harder to do, to sell :)   

« Reply #14 on: July 23, 2009, 22:55 »
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Are designers real people?

« Reply #15 on: July 24, 2009, 11:54 »
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what's wrong with clean white walls? and do you absolutely have to fill the falls with different sized and shaped objects you got from you last vacations????

« Reply #16 on: July 24, 2009, 20:20 »
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Theres nothing wrong with living in "ikea world", but getty published some interesting thoughts in a pdf called "getting real" and an accompanying white paper. All about consumers wanting less bling and more of a simple life, trust and buzz words like 'monotasking'

http://imagery.gettyimages.com/FinancialServices/usa/index.html

click on download our research - but note that they want your contact details before the download


 

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