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Author Topic: Important discovery about image theft from the Shutterstock forum  (Read 5159 times)

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« on: March 20, 2008, 07:02 »
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Some of your images might have been stolen.  It would be in your best interest to read this discussion and see if you have been a victim.  I went to the site in question and have seen alot of familiar photos from members of various stock sites!

http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34877&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0


« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2008, 07:20 »
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The real odd thing about this, like a I wrote in the SS thread is that there is an ad at the bottom of the page for any site you search for. Istockphoto has over 1200 images on there.

« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2008, 07:21 »
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If you search on Photobucket with the keyword "shutterstock" or "istock", you'll come up with many. Of course it's infringement but I don't feel it's dramatic since (a) the size is maximum 500px or so, and (2) no serious designer is going to "license" photos from photobucket or flickr since he wants to play safe.

« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2008, 07:50 »
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Of course it's infringement but I don't feel it's dramatic since (a) the size is maximum 500px or so, and (2) no serious designer is going to "license" photos from photobucket or flickr since he wants to play safe.

Nothing personal, but I wholeheartedly disagree.

First, most microstock sales are for blog size (400x300) or web size (800x600) images.  So every time that someone illegally copies one of your images from a site like this, it is a potential lost sale.  Not only that, but one lost sale could lead to many others.

Second, if someone illegally copies your image and places it on another site, then there are now two illegal copies of your image.  So this leads to a potentially bigger issue down the road.

Third, if the illegal image ever makes it into some of the image search engines (such as Google), then you will really have problems.

Finally, your image might eventually become a victim of the proposed Orphan Works Act.

helix7

« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2008, 08:57 »
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...Finally, your image might eventually become a victim of the proposed Orphan Works Act.

I just read about this the other day. Freaky stuff. Seems like an open door to infringement without penalty as long as someone plays the ignorance card. Seems like all you have to do is say that you tried finding the copyright holder but were unsuccessful, and you're legally off the hook.


« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2008, 09:50 »
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I found one of mine among the istockphoto ones, but I don't see the point.  No one is going to use a watermarked thumbnail for anything, and as far as orphaned works, well, it's pretty obvious where to find the real owner.  Why would someone upload all those?

« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2008, 10:09 »
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I found one of mine among the istockphoto ones, but I don't see the point.  No one is going to use a watermarked thumbnail for anything, and as far as orphaned works, well, it's pretty obvious where to find the real owner.  Why would someone upload all those?

Look more closely... not all of them have the watermark.  >:(

jsnover

« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2008, 11:09 »
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I didn't find any of mine there (yet) but I found so many I recognized that after I was tired of sending iStock sitemail to people, I contacted iStock support to see if they can do anything.

I wonder if these folks just don't realize they're doing anything wrong, but how can you think it's OK to upload a purchased image and say it's yours?

« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2008, 13:25 »
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"Orphan Works Act"

I don't know what that is supposed to be, but I know that no law is universally accepted, and in a lot of countries works of art are protected by copyright or similar laws (s !!!) and I am not sure that anybody hiding behind an "orphan works act" could really hope to get through with using works by others and claiming "I didn't know it didn't belong to me !"

lisafx

« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2008, 13:27 »
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Well I for one am very grateful for your headsup, JoAnn.

FWIW the one of mine that JoAnn noticed did NOT have the watermark. 

I contacted photobucket and they sent me an e-mail detailing how to correctly contact them. 

Really nice thing was that the FAX number listed to send it to was no longer in service.  Hopefully I will get somewhere sending it via e-mail. 

I would be happy to post the  correct form and the contact address if it won't be violating any rules of this forum...

« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2008, 16:51 »
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Similar thread going on at the Fotolia board. Photobucket and Flickr users as the primary offenders.

« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2008, 18:37 »
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Some people will always believe that if it's on the internet it is free for the taking.  Especially when sites like this do nothing to prevent such theft. And in fact tell you flat out they are not responsible for the content of the website. I am sure photobucket is being kept busy with complaints though and appears to be taking care of the offenders if the original owner steps up and complains.


 

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