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Author Topic: When you die - a microstock contact.  (Read 4389 times)

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« on: September 15, 2009, 08:00 »
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Just a thought.

If we are to die suddenly, most of us have a lot going on online that would be tough to figure out for another person.  Most of it doesn't really matter like twitter, facebook or other social media accounts, but microstock accounts DO matter because it is our images and our money.

If someone (your heir) even knew which sites you were submitting to it would still be a real head ache for them to figure out how to get the money.  All of the sites have different payment processes, places to click, some are automatic, some are not.   You could of course show your heir how it all works and how to take out the funds, but if they had to do it 1 year later I really don't think they would have a clue or remember even which sites to go to.

So my thought is this.  Perhaps it isn't so dumb to give your heir the name of someone who can help them figure things out.  That someone wouldn't have to know very much about what you are up to specifically or any of your account information, just how the microstock sites work and how to receive payout.

So in short, my point is this.  Make sure your heirs know of a friend who is also into microstock that they can contact to help figure things out.


Dan

« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2009, 08:42 »
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  Good  idea.  I've  seeen  this  mention  on   other  sites.  Best  thing  to  do  is  leave  each  site  support  e-mail  in  a  secure  place  (in  a  will  if  you  have  one). 

« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2009, 08:45 »
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I would simply suggest to write things down and detain that paper with other important documents.

Make sure, you explain everything in detail, give URLs, IDs, passwords, payment details etc. and give your relatives a hint where they can find your important documents in case something happens.


« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2009, 09:22 »
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Good idea!  Given that my daughter is legally blind, having a few microstockers whom she trusts to help her through the process until my son can learn everything would be invaluable. 

Other things I have done to make the process easier for my heirs:

1) Use KeePass (Windows) / KeePassX (Mac) to store passwords and other info pertaining to each site (incl. FTP info).  The password I use to open KeePass is something related to my kids that both of them can remember easily.  I also quiz them a couple of times a year to make sure they remember it.  My KeePass database is stored on an external hard drive, just in case my laptop and I meet the same fate at the same time (rarely do I need it when traveling).

2) Everything is written down and included with my will.  Info included is where KeePass is located, individual agency info, off-site backup info, attorney/accountant/insurance info, microstock resources (like Microstockgroup's URL)...all that stuff.  Now I'll add contact info for friends in microstock who can help them with any questions. 

« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2009, 11:01 »
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As I am in very poor health, I have given my wife and son all the info needed to collect earnings on any site that I am on. Additionally I have my wife or son log on and collect for me each month right now, so that it will be second nature for them when I am gone.

Everyone should do this! Why give all your earnings to the sites?? I am sure your family would never see a cent of your earnings any other way.

-Larry

« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2009, 13:28 »
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Should the sites be given notice when the contributor dies and someone else has inherited the account, or doesn't it make any difference for them who claims the money?

« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2009, 15:23 »
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Should the sites be given notice when the contributor dies and someone else has inherited the account, or doesn't it make any difference for them who claims the money?

I think that agencies have to replace your account with relatives account, so we need to explain how to contact microstock agencies....

Does anybody ask any of agencies about this?
They should know how...

« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2009, 16:35 »
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Should the sites be given notice when the contributor dies and someone else has inherited the account, or doesn't it make any difference for them who claims the money?

Strictly speaking, I think it is illegal to use someone's password, especially when it's about money. Even if you write a legal document giving rights to someone to buy/sell things for you when you are alive (I don't know how it is named in English), it ceases when you die.  So one would need to be assigned the heir or manager of the deceased's assets to collect money on his name.

« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2009, 17:22 »
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Should the sites be given notice when the contributor dies and someone else has inherited the account, or doesn't it make any difference for them who claims the money?

Strictly speaking, I think it is illegal to use someone's password, especially when it's about money. Even if you write a legal document giving rights to someone to buy/sell things for you when you are alive (I don't know how it is named in English), it ceases when you die.  So one would need to be assigned the heir or manager of the deceased's assets to collect money on his name.

Power of Attorney gives you the right to sign someones name for them, living or dead.
A Will transfers ownership of anything to anyone you name. They then own it.
Copyrites can be sold or given away in a will or for cash.

As long as your the owner of the copyrite or item, you can do nearly anything you want with it, legally.

-Larry

« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2009, 18:19 »
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As long as your the owner of the copyrite or item, you can do nearly anything you want with it, legally.
But you have to write a legal document, right?  Not simply give passwords to a family member or friend.

« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2009, 18:33 »
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As long as your the owner of the copyrite or item, you can do nearly anything you want with it, legally.
But you have to write a legal document, right?  Not simply give passwords to a family member or friend.

To be legal a document would be required. I'm sure every country is different as to what is needed.
Giving a password to a family member would not be a problem as long as fraud is not committed.

-Larry

« Reply #11 on: September 16, 2009, 11:03 »
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But what if I  suddenly die, without any document before death...?

« Reply #12 on: September 16, 2009, 12:31 »
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But what if I  suddenly die, without any document before death...?
In my country the spouse and children automatically inherit everything (in fact it's not possible to stop any of your children to inherit). So only a death certificate and proof of relation should be necessary. But that might be different in another country.

« Reply #13 on: September 16, 2009, 16:15 »
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I believe it is the same in most countries - legal heirs would have the rights over your photo assets as anything else you own.  Strictly legally again, I don't think they would be able to receive anything before the legal partition between heirs, or at least this would require a special permit. 

« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2009, 20:48 »
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I am 43 and though I have no plans to leave this world yet, I have decided to do write everything down explaining what to do with all my work.

I even felt sad while writing my letter :'(  and couldn't stop thinking about my wife and children.


 

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