MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Let's share our story. Why are you doing stock photo?  (Read 6210 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« Reply #25 on: July 03, 2014, 22:33 »
0
I believe the Blackfoot are farther West, close to the Rockies maybe.  Central Canada has a large native population - I believe this area is typically Salteaux & Assiniboine and a lot of Metis.  Winnipeg is a fairly large city with a lot of native culture so I'm pretty sure the small town kids from afar come to big cities like here or Regina on the prairies.


« Reply #26 on: July 04, 2014, 07:53 »
+1
I believe the Blackfoot are farther West, close to the Rockies maybe.  Central Canada has a large native population - I believe this area is typically Salteaux & Assiniboine and a lot of Metis.  Winnipeg is a fairly large city with a lot of native culture so I'm pretty sure the small town kids from afar come to big cities like here or Regina on the prairies.
Thank you for all these friendly informations! One day I will travel America - who knows, may be next year?

« Reply #27 on: July 04, 2014, 09:26 »
0
i always had a camera but i was never a photographer...just took picture of what i liked without a real clue...stock photography gave me the perception of what is the photography market and was a nice way to learn many new technical aspects of photography. (lighting, flash, studio, backgrounds blablabla)
My main mistake was that i concentrated a lot in framing the subject without caring about the light and background...in my amateur studio i slowly understand (studing pictures from top sellers) how and why a light should be placed, and how a nice background must be...

Now my pictures (i mostly shoot in travel and streets) are overall better lightned and framed, for me was a kind of school :)

« Reply #28 on: July 04, 2014, 11:03 »
+3
I had a desire to do nature photography for a long time. I got some books and learned the basics and specifics without actaully owning or using a camera. I applied my degree in biology to do some volunteer wildlife field work. I was given an SLR in 2004 and we used slide film.  I bought my own camera a week later.

I kept using slides and by word of mouth i was contacted by some people looking for slides because they were preferred by publishers. I met a photo researcher from NY in 1996 and she encouraged me to shoot stock and to think beyond just nature. I bought Ron Engh'ss book " How to Sell and Resell your photos". In the 90s most of what i sold was by word of mouth. I sold some shots for a birding field guide and also I was the guy local businesses went to. I also had some graphic designers asking for photos.  I made more money selling prints from slides. I started scanning and posting on the net in 96 and i had a strong online presence in photo galleries.

 In 2007 I finally went digital. That was about the time that DSLRS were affordable and had enough quality to make a decent print. I applied to some stock photo companies and they ignored me. Since microstock is open source I decided to give that a try. I did well the first year but still made more money selling direct. A sale to a winery of one photo for a wine label made more than 100 microstock sales. As prices rose my royalties also did. The iStock Vetta program was very good for me and I had a top selling photo in that collection in 2010. My royalties per sale  are still increasing but sales are dwindling. New files don't get enough attention to catch on. I cannot afford to invest in microstock photography now. I concentrate my energy on marketing prints. My work is niched and does not have the broad appeal of some business stock

All the jobs I ever took since I bought my first camera allowed me to do at least some personal photography on the job. Getting on the inside of things was key to having whatever I  success have. These days my income is all online stock or print sales and a photography related online job. I own my own home but live I live on a poverty level income.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2014, 11:06 by landbysea »

« Reply #29 on: July 04, 2014, 22:04 »
+2
As a web developer, I found myself sourcing images from StockXchange way back when. After receiving a camera as a gift from my Mother-In-Law, I though that it would be nice to give back to the community that had helped me so much in my business.

It was incredibly gratifying to see the download numbers and to hear stories of how my images were being used. People sent me links to websites, magazines where my images had been used to illustrate articles and even a couple of covers.

One day in 2004 in the SXC forums, someone mentioned how they were getting paid for their images. WHAT?!?!?! I signup up at DT and it was off to the races.

At first, my wife and I uploaded like mad and our sales grew and grew. Then, as my web business got busier, we didn't have as much time. We got back into uploading and set a goal of 20 new uploads per week. Our sales continued to grow. We eventually ended up with a little over 1,500 images online before my full-time business (along with agency shenanigans) caused us to stop uploading alltogether around August 2011.

While our images are old (and were never that great to start with) we still manage to pay a few bills with our payouts each month. I don't regret one minute of stock, as it has made me a better photographer for my clients and has been generally rewarding overall.

Even though we don't submit anymore, we often think about picking up the camera and getting back into the game. Unfortunately, there are only 24 hours in a day.

Vic

« Reply #30 on: July 07, 2014, 02:23 »
0
Lots of interesting stories here. As for myself, I only took the plunge into stock last week. It's something I often thought about but didn't think I was good enough. However, I love a challenge and love to learn new things and like you, want to become good at something.

MS fits in well at the moment. I'm a primary school teacher but mostly stay at home with my two children right now. For the last 6 years I've been trying to sell photos, art and craft online and in a couple of shops. It's been a huge learning curve and not been easy. I'm starting an MSc in psychology in 3 months and would love to make some money to pay even a little bit of the costs! I think it may take a while though...

Am really enjoying learning about MS and it's great I can do it home. Macro is what I particularly enjoy.

Good luck,
Vic


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
0 Replies
1539 Views
Last post April 04, 2007, 13:27
by Dreamstime News
7 Replies
3003 Views
Last post January 05, 2011, 05:24
by Newsfocus1
0 Replies
1637 Views
Last post March 22, 2015, 03:29
by KnowYourOnions
6 Replies
1834 Views
Last post February 26, 2017, 18:39
by alno
17 Replies
4292 Views
Last post September 22, 2017, 14:46
by rinderart

Sponsors

Mega Bundle of 5,900+ Professional Lightroom Presets

Microstock Poll Results

Sponsors

3100 Posing Cards Bundle