pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Making the jump to the bigger boys (girls)  (Read 6450 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« on: October 27, 2006, 06:56 »
0
Has anyone made the jump from microstock like IS to one of the big boys like Alamy or Corbis, or even Getty. How was it, how did you do it, is anyone else thinking of doing it

Just get the feeling that: Its all about being the best photograph I can be. There isn't much insentive for me to push myself when i only get 20c to $1 for each image I make.


« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2006, 10:03 »
0
well if you didn't look at each single sale, you might be more interested in pushing yourself.  do you have monthly graphs, so you can see your monthly earnings which, can easily go into the thousdands if you work at it.

I am also a submitter on Alamy, but still prefer the micros.

« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2006, 11:29 »
0
Graphs and stats work great.  Dont just try to increase income (easy by just increasing photos) but income per photo (ie. better more sellable photos).

« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2006, 11:31 »
0
good points.

good keywords could also help the $/photo avg rise.

« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2006, 11:36 »
0
I went the other way.

I was with Alamy (and still am) but started selling RF through the micros too.

I still have more images with Alamy than any other agency and yet I earn more per month from IS and SS than I do with Alamy.

And it's a bit of a mistake to think that you only get 20c per image with the micros. If you push yourself and get some really good images up with them they'll sell again and again and again. So one good image can earn you 100s. (Just look at the How much has your best selling image made you? thread running at the same time as this one.)
« Last Edit: October 28, 2006, 04:46 by Bateleur »

« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2006, 03:22 »
0
Just to throw something out there...

It's not about being the best photographer you can be, it's about being smart in business...  Being a great photographer will get you to the top of the heap faster, having a sensible process and business plan behind any talent will make you a reliable income.

I know a few people in the photography business that arn't that good at the photography part, but still make a very good living because they got the business bit right first...

Cheers, Me.

« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2006, 05:44 »
0
And you need lots of time..

« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2006, 13:47 »
0
When did Alamy become a big boy or girl. They will accept anyone and anything.

I think the big boys are Jupiter Stock's, Corbis and Getty's (among others) RF product lines. There you are selling your images for hundreds of dollars per sale, not pennies.

Someday. I am still finding this RF thing very weird, when I am used to selling my images with rights managed licenses for hundreds and thousands of dollars, depending on the use.

But I will give it a try.

Best.

gg

Greg Boiarsky

« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2006, 14:34 »
0
Alamy is one of the older and more respected of the stock houses.  The do not sell photos for pennies.  Rights-free images run approximately $100 to $300, depending on size.  RM images sell for around the same, depending on the license and usage.

Alamy comes closest to traditional stock of the online houses.  And, places like Getty aren't the be-all and end-all of stock photography.  Take a look at some of their offerings, and you'll see a lot of poor images among the better ones.  Also, look at Corbis, which is continually increasing its stock of fully-owned images.  The photographer sells the image to Corbis and loses further stock rights to that image.

The world is changing.

When did Alamy become a big boy or girl. They will accept anyone and anything.

I think the big boys are Jupiter Stock's, Corbis and Getty's (among others) RF product lines. There you are selling your images for hundreds of dollars per sale, not pennies.

Someday. I am still finding this RF thing very weird, when I am used to selling my images with rights managed licenses for hundreds and thousands of dollars, depending on the use.

But I will give it a try.

Best.

gg

« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2006, 15:48 »
0
I applied to Getty a few weeks ago and my work is currently under review. I'm told by them that they will notify me one way or another. I am keeping my hopes humble.

.
       
tom
« Last Edit: January 12, 2007, 23:32 by TGT »

« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2006, 17:21 »
0
I applied to Getty a few weeks ago and my work is currently under review.

What are their submission requirements? Is there a web site giving the details, or can you tell us?

« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2006, 19:50 »
0
It's tuff finding your way into the application area... Hope this works for you.
Go to  gettyimages.com
.. at the bottom of that screen click on   'about us'
.. at the bottom of that screen click on   ' media'
.. at the bottom of that screen click on  'contributors'

that will lead you to the 'get started'  area. 
There are a series of information packs to read. Once read, you would email them at the submission guidelines area requesting the specifics required.

they will mail you back the guidelines... there are a few questions to consider...  are you familiar with the workings of ad agencies and  working with models..    are you familiar with the model release legalities... are you able to work with art directors or follow their creative briefs...  are you able to finance your own shoots up front...are you confident in your own creative ability to produce highly saleable content....     do you have the willingness to go on assignment...  etc.

My impression is that they weren't especially interested in using all your current photo's  { although I also felt that they would take them } but rather, they are more interested with what you can now produce for them. Obviously, all of those photos in their inventory can't be,  'currently produced',  they must be from the photographer's past inventory. Some of the material you will read can be kind of vague.   
   They will ask for 15  low rez (72 dpi) examples of your best work. That can be submitted via email.

What I didn't notice anywhere was a minimum size requirement of the files. For example,  when I applied to Jupiter, they say right up front that you must be shooting with a camera producing a minimum 12 megapixels. I'm not at this time.  As for uprezing... I have no clue.  Getty said nothing of uprezed either. Yet Alamy requires you to uprez to 42 meg....  if  I'm understanding the Alamy requirement incorrectly, someone PLEASE, straigthen me out.

I answered the questions and sent in my 15 low rez and they acknowledged it all saying thanks,  and don't expect an answer for at least a month.

I hope that's of value to you, Bateleur.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2006, 19:52 by TGT »

« Reply #12 on: October 29, 2006, 06:10 »
0
Thanks. Yes. Very helpful.

It's worth knowing. Something to aim for. Actually, I heard that what with massively increased competition from other sites, Getty will now be opening up what was once a pretty closed shop. That's why I was interested. But I haven't (yet) got the facilities to take on specific studio assignments.

As for image size, yes, Alamy requires you to uprez to a minimum of 48mp (I think it is) using certain specific software. The two they recommend are Photoshop and Genuine Fractals

« Last Edit: October 29, 2006, 06:13 by Bateleur »

« Reply #13 on: October 29, 2006, 09:26 »
0
Glad I could help. And thanks for the Alamy data.  I actually work between 3 pieces of software as each has a feature I prefer over the other.  Photoshop 7, Elements and Micrografx PP 7a.  UpRezzin is all new to me.  I'm trying it in Elements in a 'step' manner.   I guess the result looks good...  it's kind of blows my mind that I can take an 18meg pic blow it up to 42meg, and it still looks fine.  Whoa, where's all the extra dots come from....???  ha ha ha ha ha.
     I've read that Alamy will soon allow application on-line so ya don't have to submit a disk.  Anyone know anything about that?

« Reply #14 on: October 29, 2006, 16:09 »
0
     I've read that Alamy will soon allow application on-line so ya don't have to submit a disk.  Anyone know anything about that?

Yes. They've been testing it with certain selected users (not me  >:() for some months now. Apparently they haven't got it to work as they wanted - don't know the details - so the launch has been postponed indefinitely. What a difference between Alamy's approach and iStock's!

Anyway, for Alamy you still have to send in everything on CD or DVD which is a bit tedious, I must admit. Also their approval times are running to about a month at the moment ... so don't hold your breath.

« Reply #15 on: October 30, 2006, 18:18 »
0
Thank you, VERY much! 
    tom

« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2007, 23:37 »
0
Follow up on my comments back in october.   just for the record.....  so much for the nice email I got from getty back then when I applied....    here I sit January 12th,   haven't heard from them since.  You'd think since they have my pictures in their hands, they'd at least mail me back and say..   "your work sux, thanks anyway for wasting our time".    Glad I kept my hopes humble.        LOL 


« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2007, 00:09 »
0
Well you can always join istock, and become a diamond (or gold by the time you have the downloads). Then you will be able to submit to getty.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2007, 05:14 by yingyang0 »

« Reply #18 on: January 13, 2007, 00:45 »
0
 :) Thanks for the lift in spirit, YY. Appreciate it.

peace - tom
« Last Edit: January 13, 2007, 01:03 by TGT »

« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2007, 15:35 »
0
Well, I had roughly 500 images up on Alamy for a whole year and never sold a one. So I took them all off and in April I'll be uploading them all the the micros.... I lost 1000s of $$ for my choice.

But I do know some photogs making as much on Alamy as they are in the micros so to each it's own I guess.

For me, the micros is the way to go and is the major part of my 2007 business plan.

« Reply #20 on: January 13, 2007, 18:27 »
0
Follow up on my comments back in october.   just for the record.....  so much for the nice email I got from getty back then when I applied....    here I sit January 12th,   haven't heard from them since.  You'd think since they have my pictures in their hands, they'd at least mail me back and say..   "your work sux, thanks anyway for wasting our time".    Glad I kept my hopes humble.        LOL 

FYI, I applied to Getty here in NZ a while ago, took them over a month to say 'no thanks'.  I was specifically submitting sports/event work for their editorial area, not stock, but it did take ages to get rejected. :)


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
4 Replies
3621 Views
Last post July 21, 2007, 08:48
by leaf
0 Replies
1833 Views
Last post September 15, 2009, 22:36
by Phil
10 Replies
4571 Views
Last post October 08, 2009, 16:42
by KB
12 Replies
3934 Views
Last post December 10, 2012, 10:32
by gemmy12
7 Replies
2955 Views
Last post September 15, 2014, 05:32
by topol

Sponsors

Mega Bundle of 5,900+ Professional Lightroom Presets

Microstock Poll Results

Sponsors

3100 Posing Cards Bundle