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Author Topic: Microstock photos with people usually too bright  (Read 1878 times)

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« on: January 19, 2017, 09:20 »
0
I see this tendency that photos with models are really bright, overexposed. Is there are a rule that when the photo is with model you can overexpose it?

I have gotten rejections for overexposure, even less than this but without model.


« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2017, 09:35 »
+2
Usually the model is exposed appropriately with the surroundings bright.  Post one of yours if wanting critique.

« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2017, 09:51 »
0
Usually the model is exposed appropriately with the surroundings bright.  Post one of yours if wanting critique.

I definately need it.

https://scontent-sit4-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t35.0-12/16196382_1414564948556456_1131071698_o.jpg?oh=7893bbd27e20e322ba9f40d60890ad61&oe=5883F413

« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2017, 10:01 »
0
the tendency has changed...in the beginning a blow sky was a no no in micro stock....today with more natural look needed, and the request for strong backlighting , both artificial or natural, the blown sky is not a problem especially if there are nothing to retain detail of, but the good exposure of subject is a norm...so in the photo u posted u can easily overexpose the sky one stop more and brighten the subject.
some years ago probably a bit more flash light on the subject and you would have been accepted image, today trend is overexpose the background. Another consideration is an overexposed sky, near white, can be used as space to add text while a well exposed background can be not used if there are clouds or other item.

« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2017, 10:20 »
0
the tendency has changed...in the beginning a blow sky was a no no in micro stock....today with more natural look needed, and the request for strong backlighting , both artificial or natural, the blown sky is not a problem especially if there are nothing to retain detail of, but the good exposure of subject is a norm...so in the photo u posted u can easily overexpose the sky one stop more and brighten the subject.
some years ago probably a bit more flash light on the subject and you would have been accepted image, today trend is overexpose the background. Another consideration is an overexposed sky, near white, can be used as space to add text while a well exposed background can be not used if there are clouds or other item.

Thanks,

so I need to overepose only the background, without the subject ?

« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2017, 10:50 »
0
the tendency has changed...in the beginning a blow sky was a no no in micro stock....today with more natural look needed, and the request for strong backlighting , both artificial or natural, the blown sky is not a problem especially if there are nothing to retain detail of, but the good exposure of subject is a norm...so in the photo u posted u can easily overexpose the sky one stop more and brighten the subject.
some years ago probably a bit more flash light on the subject and you would have been accepted image, today trend is overexpose the background. Another consideration is an overexposed sky, near white, can be used as space to add text while a well exposed background can be not used if there are clouds or other item.

Thanks,

so I need to overepose only the background, without the subject ?

well if you use natural light yes overexposing back u push the exposure on the subject too...it would be correct to measure light on subject with a light meter, subject is underexposed cause is backlighted, add one stop or one and a third stop to measurement and u are correct. if you don't have light meter use meter of camera, it's less spot on but still near.

different if u use flash. flad. it depend on the moods of photos...if you want to overpower daylight u need powerful flash,

« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2017, 10:51 »
0
the tendency has changed...in the beginning a blow sky was a no no in micro stock....today with more natural look needed, and the request for strong backlighting , both artificial or natural, the blown sky is not a problem especially if there are nothing to retain detail of, but the good exposure of subject is a norm...so in the photo u posted u can easily overexpose the sky one stop more and brighten the subject.
some years ago probably a bit more flash light on the subject and you would have been accepted image, today trend is overexpose the background. Another consideration is an overexposed sky, near white, can be used as space to add text while a well exposed background can be not used if there are clouds or other item.

sorry u need to measure the background and add one stop and third.

Thanks,

so I need to overepose only the background, without the subject ?

well if you use natural light yes overexposing back u push the exposure on the subject too...it would be correct to measure light on subject with a light meter, subject is underexposed cause is backlighted, add one stop or one and a third stop to measurement and u are correct. if you don't have light meter use meter of camera, it's less spot on but still near.

different if u use flash. flad. it depend on the moods of photos...if you want to overpower daylight u need powerful flash,

« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2017, 11:11 »
+2
Usually the model is exposed appropriately with the surroundings bright.  Post one of yours if wanting critique.

I definately need it.

https://scontent-sit4-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t35.0-12/16196382_1414564948556456_1131071698_o.jpg?oh=7893bbd27e20e322ba9f40d60890ad61&oe=5883F413

Assuming this is just a test, her face is definitely underexposed.  I would use a reflector off to the side.  You don't want to blow out the background in an image like this, outdoors, because it will just look like you don't know what you are doing.  I was thinking you were referring to indoor images.

« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2017, 14:10 »
0
My understanding is that they have blinkers for blacks and highlights, just like in editing apps, which are easily "tricked" if you cut off just a tiny bit of the extreme ends with tone curve. You can observe this in photos you mention, backgrounds are blown, but they are not pure white.
Thou I don't think this approach would be suitable for the type of shots like the one you presented, you don't have an obvious strong backlight, you just have a wide dynamic range and you need to expose for the background and light the model separately.


 

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