pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Monitor Color?  (Read 2492 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« on: September 08, 2016, 02:37 »
0
Just wondering what others have their monitors set to. For those who have a iMac are you using the iMac, Adobe RGB 1998, sRGB or some other setting for your Color Setting?

My Camera is set to sRGB, for the longest time my monitor would not match my Camera Display when Tethered Shooting. When I checked my color display it was on the Mac setting so I changed it to sRGB and now it matches my camera display, although I am shooting in raw and I believe that the camera display shows the image in jpeg so there should be some difference between the Camera display and the monitor?

Thanks,


gyllens

« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2016, 03:04 »
+1
You really want to set your camera to Adobe RGB shooting in Raw format and also the iMac. Don't know how involved you are in photography but most of us will calibrate our monitors with an external calibrator at least for professional use.

« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2016, 04:07 »
0
You really want to set your camera to Adobe RGB shooting in Raw format and also the iMac. Don't know how involved you are in photography but most of us will calibrate our monitors with an external calibrator at least for professional use.

I too do it like gyllens said. Just want to add that I convert the images to sRGB at the end. All the shooting and editing is made in AdobeRGB and before saving to JPG at the end I convert to sRGB. The AdobeRGB color space represents a wider range of colors and sRGB is the standard in the web, devices and printers.

« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2016, 13:51 »
0
You really want to set your camera to Adobe RGB shooting in Raw format and also the iMac. Don't know how involved you are in photography but most of us will calibrate our monitors with an external calibrator at least for professional use.

I too do it like gyllens said. Just want to add that I convert the images to sRGB at the end. All the shooting and editing is made in AdobeRGB and before saving to JPG at the end I convert to sRGB. The AdobeRGB color space represents a wider range of colors and sRGB is the standard in the web, devices and printers.

So if you convert to sRGB in the end what is the advantage of shooting in AdobeRBG as any advantage is then lost in the conversion to sRGB?

Any recommendations on a external calibrator for iMac Monitor?

« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2016, 20:26 »
0
You really want to set your camera to Adobe RGB shooting in Raw format and also the iMac. Don't know how involved you are in photography but most of us will calibrate our monitors with an external calibrator at least for professional use.


I too do it like gyllens said. Just want to add that I convert the images to sRGB at the end. All the shooting and editing is made in AdobeRGB and before saving to JPG at the end I convert to sRGB. The AdobeRGB color space represents a wider range of colors and sRGB is the standard in the web, devices and printers.


So if you convert to sRGB in the end what is the advantage of shooting in AdobeRBG as any advantage is then lost in the conversion to sRGB?

Any recommendations on a external calibrator for iMac Monitor?


I use Spyder software on my iMac.

Also, Ken Rockwell has a very good piece on RGB v. SRGB

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/adobe-rgb.htm
« Last Edit: September 08, 2016, 20:32 by Mantis »

substancep

  • Medical, science, nature, and macro photography

« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2016, 21:12 »
+2
I'm pretty sure the difference between Adobe RGB and sRGB is negligible for 99.9% of all photographic applications, especially more so for microstock photography.

« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2016, 22:17 »
+1
I'm pretty sure the difference between Adobe RGB and sRGB is negligible for 99.9% of all photographic applications, especially more so for microstock photography.

Yup.

Benozaur

« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2016, 05:00 »
0
I'm pretty sure the difference between Adobe RGB and sRGB is negligible for 99.9% of all photographic applications, especially more so for microstock photography.

Yup as well.
Adobe RGB does have a wider color gamut useful for color correction but most monitors and printers don't support it - yes you can work within its colorspace but thats not the same as physically being able to reproduce it. Personally I don't bother with it as its just another intermidiate step, you should be outputting sRGB for digital release anyway...

As for monitors - you pay for what you get. I highly recommend Eizo monitors, a bit pricey for the average casual consumer but worth a look anyway :)

To answer your original question - if your camera display and monitor are both set to the same colorspace, sRGB in this case, then that should be the closest representation of colors between the two devices. Remember that all monitors are different and none will match consistently over a longer time period unless you are willing to spend big bucks. Just keep your imac calibrated and you should be fine - works for me.

gyllens

« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2016, 15:26 »
0
The whole reason for colour management is that what you see on the monitor should ultimately match the final print. Of course one could argue that in micro-stock you don't need this and that but reallity is somewhat different. Very difficult to get a good match between monitor-picture colours and the final print without colour management, calibrating both monitor and printer.

It would certainly be impossible to supply our RM/RF agencies with files not properly colour corrected.



« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2016, 05:11 »
+1
I'm pretty sure the difference between Adobe RGB and sRGB is negligible for 99.9% of all photographic applications, especially more so for microstock photography.

Oui!
1) Most of the customers have not a calibrated monitor (so they see the colors in a different way)
2) Most of the web browsers does not support well the ICC profiles (so they show the colors in a different way)

« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2016, 13:57 »
0
Best compromise is sRGB.


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
37 Replies
11081 Views
Last post November 06, 2009, 14:58
by eyeCatchLight
17 Replies
8894 Views
Last post September 21, 2010, 15:33
by miskolin
14 Replies
29533 Views
Last post February 13, 2011, 12:51
by Jo Ann Snover
14 Replies
3039 Views
Last post February 05, 2014, 19:44
by ShadySue
1 Replies
1319 Views
Last post June 28, 2016, 06:25
by shotupdave

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results