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Author Topic: Most Photographed Places  (Read 30691 times)

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« on: December 15, 2013, 15:48 »
+1
Very interesting map of the "Most Photographed Places".  I don't know the source but it does tell me I have a big problem living in central Europe.

more info:
"The http://www.sightsmap.com/ website is an interactive map that allows you to see which areas of the world have had the most photographs taken -- in other words, every place you should avoid if you wish to take a unique photograph. Europe is remarkably popular. North Pole not so much.

    The heatmaps are based solely on the number of available Panoramio photos for an area: both the number of photos and the number of authors is taken into account.

    The dark and the blue areas have a few photos, the red areas have more and the yellow areas have a large number of photos geotagged."

and like all Google Maps, you scale down to the street level
« Last Edit: December 15, 2013, 16:05 by etienjones »


ShadySue

« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2013, 16:02 »
+2
On the other hand, I have lots of pics from at least one of the darkest places on the map, and although there are few 'rivals', there doesn't seem to be much of a market for them.

« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2013, 17:37 »
0
Or maybe panoramio is popular in Europe and not so much elsewhere.

I bet a few hundred K from the N pole has a lot less photos than the N pole.

Goofy

« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2013, 18:42 »
0
Where ever I go  :(



ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2013, 21:48 »
0
I am in an area that is not very photographed but is world rank: 2119 and another that is world rank: 2820 and world rank: 2926 and as well as world rank: 25.

Goofy


« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2013, 00:03 »
0
I think photos from all of these "most photographed" places sell because they are key tourist destinations. More than half my stock photo portfolio is travel and I find that the more popular a destination is, the more often photos from there sell. I have photos, for example, of Rome (Ranked #2) that I took with my old D70 from 2007 and they still sell today as do the handful of photos I took in Boston a few years ago during the few hours that it wasn't raining (Rank #45). My best sellers include some of the most photographed lighthouses in the US (ranked in the 2000s-10,000 worldwide - all yellow on the map -so still pretty high) - especially some of the most popular on Cape Cod and up in Maine - photos of those very heavily photographed areas sell well and although there are many shots of the same lighthouses I have, despite the competition they sell frequently.

My rarer shots from more out of the way places sell far less often. So, I wouldn't really worry so much about a place being too popular. IMHO there's still a market for good travel shots of popular destinations.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2013, 00:19 by wordplanet »

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2013, 03:51 »
0
It could be interesting to know who is photographing the Most Photographed Places.

Japanese? Korean? Chinese? Liechtensteiners?

ShadySue

« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2013, 07:49 »
0
It could be interesting to know who is photographing the Most Photographed Places.

Japanese? Korean? Chinese? Liechtensteiners?

Anyone who lives or travels there.
I guess what you're really meaning is 'what is the demographic of those who upload most to Panoramio?'.

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2013, 08:44 »
0
It could be interesting to know who is photographing the Most Photographed Places.

Japanese? Korean? Chinese? Liechtensteiners?

Anyone who lives or travels there.
I guess what you're really meaning is 'what is the demographic of those who upload most to Panoramio?'.

No, I just wonder who are those, while travelling, are taking more pictures.
You know, these hordes of asian tourists seeing the world around without unstick the eye from the camera, and then seeing their travels at home on the big TV
(No offense for them of course different cultures different habits)
« Last Edit: December 16, 2013, 11:29 by Beppe Grillo »

Goofy

« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2013, 10:22 »
+2
All I know is that when I travel I will not be carrying along my Canon neck breaker camera! I will bring my little OLY 4 by 3 mirrorless camera and enjoy my vacation and not worry about stock photography.

« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2013, 17:08 »
0
How many times a place is photographed doesn't says anything about the quality of the photos.

« Reply #12 on: December 16, 2013, 17:11 »
0
it's kinda creepy that this information is available and tracked... what else is being tracked?

« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2013, 18:11 »
+2
it's kinda creepy that this information is available and tracked... what else is being tracked?

Big Brother has a name . . . . . Google.

« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2013, 18:35 »
0
That same map also looks like a population density map. Maybe those places are he most photographed because that's where the most people live.

« Reply #15 on: December 16, 2013, 18:53 »
0
That same map also looks like a population density map. Maybe those places are he most photographed because that's where the most people live.

not necessarily - I found big empty spaces for several places in India that I know are well covered by the stock agencies - both my images and others'

« Reply #16 on: December 28, 2013, 20:54 »
0
Well no wonder europe and the western countries have the most photographed places.. The most camera owners live in these regions  :P


« Reply #17 on: December 29, 2013, 00:11 »
+1
Big Brother has a name . . . . . Google.


Google is going to blackmail you

Uncle Pete

« Reply #18 on: December 29, 2013, 22:15 »
0
But the first name is collecting personal data is still Facebook. Ever notice how many places you can just sign in with your Facebook account? How strange is that? And people voluntarily post all their personal thoughts and information on FB!

Google just collects the data that we already put somewhere else.

The most photographed places is looking at geotags. More people and more people with smartphones = more geotags. It's nothing but the obvious. More photos are taken where there are more people.

Let me restate that. There's no useful information in that map for producing stock images that will have a better demand or sell better. Not a speck! The map could have been titled, where are the most people, with smartphones...
.


it's kinda creepy that this information is available and tracked... what else is being tracked?

Big Brother has a name . . . . . Google.

« Reply #19 on: December 30, 2013, 00:14 »
0
I'm actually not even on Facebook, but do use quite a few Google products. I ran across that video the other day and just though that I'd found the perfect place to share it.

« Reply #20 on: December 30, 2013, 04:01 »
+1
Then let's say FB is Big Brother's Evil Twin.

Uncle Pete

« Reply #21 on: December 31, 2013, 12:10 »
0
Lets say, you're right:) Anyone wondering why they can earn money for making Bing their default search? #3 wants to move up the standings.

Referral link: http://www.bing.com/explore/rewards?PUBL=REFERAFRIEND&CREA=RAW&rrid=_65a187a1-9487-8aa9-e2c1-aaf68ce52cda

I've already cashed for $5 Amazon gift card (used for anything on Amazon) twice and one metal print. Have never had one referral enrollment.

That's all one point a day and one point for each three searches. (there are some bonus days, I don't pay attention)

But by setting Bing as my default search and doing what I normally do, I'm getting "rewards". Pays better than a couple of Micro sites. (imagine that?)  :o

Anyway, not picking at your for the article, you didn't collect the data or write it. Just pointing out it's taking random smartphone data, so all it really represents is where there are the most smartphones.

And for people like me who use a camera and don't own a smartphone, nothing I shoot is included. Another way of looking at it, is population density map?

Then let's say FB is Big Brother's Evil Twin.


Update: (allegedly)  In the course of the last year, independent security researchers discovered that Facebook reviews the contents of its users private Facebook messages for purposes unrelated to the facilitation of message transmission. When a user composes a Facebook message and includes a link to a third party website (a URL), the Company scans the content of the Facebook message, follows the enclosed link, and searches for information to profile the message-senders web activity.

If it's true, worse that some company that scans things out in the open.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2014, 10:45 by Uncle Pete »


 

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