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Author Topic: Check out this UELA. Safe?  (Read 5507 times)

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Leo Blanchette

« on: December 11, 2008, 15:14 »
0
Hey yalls,

I'm gonna start submitting 3d models to turbosquid. I just want to make sure if I upload my AO-Maru robot (here -- http://www.istockphoto.com/file_search.php?action=file&lightboxID=3732238 ) that people cannot use it to make stock imaging and compete with me in stock imaging. The wording on the UELA is tough for me to follow, but it seems they can actually do this if they want.

I was wondering if any of you legal beagles might sniff out anything in this that is of concern, of if its relatively safe. Here is eula:
http://www.turbosquid.com/OneOff/EULA.cfm


CofkoCof

« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2008, 15:59 »
0
Quote
The Seller grants to the Member who either purchases license rights to Content via a Valid Sale, or downloads freely available Content submitted by the Seller, a non-exclusive, worldwide, license in any medium now known or hereinafter invented to: (a) reproduce, post, promote, license, sell, publicly perform, publicly display, digitally perform, or transmit for promotional and commercial purposes; (b
They can sell it. They can render it and sell it (even as your direct competitors on microstock sites). They can render a million dolar movie with AO-Maru as the main char and make millions by it. At least if I understand it correctly.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2008, 16:02 by CofkoCof »

Leo Blanchette

« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2008, 16:03 »
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Thats the impression I got to! Thats risky.

A certain one of our microstock fellows sells there as well. Perhaps I should ask him how it works for him. That is, if he can be nice for a change. :D

jsnover

« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2008, 17:56 »
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"For illustration, approved distribution or use of Content as Incorporated Content includes, but is not limited to:

(i) As rendered still images or moving images; resold as part of a feature film, broadcast, or stock photography."

Doesn't this directly say that they can sell the rendered images as stock?

Leo Blanchette

« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2008, 18:05 »
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Yes, I found it hard to believe that you can actually download a model, render, then sell. Thats really easy.

The nice thing is that Istock and similar agencies don't allow you to sell renders of other people's models. Or am I wrong on that?

« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2008, 18:32 »
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Yes, I found it hard to believe that you can actually download a model, render, then sell. Thats really easy.

The nice thing is that Istock and similar agencies don't allow you to sell renders of other people's models. Or am I wrong on that?

they allow poser and daz models.

Patrick H.

« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2008, 21:20 »
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I sell models at Turbosquid and it works well for me. The thing is I try to keep my 3d stock (turbosquid) and my microstock collections as separate as possible. I sell almost only vectors in microstock. If you have models that are staples of your microstock collection I wouldn't put them up on Turbosquid.

Microbius

« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2008, 03:54 »
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They may be able to do it under the turbo squid terms, but this doesn't necessarily mean that the microstock site would allow it.
Some insist that all source material is entirely produced by the submitter.
Still, dangerous ground, I wouldn't upload your robot, as you have a whole series earning for you from it.

Leo Blanchette

« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2008, 10:51 »
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Thanks guys. I'm looking forward to uploading to Tsquid.

If I may ask, how does turbosquid do for you? I'm going to be selling blender models, so I expect it will not do as well as those max users. :D

« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2008, 11:08 »
0
Yes, I found it hard to believe that you can actually download a model, render, then sell. Thats really easy.

The nice thing is that Istock and similar agencies don't allow you to sell renders of other people's models. Or am I wrong on that?

You're wrong on that...

Leo Blanchette

« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2008, 11:29 »
0
Yes, I found it hard to believe that you can actually download a model, render, then sell. Thats really easy.

The nice thing is that Istock and similar agencies don't allow you to sell renders of other people's models. Or am I wrong on that?

You're wrong on that...

Fill me in here! All this time I could have been downloading models and rendering them for stock? That just feels wrong.

« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2008, 11:46 »
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Yeah, I protested it when I started doing 3d, but since it's allowed, there you go.  Good models are expensive though.

Leo Blanchette

« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2008, 11:52 »
0
Good models are expensive though.

You mean microstock photographers pay their models?

(Hehe, there is one for the king of one-liners)

« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2008, 11:55 »
0
I'm going to be selling blender models, so I expect it will not do as well as those max users. :D

Make sure you don't upload them only as blender files, but at least also as Wavefront .obj. This allows to use them in other software, as pretty much every 3d software supports .obj.

But I think you would have more success selling .max objects, especially fully animated ones. They are more useful to professional users. Just IMHO.


 

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