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Author Topic: November Earnings Report  (Read 1587 times)

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Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« on: November 30, 2019, 07:17 »
+1
Welcome-back to Novembers action-packed edition of the Brutally Honest Earnings Report, straight from Madrid. I recall that my October was a pretty poor month ($739 in total), so lets see if I managed to recoveryoull also be surprised who I selected as the Turd of the Month Agency

https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.com/2019/11/30/nov-2019-brutally-honest-earnings-report/


« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2019, 07:53 »
0
Great info, as always.Do you, by any chance, know what we actually earn at Alamy. When I go to Sales history the Amount is actually the price the picture is sold for? And then there is 40% for Alamy and additional 30% if it is a partner sale, which usually is?

Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2019, 08:02 »
+1
Great info, as always.Do you, by any chance, know what we actually earn at Alamy. When I go to Sales history the Amount is actually the price the picture is sold for? And then there is 40% for Alamy and additional 30% if it is a partner sale, which usually is?

Thanks!

What shows up on your dashboard is the gross sale price. To get more details you actually have to go into 1. My Alamy tab 2. Account balance. There you'll be able to see how much each has earned, both as gross and then net...commissions at Alamy are on three different tiers: exclusive sale (50%), or non-exclusive sale (40%) or distribution sale (30%). On that table you'll also see what has been cleared by the client and what is still pending. Hope that helps!

« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2019, 11:41 »
0
Very nice report!  ;D And a stupid question... can you sell prints of editorial images on FAA? Or do you just upload commercial stuff in there?

ShadySue

« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2019, 12:08 »
+1
Very nice report!  ;D And a stupid question... can you sell prints of editorial images on FAA? Or do you just upload commercial stuff in there?
There is no inspection there, so it's 100% up to you to keep on the right side of the Law in your country, or wherever you took the pics.

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2019, 12:16 »
0
My understanding from reading the photographers guide to copyright is that selling a print of your own work is not considered to be "publishing" and so you can sell prints (at least in the USA) of anything you have taken. It is the act of "publishing" that bring the potential risks of infringing on trademarks or needing releases etc.

By the way, I've just published my own monthly report on video sales today. I always wait until the month finally ends to do my main report. The video one is here:

https://www.backyardsilver.com/2019/11/video-stock-sales-in-november-2019/

Steve

« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2019, 12:52 »
0
My understanding from reading the photographers guide to copyright is that selling a print of your own work is not considered to be "publishing" and so you can sell prints (at least in the USA) of anything you have taken. It is the act of "publishing" that bring the potential risks of infringing on trademarks or needing releases etc.

By the way, I've just published my own monthly report on video sales today. I always wait until the month finally ends to do my main report. The video one is here:

https://www.backyardsilver.com/2019/11/video-stock-sales-in-november-2019/

Steve

FAA also sells mugs, hats, shirts, shower curtains, bags.. etc.,.  It's not just art prints.  I think merchandise and one off art prints have different risk factors when it comes to editorial.  You can turn the products auto function off..  but generally I don't post editorial content there. 

« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2019, 14:50 »
0
Great info, as always.Do you, by any chance, know what we actually earn at Alamy. When I go to Sales history the Amount is actually the price the picture is sold for? And then there is 40% for Alamy and additional 30% if it is a partner sale, which usually is?

Thanks!

What shows up on your dashboard is the gross sale price. To get more details you actually have to go into 1. My Alamy tab 2. Account balance. There you'll be able to see how much each has earned, both as gross and then net...commissions at Alamy are on three different tiers: exclusive sale (50%), or non-exclusive sale (40%) or distribution sale (30%). On that table you'll also see what has been cleared by the client and what is still pending. Hope that helps!
Thank you, it helps a lot. It shows how dishonest Alamy is by hiding the most important information (the amount I earn from a sale) under several clicks and weird and complicated information table. On the front page you are just prompted with gross sale that makes you think that you made a huge sale, since thats what we are used to see on other agencies - the amount we earn.

« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2019, 15:40 »
0
Great info, as always.Do you, by any chance, know what we actually earn at Alamy. When I go to Sales history the Amount is actually the price the picture is sold for? And then there is 40% for Alamy and additional 30% if it is a partner sale, which usually is?

Thanks!

What shows up on your dashboard is the gross sale price. To get more details you actually have to go into 1. My Alamy tab 2. Account balance. There you'll be able to see how much each has earned, both as gross and then net...commissions at Alamy are on three different tiers: exclusive sale (50%), or non-exclusive sale (40%) or distribution sale (30%). On that table you'll also see what has been cleared by the client and what is still pending. Hope that helps!
Thank you, it helps a lot. It shows how dishonest Alamy is by hiding the most important information (the amount I earn from a sale) under several clicks and weird and complicated information table. On the front page you are just prompted with gross sale that makes you think that you made a huge sale, since thats what we are used to see on other agencies - the amount we earn.

I don't think I would call that dishonest myself, but I will say that when I worked for the NHS information for patients had to be written so that a ten year old could read it, maybe they could follow that example.

ShadySue

« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2019, 15:51 »
+1
Thank you, it helps a lot. It shows how dishonest Alamy is by hiding the most important information (the amount I earn from a sale) under several clicks and weird and complicated information table. On the front page you are just prompted with gross sale that makes you think that you made a huge sale, since thats what we are used to see on other agencies - the amount we earn.
To be fair, Alamy started out with more macro-like earnings, and it was traditional for macro agencies to quote files sales gross.

Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2019, 03:06 »
0
Great info, as always.Do you, by any chance, know what we actually earn at Alamy. When I go to Sales history the Amount is actually the price the picture is sold for? And then there is 40% for Alamy and additional 30% if it is a partner sale, which usually is?

Thanks!

What shows up on your dashboard is the gross sale price. To get more details you actually have to go into 1. My Alamy tab 2. Account balance. There you'll be able to see how much each has earned, both as gross and then net...commissions at Alamy are on three different tiers: exclusive sale (50%), or non-exclusive sale (40%) or distribution sale (30%). On that table you'll also see what has been cleared by the client and what is still pending. Hope that helps!
Thank you, it helps a lot. It shows how dishonest Alamy is by hiding the most important information (the amount I earn from a sale) under several clicks and weird and complicated information table. On the front page you are just prompted with gross sale that makes you think that you made a huge sale, since thats what we are used to see on other agencies - the amount we earn.

I wouldn't call it dishonest but at worst, it's misleading. Remember, that gross amount doesn't mean anything until it has been cleared. Clients can and on rare occasions will cancel sales.


« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2019, 03:17 »
+3
If I ever thought agencies were somehow "honest" I would be more concerned about not knowing the gross  made on each of my images on nearly every other site ;-).

« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2019, 05:21 »
+2
Just to correct myself, since a lot of you replied, I used the word dishonest because of my bad English. I was looking for the right word for like 10 minutes, but just couldn't find it. But, you know what I meant. We can agree that the info is hidden and like obljow (or in whatever order you put letters for that word :) ) said - a ten year old should be able to read it. So, my mistake for incorrect wording, I admit.

« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2019, 06:26 »
0
Very nice report!  ;D And a stupid question... can you sell prints of editorial images on FAA? Or do you just upload commercial stuff in there?
There is no inspection there, so it's 100% up to you to keep on the right side of the Law in your country, or wherever you took the pics.

Thanks Sue & Steve & Trek, I have come across editorial photos on print, so I thought maybe I'm missing something or the rules are different than micro.

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #14 on: December 01, 2019, 11:49 »
+1
Here is the rest of the story on earnings from me. Very good month with a total of $3418. Not my best ever month, but getting there.



Full details as always on my blog: https://www.backyardsilver.com/2019/12/making-money-as-a-stock-photographer-nov-2019/

Steve

ShadySue

« Reply #15 on: December 01, 2019, 12:13 »
0
[... I would call that dishonest myself, but I will say that when I worked for the NHS information for patients had to be written so that a ten year old could read it, maybe they could follow that example.
That has changed.
For example my sister was recently told she had 'deterioration of the foot' (sounds like 'footrot'!) which I Googled and found it means osteo-arthritis.
Another friend was told she had three different conditions after a brain scan - again Googling and adding them together it seemed she has Vascular Dementia, and indeed she has; but she isnt fully accepting it, because that "isn't what my scan showed".

« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2019, 14:10 »
0
[... I would call that dishonest myself, but I will say that when I worked for the NHS information for patients had to be written so that a ten year old could read it, maybe they could follow that example.
That has changed.
For example my sister was recently told she had 'deterioration of the foot' (sounds like 'footrot'!) 

....personally, if it were me, I'd prefer deterioration of the foot. I hope she's able to recover.

Not a bad month but that had everything to do with one particular SS sale that netted me $125.00. Better than last November and better than November, 2017....by $0.24. ::) HD sales are dwindling.


steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #17 on: December 02, 2019, 11:09 »
0
I forgot to talk about which agencies did well for me in November in my previous blog post so I rectified that this morning. No surprises - Shutterstock was my best agency!

https://www.backyardsilver.com/2019/12/review-of-stock-agency-sales-in-november-2019/

Steve

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #18 on: December 02, 2019, 14:37 »
+2

Thank you, it helps a lot. It shows how dishonest Alamy is by hiding the most important information (the amount I earn from a sale) under several clicks and weird and complicated information table. On the front page you are just prompted with gross sale that makes you think that you made a huge sale, since thats what we are used to see on other agencies - the amount we earn.

Bookmark this page:  https://www.alamy.com/alamycontributorreports/Reports.aspx?Rep=1

There, isn't that easy?  ;)

The table might look strange because they are totally open about how much the image sold for, percentages, how much was taken out and what you get. Also what has cleared and what has not. In other words, more useful and truthful information than the rest.

« Reply #19 on: December 03, 2019, 21:46 »
0

Thank you, it helps a lot. It shows how dishonest Alamy is by hiding the most important information (the amount I earn from a sale) under several clicks and weird and complicated information table. On the front page you are just prompted with gross sale that makes you think that you made a huge sale, since thats what we are used to see on other agencies - the amount we earn.

Bookmark this page:  https://www.alamy.com/alamycontributorreports/Reports.aspx?Rep=1

There, isn't that easy?  ;)

The table might look strange because they are totally open about how much the image sold for, percentages, how much was taken out and what you get. Also what has cleared and what has not. In other words, more useful and truthful information than the rest.
This is really helpful


 

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